Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  6
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1

    Default Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    I use a lump of beeswax on my thread for dubbing etc. (I get it free as both my wife & son are beekeepers!). However, I have seen some very well-respected tyers who post wonderful tying instructions online using "Tacky Wax" or similar. Is there any real advantage in this (I tie flies sizes #10 down to #22 as a rule) ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Not So Greater Manchester.
    Posts
    17,624

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    You don't have to worry about softening tacky wax, you can dab it on the thread or run the thread through it.
    With bees wax it can be soft or brittle. I think in the old days, bees wax was mixed with paraffin to keep it soft.
    If you've got a plentiful and free supple of beeswax, then stick with it (pun intended ).
    I have a wife and daughter. I'm always wrong and outnumbered. Hidden Content

    A Lancsy Lad. Hidden Content

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Shropshire & Mid Wales
    Posts
    8,513

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    I personally don't like using wax with dubbing, apart from touch dubbing spider bodies. Wax makes it difficult to reposition the fur when needed and can alter the fur also, taking the buggyness out of it.
    I much prefer just licking my finger to apply the dubbing.
    I do however, like using a hard wax on the thread at all other times, with bare thread wraps whilst starting the fly and binding down bunches of deerhair or hackle stalks. Creates a much stronger fly and prevents slippage. I know not everyone waxes thread these days, but I'm a believer.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  4. #4

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    There are literally dozens of different waxes available, many duplicate the work of others, but not all ! I can use up to 4 during in a complex dry fly, though that's rare. The same applies for trad salmon flies. Smaller stuff more often than not just the wax applied in manufacture.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    1,180

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    Poor quality materials and tools are destined to discourage beginner tiers and cause greater expense when the time comes to replace them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    devon
    Posts
    3,243

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    Wax on thread helps stop stuff from slipping and adds a little more friction so possibly less turns of thread are needed... Maybe.. Waxed thread doesn't allow varnish to soak in at the head so is less secure...Maybe.. Sticky wax, very sticky, really works for touch dubbing.. Def... 4 parts bees wax, 2 parts pine resin, 1 part lanolin (heat gently until resin melts to mix). Jus my 2pennorth worth..

    Dave.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    Cobblers’ wax kept warm in trouser pocket is fine for most applications and thread/silk runs through it well.
    Tacky wax ok for really bushy Hares Ear etc, but at a pinch, why not put small smear of marmalade on ones finger and thumb!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,831

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    I use tacky wax for dubbing and bees wax for thread, occasionally I use beeswax mixed with cobblers or crayon to get different shades, just melt them together.

    Al

  9. #9

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    I gave up using wax years ago. Sticky wax would somehow coat my finger tips. I seemed unsure if hard wax was coating enough. So I stopped using wax. My dubbing is fine. As previous contributors I lick my finger tips and twist on the dubbing in an anti clockwise direction. Each turn of the thread traps the dubbing on to the hook shank. No problems.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    kitchen
    Posts
    540

    Default Re: Beeswax versus "Tacky Wax"

    Quote Originally Posted by jimt View Post
    I gave up using wax years ago. Sticky wax would somehow coat my finger tips. I seemed unsure if hard wax was coating enough. So I stopped using wax. My dubbing is fine. As previous contributors I lick my finger tips and twist on the dubbing in an anti clockwise direction. Each turn of the thread traps the dubbing on to the hook shank. No problems.

    whats the long term effects ?of fingers being licked ,
    Dog lick leaves Greg Mantufel without hands, feet


    its a lottery
    Last edited by doobrysnatcher; 08-12-2018 at 11:53 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 15-12-2017, 06:20 PM
  2. Vintage~ c1920 ~ "Hardy Bros" "Patent Uniqua" 3 1/8" Fly Reel #1
    By EbayUK in forum Vintage fly reels for sale on Ebay
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 23-05-2017, 11:40 AM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 13-02-2013, 05:24 PM
  4. Learning about trout rivers DVD, survival guide and "cost" versus "value"
    By Paul G in forum General Fly Fishing Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 21-10-2012, 04:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •