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  1. #1
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    Default Treat with caution...

    Chaps I've promoted the Davy Knot and it all went pear-shaped. I've struggled with the co-polymers that present a dry so delicately yet seem to fail in a random way at the fly (rarely at a tippet ring) l can't find the post at the end of last season but I came home despondent after so many breafoffs that just didn't make sense. For some reason I tied up a Tenkara 'one knot' I had been looking at and headed off to my local. They were on the chew and I worked through quite a few fish with not a break.

    It's possibly also called the Scaffold Knot. It's tied differently but does look to be the same knot. Give it a go. One plus is it doesn't have any friction until the knot is bedded down in it final form. Anyone who tries a half-blood with these modern lines will appreciate that I'm sure... I've used this through the winter on cabin-fever coarse fish. It been close to perfect but, a bit like the Davy, don't get cocky about it. Worth a go?

    I might even dig out that Stroft 1kg that cost six quid and broke at the drop of a hat....
    Last edited by beryl; 22-03-2017 at 08:24 PM.
    Growing old disgracefully!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    I used Stroft for most of last season because I found the knots consistent and reliable. It's not the knot, it's how you tie them. Half blood for me, 50 years, no problems.
    https://leconfieldflyfishingclub.com/

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    Has Stroft been around for fifty years?
    Growing old disgracefully!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    Quote Originally Posted by sofasurfer View Post
    I used Stroft for most of last season because I found the knots consistent and reliable. It's not the knot, it's how you tie them. Half blood for me, 50 years, no problems.
    The half blood has to be carefully tied. As soon as you start to tighten there is fiction. Wet and careful with a nylon like Maxima is no problem, but you have to be super careful with co-polymers not to get a trace of pigtail. I use nothing above 3lb breaking strain. Maybe the larger diameters don't suffer as much?

    I've still plenty of 2lb Maxima around for early nymphing but once a dry is the fly of choice the presentation of the co-polymers is too seductive to ignore. So far so good, no inexplicable breakoffs.
    Last edited by beryl; 24-03-2017 at 08:12 PM.
    Growing old disgracefully!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    For fly to tippet I have always used the 5-turn tucked half-blood (or improved clinch) but I may try the 4-turn Grinner knot & see how I go this season.
    Barley heard a bad word said about the Grinner or Uni knot.
    Smallest wild brown:
    2oz 14dr 734gr (approx)

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    Quote Originally Posted by steve collyer View Post
    For fly to tippet I have always used the 5-turn tucked half-blood (or improved clinch) but I may try the 4-turn Grinner knot & see how I go this season.
    Barley heard a bad word said about the Grinner or Uni knot.
    I used a half blood and lost a much sort after carp when using braid. It's slips unless you tuck the tag through the loop you created when putting the tag through the loop next to the hook. Nylon, it woundnt have been a problem, I just didn't know my onions as they say. Mortified at the time of course.
    Growing old disgracefully!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    I would only suggest the knot if you are having problems. It takes much more tippet than the Davy or a half-blood if you need to change a fly.
    Growing old disgracefully!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    Quote Originally Posted by beryl View Post
    I would only suggest the knot if you are having problems. It takes much more tippet than the Davy or a half-blood if you need to change a fly.
    Yeah I noticed whilst practicing that the grinner (Uni) uses far more tippet as you need a longer tag end to create the knot with ease. As the knot forms the tag end isn't really taken up much, either.
    I generally only lose about an inch of tippet per tucked half blood knot, in comparison with a good 3 inches with the grinner.
    Smallest wild brown:
    2oz 14dr 734gr (approx)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    I've been tying fishing knots for 50 years and have never had a problem with the blood knot. Which I always 'wet' with saliva.

    But if I'm feeling less lazy than usual I sometimes use the grinner, particularly during mayfly time when you can get bigger fish than usual, and which can take with a hell of a thump. But as posted above I also use more line with a grinner.

    Leader/tippet material. I always use 'regular' nylon.

    I used to use Orvis Superstrong 'copolymer' but it often broke at the knot so I quickly stopped using it. They have now 'improved' it to Superstrong 2 which to me is an admission that the original was ****. So what they said was 'better' wasn't, so I see no reason to believe they are not still telling lies now, so won't buy it. Anyway, the Drennan I usually use is fine so why change?

    Flourocarbon.
    I tried it out of curiosity. But it is heavier then regular nylon so it sunk too far for me. As I mostly fish the dry fly it caused the fly to be dragged under on the lift off and I kept having to dry it. So I gave up on it after a very short time.

    Anyway, I'm not one of these mugs that rushes to buy every new gimmick. The manufacturers exist to make money, what they make and sell is merely a necessary process to do that.
    But they aren't having mine when what I use now is perfectly adequate and I still have plenty of it lying around. I doubt trout have 'evolved' a whole lot in 50 years either. Judging by my catches over those years, if anything they have done the opposite.
    Last edited by john young; 25-03-2017 at 07:05 AM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Treat with caution...

    Quote Originally Posted by john young View Post
    I've been tying fishing knots for 50 years and have never had a problem with the blood knot. Which I always 'wet' with saliva.

    But if I'm feeling less lazy than usual I sometimes use the grinner, particularly during mayfly time when you can get bigger fish than usual, and which can take with a hell of a thump. But as posted above I also use more line with a grinner.

    Leader/tippet material. I always use 'regular' nylon.

    I used to use Orvis Superstrong 'copolymer' but it often broke at the knot so I quickly stopped using it. They have now 'improved' it to Superstrong 2 which to me is an admission that the original was ****. So what they said was 'better' wasn't, so I see no reason to believe they are not still telling lies now, so won't buy it. Anyway, the Drennan I usually use is fine so why change?

    Flourocarbon.
    I tried it out of curiosity. But it is heavier then regular nylon so it sunk too far for me. As I mostly fish the dry fly it caused the fly to be dragged under on the lift off and I kept having to dry it. So I gave up on it after a very short time.

    Anyway, I'm not one of these mugs that rushes to buy every new gimmick. The manufacturers exist to make money, what they make and sell is merely a necessary process to do that.
    But they aren't having mine when what I use now is perfectly adequate and I still have plenty of it lying around. I doubt trout have 'evolved' a whole lot in 50 years either. Judging by my catches over those years, if anything they have done the opposite.
    Although my fishing experience is less than yours - around 42 years - I have to say I do similar... except I sometimes find that the bigger fish often show at other times of the season to May, so when I spot a big fish rising I quickly slip off the blood knot tied fly and tie it back on with a grinner. Of course you've then got to deal with the whole reverse process when the next trout you spot rising is a smaller fish that doesn't require the grinner's extra strength. Tricky business trout fishing...
    "I would love to live like a river flows, carried by the surprise of its own unfolding" John O'Donohue

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