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Thread: A few questions

  1. #1
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    Default A few questions

    Just a few questions from a newbie on salmon fishing.
    1.There are still a lot of makers who give their rods a double # rating,so,would a newcomer be better to choose a shorter head size in the higher # rating or a longer head size in the lower # rating?
    2.Is the new Lureflash Highland Spirit 13'#9/10 suitable for a beginner(if one believes the hype)?
    3.Would a floating line with several polyleaders be the way to go to cover some of the methods,or would it be better to buy lines to fish at the designated depths?(I'm a skinflint).I've also experienced the hinging effect of these while trout fishing.
    4.What would be your standard set up(given optimum fishing conditions)?.I realise this is quite a subjective question,but it would be interesting for myself to find out what the dyed in the wool salmon fishers like to fish with.I might also see if there is any common denominator in your choice of tackle.
    Thanks in advance Andy.

  2. #2
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    The double # rating used to correspond to double-taper/forward-taper but now I suspect it is pure marketing and often miss-information. I have seen some rods labelled #9/10/11. Now what does that mean? - a rod that works well with a wide range of lines? It might work - but what is best? Hmmph.

    Rant over.

    For spey casting, I would always recommend you start learning with a heavy, short-ish head (less than 55ft). Actually, come to think of it I can’t remember the last time I used anything longer. Baffles me why 65ft heads are the best sellers? Still everyone develops their own style, but I can tell you that most of the people I see struggling with spey casting are either handicapped by their non-matching rod/line or they are working with far too big a loop which they can’t control properly and dump in the water or the bushes (too much line out).

    Both are related of course, if you use too light a line for the rod then you need more line out to load it – ouch! So this brings me back to the setup. Heavy line #11 on #10 rod and short head. Otherwise be prepared for misery! Not that all #10s are the same – which brings us on to the real culprit in all of this, which is the pathetically inadequate AFTM system. More modern thinking manufacturers talk about gram weight of head required to load the rod. Much better. The range of head weights (in grams) for the same AFTM is almost unbelievable!

    I'm ranting again.

    Floating line with poly leaders is the standard choice these days. But when you do improve I do suggest you use short-head (45-55ft) sinking lines when you need to get down. I find fishing a sinking line (short head) with a light fly is much nicer than fishing a floating line with a heavy fly.

    Anyway, MHO for what its worth!

    Good luck.

    Colin.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Much appreciated CB.

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up Good answer above Colin.

    I've 'taught' a lot of folks how to use/cast 2-hander rods and the typical mistake (at purchase) is a line with a very long head. Most folks just can't handle that much line out the tip-top. In most 'real life' fishing conditions a head/leader as short as 35 to 55 feet is more than adequate.

    Hence the popularity of Skagit and Scandi head lines. There are a few exceptions (Carron spey lines come to mind), but these best used for/in "competition casting" or skater dry flies cast 'fine and far off.'

    fae

  5. #5
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    If you have a long head or DT line you have the ability to control the fly, you can't do that with yards of running line between the rod and "head".

    If there was one thing I could imprint on the brain of every fly fisher it would be "control the fly". You can't always have total control of the fly, or necessarily want total control all the time, but controlling the fly has to be the epitome of fly fishing skill.

    Where is the fun in fly fishing without control? Is it the crazy idea of salmon fly fishing being down to complete chance and not requiring skill that attracts so many to salmon fishing?
    Avoid any spey casting instructor who can't spey cast 35 yards of sinking fly line with a 15ft rod.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cb View Post
    For spey casting, I would always recommend you start learning with a heavy, short-ish head (less than 55ft). Actually, come to think of it I can’t remember the last time I used anything longer. Baffles me why 65ft heads are the best sellers? Still everyone develops their own style, but I can tell you that most of the people I see struggling with spey casting are either handicapped by their non-matching rod/line or they are working with far too big a loop which they can’t control properly and dump in the water or the bushes (too much line out).

    Both are related of course, if you use too light a line for the rod then you need more line out to load it – ouch! So this brings me back to the setup. Heavy line #11 on #10 rod and short head. Otherwise be prepared for misery! Not that all #10s are the same – which brings us on to the real culprit in all of this, which is the pathetically inadequate AFTM system. More modern thinking manufacturers talk about gram weight of head required to load the rod. Much better. The range of head weights (in grams) for the same AFTM is almost unbelievable!

    I'm ranting again.

    Floating line with poly leaders is the standard choice these days. But when you do improve I do suggest you use short-head (45-55ft) sinking lines when you need to get down. I find fishing a sinking line (short head) with a light fly is much nicer than fishing a floating line with a heavy fly.

    Anyway, MHO for what its worth!

    Good luck.

    Colin.
    Colin are you qualified to give advice?

    Best go to a qualified Spey Casting instructor who should teach you line control, start with a line that matches your rod, starting with a short heavy line is a bit like learning to drive with an automatic.

    Learn the basics right then decide where you want to go.
    Malcolm
    <')\\\\\<<
    Quot homines tot sententiae

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