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Thread: Thorax Dun

  1. #1

    Default Thorax Dun

    If you want a step-by-step for the Thorax Dun I posted a 23 frame article here. Click the individual images for detailed views. There are two versions of the article, one for right-handers and one for left-handers.

    If you like the article and would be interested in something not covered on FFR you can always email requests to me through the mail link on this page.

    Cheers,

    Raif

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    On the banks of the Derbyshire Wye
    Posts
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by killipso
    If you want a step-by-step for the Thorax Dun I posted a 23 frame article here. Click the individual images for detailed views. There are two versions of the article, one for right-handers and one for left-handers.

    If you like the article and would be interested in something not covered on FFR you can always email requests to me through the mail link on this page.

    Cheers,

    Raif
    Very nice fly Raif.

    If at stage 11 you dub at the front end without winding back down to the bend and then wind the body to the tail end, you can then include a hint at segments by ribbing the body back up to the front with open turns of the tying thread.

    richard
    Who resides on the right bank of the Derbyshire Wye and is lulled to sleep each night by the mutterings of the river, dreaming that "When the rivers and their inhabitants come first, we ALL win."

  3. #3

    Default

    Glad you liked the pattern. You're right of course Richard, what you suggest would make a nice variation. All those variations are amongst those things that make tying so endlessly fascinating.

    Just as a footnote - the example illustrated is to provide the standard dressing - though I acknowledge 'standard' is in fly dressing circles a relative term. At the same time it's a pretty standard dressing in the U.S.. The original Thorax Dun was dressed a little different, but I think I mentioned that in the piece.

    I should say as apoint of interest perhaps, that I rarely worry about segmentation on any small dry flies. However, I do include ribbing effects on larger patterns like the Green Drake.

    I tried some of those PhDs (re. FF&FT) that had a thread rib, but the fly worked just as well without. How do you find dries fish with and without the rib?

    Cheers,

    R

    Ps. …hope things are fishing well over on the Wye and Derwent. I've hardly had chance to fish over in Derbyshire since last October. Just a couple of grayling sessions and one trip at Mayfly time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    derbyshire
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    Default thorax dun

    what a great web site
    thanks
    cookie

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Sawtry, Cambridgeshire
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    Default

    Killipso, excellent photographs and attention to detail in the Tying Techniques section.

    I notice that when tying in Marabou tails and wings, that you don't strip the flue of the stalks first. This was one of the first tying tips I picked up on this forum, and it really seems to help in reducing the bulk under the head when tying marabou winged flies such as the Cormorant.

    Great site, now bookmarked.

    Graham.

  6. #6

    Default

    Hi WF,

    glad you like FFR.

    Not exactly sure but I think you mean stripping the flue/barbules off the ends of all the feather barbs before you tie them down? Tying marabou using the technique illustrated at FFR doesn't really produce so much bulk that it's an issue. However if it is a problem for anyone then the technique you refer to would help - it's just takes that bit more time. For anyone interested: Allowing the correct amount of space at the head and making a tapered cut when removing the waste should give a good profile for the whip finish. Using thinner and stronger thread helps; also, it's a common mistake to use insufficient thread tension and to use too many wraps, so they are things to keep an eye on. Hope these comments help.

    Happy tying,

    R
    Last edited by killipso; 24-06-2007 at 10:15 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by killipso
    Glad you liked the pattern. You're right of course Richard, what you suggest would make a nice variation. All those variations are amongst those things that make tying so endlessly fascinating.

    Just as a footnote - the example illustrated is to provide the standard dressing - though I acknowledge 'standard' is in fly dressing circles a relative term. At the same time it's a pretty standard dressing in the U.S.. The original Thorax Dun was dressed a little different, but I think I mentioned that in the piece.

    I should say as apoint of interest perhaps, that I rarely worry about segmentation on any small dry flies. However, I do include ribbing effects on larger patterns like the Green Drake.

    I tried some of those PhDs (re. FF&FT) that had a thread rib, but the fly worked just as well without. How do you find dries fish with and without the rib?

    Cheers,

    R

    Ps. …hope things are fishing well over on the Wye and Derwent. I've hardly had chance to fish over in Derbyshire since last October. Just a couple of grayling sessions and one trip at Mayfly time.
    The rivers are fishing very well but we have heavy rain forecast for the next two weeks so it could change. Frankly we need the rain.

    Ribbing... Yes I rib all my flies down to size 18. 20's down I don't bother. I also tend towards very thin bodies for anything representing Duns and Spinners (especially Spinners).

    richard
    Who resides on the right bank of the Derbyshire Wye and is lulled to sleep each night by the mutterings of the river, dreaming that "When the rivers and their inhabitants come first, we ALL win."

  8. #8

    Default

    Out of interest Richard, what skinny flies are your hot favourites? We're talking dries I'm assuming? My two 'must haves' used to be Blue Dun and Ginger Quill (thirty years ago) - the Ginger Quill being the absolute must have (still is one of my favourite traditional patterns). Fully dressed it works to cover several mayfly duns and nipping out the wings and clipping the hackle gives a reasonable spinner if you're caught short on 'proper' spinner patterns.... sadly I often am.

    Glad to hear the fishing is going well. You guys have done some effective habitat improvement work over the years too, so I guess things can mostly just get better. I'm surprised rainfall has been an issue - I was under the impression levels were generally OK - but it sounds like it's a good thing there's been so much rain of late.

    R

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by killipso
    Out of interest Richard, what skinny flies are your hot favourites?...
    Grey Duster with tails
    Kite's Imperial with and without the double wound thorax
    Pheasant Tail

    Poly Prop Sherry (PPS)

    richard
    Who resides on the right bank of the Derbyshire Wye and is lulled to sleep each night by the mutterings of the river, dreaming that "When the rivers and their inhabitants come first, we ALL win."

  10. #10

    Default

    Ah yes, the PT in all it's forms what a fly.

    Thanks Richard, I'll pass that on to a friend of mine who's thinking of trying the river again after nearly thirty years away. Knowing the patterns fished by successful locals is always encouraging

    Cheers,

    R

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