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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Not So Greater Manchester.
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    Default Re: What was entomology?

    Looking at boisker's last post, you can see how removing trees and hedgerows leads to soil erosion due to rain runoff. Okay, the silt may be good habitat for certain insects but not when laced with insecticides.
    I have a wife and daughter. I'm always wrong and outnumbered. Hidden Content

    A Lancsy Lad. Hidden Content

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
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    Thick end of the stick.
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    Default Re: What was entomology?

    Quote Originally Posted by wobbly face View Post
    Okay, the silt may be good habitat for certain insects but not when laced with insecticides.
    No silt isn't good habitat for inverts or at least not the inverts we should have in many rivers. It is really only any use for mayfly (the true mayfly, the big one) and if it has enough decaying vegetable matter in it (most of it is just clean soil off nearly bare fields) chironomids or buzzers which aren't really suited to fast flowing rivers.
    No silt just smothers gravels clogging up all the gaps where inverts should live as well as bu99ering fish spawning. It brings nothing to the party when it comes in at the rate of thousands of tons/spate.

    It isn't a new porblem, it was identified decades ago and still farmers chuck their soil (THE building block of their business) away without a care. Every few years another attempt is made to educate the shortsighted halfwits but nothing changes.
    Maxima (or Drennan Sub Surface Green) forever

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Yorkshire
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: What was entomology?

    I cant be on my own noticing that going back a few years in Summer the front of your car was covered in splattered insects after a drive in the country... These days there is very little , I am sure that most of us have noticed the difference . Its a massive change.

    O M W

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    7,027

    Default Re: What was entomology?

    In 1996 I went to a seminar in Denmark on river restoration. They were years ahead of us in tackling the problems associated with field run-off among other things. As was explained to us, much of Denmark has very sandy soil which runs off easily, so they introduced a measure whereby every stream, river, and even tiny brooks had to have a 2m wide buffer strip along each bank. This effectively trapped the sediment and prevented it getting into their watercourses.

    They were also years ahead of us in building bypass channels around impassable structures to open up spawning grounds higher up.

    Farmers get grants from Defra, aka the Government, to care for the countryside for the benefit of wildlife. I think we need to call the whole industry to account and demand to know what they are spending taxpayers - our - money on, because it sure isn't care for the countryside for the benefit of wildlife.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    1,925

    Default Re: What was entomology?

    The biggest failing in the agri schemes is the inability of DEFRA to successfully check that landowners successfully meet the requirements.
    The basic payment scheme (which is paid per hectare)- which although as it’s name suggests is ‘quite basic’... it’s overall requirements could deliver fantastic benefits.
    It is supposed to set minimum standards to deliver good agricultural and environmental benefits and if adhered to would massively reduce many of the problems (not all, but the difference would be significant).... but DEFRA doesn’t have anywhere near the required number of staff to inspect land holdings and check that they are meeting the schemes minimum requirements.
    All the routine things that repeatedly cause issues- no margins, no cultivating to river edge, no ploughing on steep slopes and always ploughing with contours, application of manure etc etc are all repeatedly broken by some farmers / landowners.
    We need a regulatory body that actually fines people for non-compliance and takes people to court for serious pollution incidents.
    By pollution of water ways I don’t just mean pesticide / slurry tanks, I would class serious erosion and large volumes of sediment entering a river as pollution.

  6. #16

    Default Re: What was entomology?

    We need regulations which address the farming issues and an inspectorate which polices them until current practices change.

    Even less likely is a complete review of permitted pesticides, neonicotinoids and synthetic pyrethroids are used throughout agriculture in vast quantities and have been proven to kill insects far beyond their targeted area. There are very well heeled lobbies from landowners and the agri-chemical industries, there's very little hope for change without a groundswell of public concern about the state of nature.

    The problem of chemicals isn't confined to farming though, in many cases domestic pesticides - weed killers and pet flea treatments for example - have been shown to have an equally profound impact on invertebrates.

    Check this out, from the Buglife news page, a clear indicator that some of this stuff is too dangerous to be used either in farming or in the wider community. To expect pet owners to keep their animals out of water is about as unlikely as as asking a farmer keeping their sheep out of watercourses after a cypermethrin treatment. That use was eventually stopped but the problem of unregulated domestic applications remain along with wider issues of permitted agricultural chemicals. Apols for length of article but it's worth a read -

    Tunbridge Wells insecticide pollution traced to sewage plant

    Insecticide pollution in a Tunbridge Wells waterway has been traced to a sewage treatment works following an investigation by Tonbridge and Malling Friends of the Earth.



    The local Friends of the Earth group decided to carry out tests after a report by Buglife, published in December 2017, identified Somerhill stream in Tunbridge Wells as one of a number of waterways polluted with high levels of neonicotinoid pesticides.



    Imidacloprid, the chemical found in Somerhill stream, was restricted for most agricultural uses in 2013, and was banned from use in all agricultural fields in 2018 but is still allowed as a pet flea treatment.



    Although the source of neonicotinoid pollution in some British rivers has been linked to previous use of these chemicals on farms the most likely source of pollution in the Somerhill Stream is flea pet treatments. The waste water is from a predominantly urban area and washing of pets and their bedding is likely to result in the chemicals appearing in the waste water.



    Concerned by the harm caused to their local environment, Nathalie Baron and Anthony Bales from Tonbridge and Malling Friends of the Earth undertook their own investigation over several months, conducting extensive research and field work that culminated in collecting samples from strategic points in November 2018 and sending them to a laboratory for analysis.



    The results revealed that the stream continues to be polluted at chronically harmful levels with Imidacloprid (0.192g/l). More significantly the levels recorded in the outfall from the Tunbridge Wells North Waste Water Treatment Works in Dowding Way were even higher (0.233g/l) and concentrations were so high that scientific evidence shows they could harm aquatic life over a short time of exposure.



    Nathalie Baron of Tonbridge and Malling Friends of the Earth said: "We are extremely concerned by our findings: Imidacloprid pollution poses a significant threat to our local aquatic life. Research in other countries has demonstrated that Waste Water Treatment Plants are releasing dangerous levels of Imidacloprid into waterways. We appreciate that Water Treatment Plants such as Southern Water’s Tunbridge Wells North Waste Water Treatment Works are not currently required by the regulations to test for Imidacloprid contamination. We are therefore calling on the government to take the necessary steps to ensure that Imidacloprid levels are monitored at the water treatment stage and that urgent action is taken to eliminate it from our streams and rivers."



    Matt Shardlow CEO of Buglife, and author of the pivotal report on neonicotinoid pollution in freshwater said: “Hats off to Nathalie and Anthony from Tonbridge and Malling Friends of the Earth for revealing the source of this pollution and helping to confirm that pet flea treatments are harming our rivers.



    “It is distressing that nothing concrete has been done by the authorities in the 12 months since we published our report and recommended that Imidacloprid flea treatments should be suspended and their pollution of the environment reviewed. Our mayflies, beetles and dragonflies continue to suffer from high levels of insecticides; we hope that Defra will ensure that action is taken soon.”



    Until Defra and the Veterinary Medicines Directorate take action the public are being advised by Buglife to:

    1. Only use pet flea treatments when necessary.

    2. To avoid persistent insecticides such as Imidacloprid and Fipronil.

    3. Not to allow pets that have been treated in the previous 3 months to enter water.

    4. To destroy bedding used by treated pets, rather than washing it.

    5. To wash treated pets in the garden, not the bathroom, and to dispose of any washing water by pouring it onto a low wildlife value lawn.
    Musha rig um du rum da

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
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    Default Re: What was entomology?

    Quote Originally Posted by boisker View Post
    The biggest failing in the agri schemes is the inability of DEFRA to successfully check that landowners successfully meet the requirements.
    I think the question in relation to soil erosion is why do we need anyone to check? Why are farmers so happy to let thousands of tons of soil wash away every year? Why can't they see it is in their own interest to hold onto the soil? They have been told about it for all of my lifetime (fifty years) and I'm sure thinking people were talking about it before that. Are they just stupid, shortsighted, not interested, historically given too many badly directed handouts?

    Buffer strips are a nice idea but a 2m one is no use in many areas, the silt laden runoff will just go straight over that. 20m would be needed to slow and catch the sediment runoff I've seen from maize fields in Devon.
    Maxima (or Drennan Sub Surface Green) forever

  8. #18

    Default Re: What was entomology?

    Here's a field just upstream from me at Cenarth where the landowner took on all of the latest advice and left a 2 mm buffer strip -

    Musha rig um du rum da

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    1,925

    Default Re: What was entomology?

    I don’t reckon much to his measuring skills

    To be honest the exact measurements are irrelevant, it needs to legislated for buffer zones that are suitable for the location, if most of the field slopes away from the river 2m is fine, if the whole field slopes down to the river it needs to be more like 10m!
    But none of it works with poorly timed operations, the move away from spring cereals was a killer...

    Perhaps they should move the penalties away from financial....
    along the lines of..... ‘anyone found polluting the stream, river, ditch through poorly chosen (steep slopes) or timed (winter wheat) and avoidable operations will have their balls smashed between two bricks’....
    I reckon that would focus their minds and give some motivation to get it right

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    113
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Re: What was entomology?

    Control of pesticides, modification of land use are all possible, but it's all tied up with economics, lack of cooperation between countries, worsening all the time. As for world population, the solution there is reduced 3rd-world poverty and education of women. Since that means the West giving up some of its wealth, and patriarchal societies changing, I find it hard to see how these things will happen. Even climate change is looking almost impossible to do anything about.

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