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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Stow on the Wold
    Posts
    2,174

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    Interesting post this. I love a day out trotting on my own. No great shakes on methods, learnt a lot from the chaps above. I personally don't get very serious about tactics. If I can get the float moving and steer it where I want it within reason, I'm happy.

    Enjoy your trotting-bigger fish will come and well done so far.

    Chris.
    The charm of fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope. John Buchan 1st Baron Tweedsmuir.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,872

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    EC it would be good to get together sometime, where are you located, if I'm across your way I'd happily have a day out trout or coarse.

    From some posts and not from you in particular, I do get the impression that many people misunderstand what match fishing is and what is involved. Most seen to think it is a bunch of anglers employing light line tactics to catch as many small fish as possible but nothing could be further from the truth. It is simply a competition where like minded anglers fish in a row to win the competition. Within match fishing you have certain groups of anglers.

    On the rivers when I was young, people would point out anglers in the draw queue and tell me you need to watch him on the stick, he's the best stick float angler on the river. Next somebody else would be pointed out, he's brilliant on the waggler, but see him over there? He's a brilliant chub angler. And on it went, lead anglers, feeder anglers, lob worm anglers, maggot anglers, bread anglers and hemp and caster anglers.

    My aim at 15 was to be as good as all the specialists and be a complete angler, competent at every method, knowing all the ins and outs of each method, regardless of whether it was fishing for minnows or specimen sized barbel and carp, (pre commercial fisheries when river matches were 80 -200 pegs). Whether it was fishing the stick, waggler, pole, or feeder, fishing for carp, roach dace, bream or big barbel I wanted to be good at all of it.

    When I speak with other top level anglers they were all the same and the one thing I've found fishing all over the country, is that all of the top flight match anglers and I'm probably talking about the top 5% in the UK are complete all round anglers who are just as happy sitting it out with 10-12lb line and a big bait waiting for 1/2 dozen bites from specimen fish to win a match as they are fishing for 10-20lbs of roach or 100 - 200lbs of carp.

    I know how effective bread can be and how instant it can be. If I was searching for chub holding areas in winter it would be the first bait out of my bag. I grew up fishing bread for roach however in those days a 1lb roach in the north east was a specimen as was a 3lb tench. Today neither would get a second glance, particularly in the south where the quality of coarse fishing has always been better than the north.

    I haven't coarse fished for over two years but I'd happily dust my gear off to fish a venue I haven't fished before.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Staffs
    Posts
    9,674

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    Quote Originally Posted by empty creel View Post
    Interestingly Mark graduated to specialist angling from match fishing
    A bit like that other master river match angler, the "man in red" Jan Porter, who then became the man in camo in the specialist world. Sadly no longer with us

    Dave, waggler - indeed - aside from when I lived in Nottingham and fished the Trent every week (and that was either stick float on inside line or feeder down middle or far bank, ie rarely waggler), most other rivers I've fished through my life have been small to medium rivers with a decent pace, so I've never really had the need to float fish at range with a waggler. I did a couple of times in club matches on Warks Avon (Evesham), not very successfully, and once I think on the Welland for a good bag of roach on hemp and caster for a section win, but thats probably about the sum of my river waggler fishing! These days pleasure fishing I like roving anyway so travel light and either just take a stick float/'pin set up rod or that plus a leger rod, so again the waggler doesn't tend to get a look in.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    Tares may be worth a try.

  5. #25

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    I was out again on Saturday. I've had a couple of sessions since I last posted but struggled to get anything substantial but then on Saturday I had a bit of a red letter session. Rather than roving through the 6 spots where a half decent trot is possible, I decided to concentrate on one glide that has been productive for flyfishing in the summer. I only had about an hour and a half before it got too dark so I thought I should put all my eggs in one basket, do some heavy feeding with bread mash and maggots and try to get some interest.

    For once I didn't get a single fingerling fish but in the 90 minutes I managed 7-8 chub all of proper "rod-bending" size, that more than 2lb in my book.

    I wish I had been able to start earlier in the day as it didn't feel like the bites were slowing down and unfortunately that's probably all I'll manage for a good few weeks.

    If I can manage, the next time I'll be out is in the cold crisp spring if the river isn't blown out. should i need to change tactics much? Less feeding maybe?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Staffs
    Posts
    9,674

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    Quote Originally Posted by tobesfish View Post
    I was out again on Saturday. I've had a couple of sessions since I last posted but struggled to get anything substantial but then on Saturday I had a bit of a red letter session. Rather than roving through the 6 spots where a half decent trot is possible, I decided to concentrate on one glide that has been productive for flyfishing in the summer. I only had about an hour and a half before it got too dark so I thought I should put all my eggs in one basket, do some heavy feeding with bread mash and maggots and try to get some interest.

    For once I didn't get a single fingerling fish but in the 90 minutes I managed 7-8 chub all of proper "rod-bending" size, that more than 2lb in my book.

    I wish I had been able to start earlier in the day as it didn't feel like the bites were slowing down and unfortunately that's probably all I'll manage for a good few weeks.

    If I can manage, the next time I'll be out is in the cold crisp spring if the river isn't blown out. should i need to change tactics much? Less feeding maybe?
    Hi, if you're after chub, hoof the bait in as you've discovered! Greedy bu&&ers and sizeable fish. Sounds like a fantastic short session to me Overfeeding is more a risk with grayling and smaller silver fish, so like most things, its just a case of tailoring your approach to what you're after. Saying that, I was trotting on the Taff near Cardiff a month ago, never fished it before, but the grayling there were numerous and greedy, plus its quite a big river, and I needed a lot more feeding to get them going properly than the fish on my usual rivers (Dove and Churnet), so different rivers also require a bit of different thinking sometimes.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Wessex
    Posts
    966

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    Well done tobesfish.
    By accident you have stumbled upon the old (pre-paste) bread and mash method of chub catching.

    The way you do it is start the day before with 2-4 loaves of stale bread, doesnt matter if its a little mouldy, break it up into a bucket and fill with water keep topping up the water as the bread soaks it all in, leave it overnight then get a stick or potato masher and pulp it all up and lay the bucket over and drain off all the excess water.
    Half a loaf of fresh bread as hookbait, rod, net and your mash and off you go.

    If you can always walk upstream, a handful of mash goes into each swim and you fish it 20mins later putting in a golfball size lump before your first trot.
    Results will be instant so be preparred and ready.
    Big 1" sized lump of flake just above size10 hook just squeezed on lightly, if no bite strike the flake off at the end of the trot, if it doesn't come off you've squeezed it on to tight!
    Expect anything from 3-5 fish per swim but as soon as the bites stop move to the next swim, dont hang about waiting, just leave it and move on.
    Release all your fish 20m+ upsteam of the swim or they will spook the others and kill the swim.

    You can feed chub out of a snag either by baiting them upstream, feed small and lead them away from it or downsteam by feeding directly into the snag and just behind.

    Fish heavy, 4-5lb hook lengths min. because a big chub can really pull.
    If a big fish is hooked dont try and bully it upstream, go down and get it!!
    Thus you you should always lay your net below you with the frame downstream - its easier to pull a net by the frame than struggle to keep it airborn away from the ground snags in front.

    Using the above you should get 5-8 decent fish from most waters.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Carnforth
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    HI,
    I had hours of enjoyment on the river Brue in Somerset, at Lydford.
    I despise fixed spool reels and would not give you twopence for one to use trotting.
    I use a Ron Thompson combo rod, a Bakelite center pin, 4 lb line and a short hook trace with number twelve spade end hooks.
    I buy the freshest pan loaf for the hook and use a combination of stale bread and stewed hemp as feeder.
    I wade so I am mid stream and can see both banks.
    I usually look for a shallow run into a deeper glide where bigger fish shoal up.
    The best times are on a falling spate with a bit of colour.
    I make my own floats from Swan quills with a no nonsense paper clip eye, taped around with sparks tape and the tip dipped in red Dayglow.
    Chub are a lovely fish with beautiful golden iridiscence and in good condition will give you as good a pull as a trout of similar size.
    If bread fails (and that is rare), then try a Black berry or a slug, though I find that you'll only get one after which the rest seemed spooked!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North East Wales
    Posts
    11,363
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: First go at trotting

    Quote Originally Posted by bumble54 View Post
    I can only give you an instance of something that happened to me many years ago. I fished a particular canal on a regular basis and most of the roach were in the 2-6oz range, then one winter, after talking to the lock keeper, I started fishing a unpromising looking stretch, casters for bait, the roach averaged about a pound with the biggest at a pound and a half. It seemed that the bigger fish had a liking for that area and were unlikely to be caught elsewhere. Its something I've noticed many times at different venues, so, as suggested, try somewhere different, it need not be very far.
    I had a similar experience on the Monnow many years ago. I used to fish a stretch in Monmouth almost every day and knew it pretty well, usually targetting chub and trout with a leger or freeline, and now and again got the odd big roach. One winter he club secretary taught me how to trot for dace and it got me interested in trotting for other species including roach.

    Over time I located a few places where roach shoaled and had a few decent catches of 4oz to 12oz fish but nothing bigger. One day I let a trot go 30 yards downstream to an area that had no apparent features and I had not really fished before. I got a bite that turned out to be a cracking roach of about 1lb 8oz. I moved down and soon had about a dozen of similar size. To cut a long story short over several seasons this shoal could often be found there but could only be caught trotting one fairly narrow line about 10 yards long, a foot or so off line and no bites. The smallest fish I caught there was just over 1lb and the largest was 1lb 15oz. In about 4 miles of our club water there were only three or four swims where catching roach was a decent possibility and all of them were apparently featureless.
    Last edited by sewinbasher; 01-05-2019 at 08:34 AM.
    “There is no more lovely country than Monmouthshire in early spring. Nowhere do the larks sing quite so passionately, as if somehow inspired by the Welsh themselves. There is a blackbird on every thorn and a cock chaffinch, a twink as they call him there, on every bush...... It moved me profoundly. I had been spared to see another spring, and I thank God for it.”

    Oliver Kite
    “A Spring Day on the Usk”
    A Fisherman’s Diary

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