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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Market Harborough
    Posts
    527

    Default

    Hans,
    One more quick question.
    As I have experienced this is a very effective fly.
    You mentioned that it can be fished dry, damp or wet.

    Dry-I put some floatant on the deer hair only.
    Damp-Leave as is, and it should sit in the surface film
    Wet-How would I deliberately accomplish this.

    Would I add less or more deer hair dependant on how you wanted to fish the fly, or do you dress them all the same, and then alter the method of fishing them?
    I love the thought of a fly that can do everything. I realize that this will not be the only fly I will ever need, but I am glad I have discovered it.

    With regards to the type of deer hair. My tackle shop only had packets of deer hair. Whether it was early season, late season, mule or whatever I have no idea. It does however have a crinkle half way down so it can't be all that bad. I would say to novice fly tyers to not worry about this too much, start tying the flies, and when you (I) get more experience than you can source better materials.

    Now I need to find some more patterns with deer hair and CDC that I can try.
    Cheers
    Dom

  2. #12

    Default

    Dom,

    One more quick question.
    As I have experienced this is a very effective fly.
    You mentioned that it can be fished dry, damp or wet.

    Dry-I put some floatant on the deer hair only.
    Damp-Leave as is, and it should sit in the surface film
    Wet-How would I deliberately accomplish this.

    Would I add less or more deer hair dependant on how you wanted to fish the fly, or do you dress them all the same, and then alter the method of fishing them?

    I love the thought of a fly that can do everything. I realize that this will not be the only fly I will ever need, but I am glad I have discovered it.
    For those I want to fish as straight wets I use a heavier hook, and a sparser wing (I also select less hollow, less buoyant hair).

    For the standard CDC&Elk, unless casting to sighted or spotted fish, or prospecting likely places, try casting quarter downstream, allow it to dead drift and then swing it across the current as you would a regular wet fly. The fly will inch below the surface. Takes are generally quite agressive, and because the fly remains close to the surface, also quite visual. During the swing I would suggest you keep the rod angled up some 45 degrees which allows for some slack below the tip to cushing the impact of the strike. Fished with a tight line translates to you landing fewer fish, and having to tie many more CDC&Elk as replacements

    Now I need to find some more patterns with deer hair and CDC that I can try.
    For starters you may check out the following offspring the pattern has spawned, some from my hand and some by others. You can find them on my page:

    Diving CDC&Elk (step by step on my page)
    Spent CDC&Elk
    CDC&Elk Streamer
    Crippled CDC&Elk (Bruce Salzburg)
    or even the (found to be quite effective) Bonefish CDC&Elk (Paul Slaney)



    If you have not yet done so, you may want to peruse the article I wrote for Flyfisherman magazine on CDC the material, its history in tying and a number of CDC patterns. You can find it here:

    http://flyfisherman.com/ftb/hwcdc

    Cheers and have fun at the bench.

    Hans W
    Last edited by Hans Weilenmann; 14-07-2006 at 08:21 AM.

  3. #13

    Default

    Hans, I have found that the CDC Caddis designed by Marc Petitjean has the same fish catching abilities of the CDC and Elk. The all CDC design gives the fly that same mobility which is just lethal. Was wondering what your thoughts on that design were?
    Adam

  4. #14

    Default

    Adam,

    Once a CDC-only fly gets waterlogged it will sink. That is the reason why I perfer to combine the CDC barb mobility with the buoyancy of the deer hair. In my mind it is a more versatile, and more sustaining, combination when on the stream or on stillwater.

    Cheers,
    Hans W

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