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Thread: Parachute adams

  1. #31

    Default Re: Parachute adams

    There are several other considerations on tying a parachute fly.

    For parachutes, the direction of the fibers determines how low in the the surface film, the fly body will sit. I tie my hackle so the concave side is UP which causes the fly body to sit lower in the surface film. If you tie with the hackle fibers concave down, the fly body will be suspended higher in the film.

    Most fly fishers consider the parachute to be a dry fly, imitating the subimago or adult mayfly dun. However, the supporting hackle of a parachute is ABOVE the plane of the fly body and so the fly body is IN and NOT ON the film. The position of an emerger body is IN and NOT ON the film. The parachute is an emerger and NOT a dry fly. That is why the parachute is more effective than the traditional dry flies tied with palmered hackle.

    
Gary Borger has published a book called Fishing the Film in which he discusses the 5 stages of emergence and the patterns that imitate them. He places the parachute adams in stage 3 and the comparadun in stage 4. The Quigley Emerger and the Klinkhammer would be stage 2 flies. These "stages" are an attempt to describe what is a continuum of emergence as the insects transforms itself from a under water nymph to an above water insect. The lower the fly rides in and under the film, the earlier the transitional form of the emerger. So I tie my parachutes so they ride lower in the film, imitating a fly that is less able to escape.


    
Ask yourself, how would these flies position themselves?



    
Concave Down






    
Concave up





    Here are the proportions for a parachute I loaded off the internet. I personally think the wing is too tall for my taste.

    However, I post the photo because the fly has the hackle tied off on the post and the hackle is concave up so it will sink under the film. This is how I tie off the my parachute hackles because I want a lower body position. For the lowest riding fly, wrap the hackle CONCAVE UP and tie it off on the post.





    1. Tie tail fibers in first.

    2. Tie in post and wind thread up post to prep post for hackle or use the UV resin method below to set the post for the hackle.



    3. Prep, stack, and tie in brown and grizzly hackle. Post up the hackle, and bring thread back down post and take thread to tail.

    4. Dub the body to the post ALL the way to behind the eye leaving room for tie off. Thread hangs off the BACK side of the hook.

    The fly will now look like this. In this image the hackle is partially hidden behind the post.



    5. Wind hackles TOGETHER CLOCKWISE down the post. This avoids trapping hackle when you wind separately.

    6. On the last hackle wrap take it UNDER the THREAD that is hanging over the other side of the hook. Instead of holding the last hackle wrap behind the hook eye and taking the thread OVER the hackle, you have taken the hackle UNDER the thread which does the same thing and avoids catching the other hackle fibers that form the parachute. The weight of the bobbin will hold it in place. Now you can bend the post back toward the rear of the hook, holding any hackle fibers away from the area hook eye as you take a few more wraps and whip finish the thread behind the eye.

    Alternative method after step 4 above - whip finishing on the post.

    5. Take thread to base of post. Take a half clockwise wrap of thread AROUND the base of the post so that the tread now hangs on YOUR side of the hook.

    6. Wind hackles TOGETHER CLOCKWISE down the post. This avoids trapping hackle when you wind separately.

    7. At the base of the post, wrap thread around the hackle and post CLOCKWISE. Then whip finish at the base of the post.

    Here’s a video on whip finishing the hackle on the post



    Variation:

    You can also use the way Charlie Craven does it. He ties off on the post but whips behind the hook eye.

    Charlie ties left handed so you will need to look at it in the mirror to get a right handed view.

    The key direction is this image:

    Silver Creek- "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"....Szent-Gyorgy

  2. #32

    Default Re: Parachute adams

    Quote Originally Posted by silver creek View Post
    The parachute is an emerger and NOT a dry fly.
    How I look at it...

    Emergers are a type of dry fly, used when 'dry fly fishing' to imitate the low-riding emergent stage of certain insects. But then spinners are also types of dry fly used to imitate a different low-riding stage of certain insects.

    What you call a pattern is the name for the pattern, not the name for how you are fishing it. I use suspender buzzers when I'm dry fly fishing. To me there is no point in arguing about having different terms for how high-riding or how low-riding a dry fly is. Different insects ride higher and lower, and we imitate them when we are dry fly fishing. Terrestrial beetles blown into the water lie like an iceberg, with 90% of their bulk below the surface. They are not emerging; they are drowning. When I am imitating them with a fly that is static and floating, I am dry fly fishing. To me, if it is floating and static and imitating an insect, it's a dry fly. Simples! I am quite happy to refer to deer hair emergers, Klinkhamers, parachute patterns, etc as 'emergers', but there is no point in removing them from lists of dry flies or lists of flies you use when dry fly fishing. I tie mayfly spinners using parachute and paraloop patterns...


    A spinner is not an emerger - it's the complete opposite. It's a deader! You wouldn't call that pattern above an emerger, surely? So, what is it? It's a dry fly - like all the rest of the flies you fish floating and static to imitate insects. None of them are 'dry' anyway - they are all soggy and sit partly above, partly in and partly below the surface. I can't see any need to try and draw up rules based on the percentage that is above and below? What is important is identifying the times to fish higher riders and the times to fish lower riders, surely?

    I have one box with all my dry flies in it. That includes all the Klinkhamers, parachutes, ethafoam beetles, suspender buzzers, hoppers, Shipmans, comparaduns, sparkle-gnats, raiders, deer-hair emergers and all the rest that sit in the surface film with the Plimsoll line somewhere about their being.

    Just my tuppenceworth!

    Col
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

  3. #33

    Default Re: Parachute adams

    A spinner has spent wings and their bodies are on the film.
    Silver Creek- "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"....Szent-Gyorgy

  4. #34

    Default Re: Parachute adams

    Quote Originally Posted by silver creek View Post
    A spinner has spent wings and their bodies are on the film.
    This one has wings and tails on the surface film. Its body is partly above the film, partly in the film and partly below the film. Its head and its legs are under the film.


    I'm going to fish a parachute dry fly to imitate it.

    Col
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

  5. #35

    Default Re: Parachute adams

    Here is a crippled mayfly...


    It has done emerging, but has not made it into the air. As with the spinner upthread, it is partly above the surface film, partly in the surface film and partly below the surface film. It's just a question of how much is above and how much is below... like all the dry fly patterns we use.

    I could use this parachute dry fly to imitate it...


    And for emerging mayflies, I could use mayfly emerger patterns, such as these...




    They are in my box of dry flies too!

    Then there are the empty shucks...


    You surely can't call them emergers? The emerger has emerged and vacated the scene. They are lying mostly below the surface film. Fish eat them a lot. We imitate them with various low-riding dry flies.

    They are all dry fly patterns, used when dry fly fishing...

    That is just the way I call it and the terminology I use when communicating to others. I'm just pointing it out to make you aware that not everyone sees it the way you are calling it... as if it was a done deal, kind of thing. Just sayin'...

    Col
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

  6. #36

    Default Re: Parachute adams

    The way I see it, emergers are a stage in the life-cycle of some (by no means all) water-borne insects (which in turn are by no means the only insects trout eat).

    Dry-fly fishing is a tactic used to try to fool trout into accepting a static floating imitation as if it were a real insect. The word 'dry' in this respect has long since lost any bearing on the state of desiccation of the pattern being used, or on the position of the Plimsoll line on its side. Any pattern used for this tactic qualifies as a dry fly, including all emerger patterns.

    Therefore, to say a particular imitation is an emerger, and not a dry fly, is like trying to multiply apples by oranges. Does not compute!

    Col
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

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