Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Belfast...
    Posts
    2,079

    Default Parachute Sedge/paraloop sedge

    I haven't did a step by step on here in ages, but i think i should just add this one as its been a real trout catcher!!!!

    I seen this fly in the fly tyers guild magazine a good while ago and i have been using them alot this season. Believe me this fly is more successful than a shipmans buzzer, basicly the parachute sedge is more like a two in one fly. Its got the shipmans buzzer effect and its also got the parachute hackle.

    The original was created by Hans Van Klinken, I can't really remember the name of the fly but i just call it a parachute sedge. This fly has is a big fish catcher and i have had plenty of good brownies on it.

    Im sure someone could tell me the real name of the fly, Im sure it was a paraloop sedge.

    So lets get started.


    Hook: Medium wire size 10
    Thread: Danvilles 6/0 olive
    Rib: Yellow thread
    Tag: Globrite Floss
    Dubbing: Seals fur, slf mix
    Tail and wing: Polypropylene yarn(tail coloured in with pen)
    Hackle: Well marked grizzly hackle






    Step1.
    Start the thread and work your way down between the barb and the point of the hook.



    Step2.
    Tie in the globrite floss for the tag and give the body and nice and even taper.


    Step3.
    Now tie in the polypropylene yarn from the eye end of the hookshank all the way down towards the tag, touching turns, Trim the tail end to size and give it a touch with permy pens


    Step4.
    Before you rush on make sure you tie in your rib before you dub the body, So select some nice seals fur and give the body a bit of life, give the rib 4-5
    turns. I use a rib on my dry flies because they last longer than a dry fly with no rib. It works!



    Step5.
    Now the body and the rib is in place. Tie in your hackle near the head of the fly and wind it around the poly yarn which you have left over. Give the hackle 3-4 turns around the post depending on how good your hackle is. Push your hackle downwards and then pull the yarn back towards the tail end of the hook.



    Step6.
    Your result should look like this, Spin the thread and do your whip finish behind the hackle. Trim the poly yarn to make the wing to size and enjoy. Very easy to tie and catches a real load of trout.



    Top view of the fly!!



    ENJOY!
    Cromie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    A Scot in Naas, Co. Kildare, ROI
    Posts
    996

    Default

    I'll be tying up a few of those, Matt. Nice work!
    Roddy

    "Sod it! I am going out to sink a klink!" Hidden Content

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kildare, Ireland
    Posts
    340

    Default

    Very nice sbs Cromie, and lovely fly.

    Im sure someone could tell me the real name of the fly, Im sure it was a paraloop sedge.
    Its Hans van Klinken Parapoly Sedge.
    http://www.danica.com/flytier/hklink...poly_sedge.htm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Belfast...
    Posts
    2,079

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by murtol View Post
    Very nice sbs Cromie, and lovely fly.



    Its Hans van Klinken Parapoly Sedge.
    http://www.danica.com/flytier/hklink...poly_sedge.htm
    Thanks for reminding me the name of the fly.
    Cromie

  5. #5

    Default good stuff Matt

    That's a sweet presentation, my friend

    Put tails on that and make the body red for a March brown spinner
    White body - it's danica
    etc

    thanks,
    Roy
    C & R since 1963

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Near Glasgow
    Posts
    2,378
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cromie;248335
    Step6.
    Your result should look like this, [B
    Spin the thread [/B]and do your whip finish behind the hackle. Trim the poly yarn to make the wing to size and enjoy. Very easy to tie and catches a real load of trout.

    Liked the tying.

    This is probably a basic question but could someone explain spinning the thread or post a link please.

    Cheers Donald
    Tight Lines. :)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Belfast...
    Posts
    2,079

    Default

    Spinning the thread is the most common thing i do in fly tying, Take a look back to the golden olides when the yo yo's came out. You spun the thread and it went smaller and made the yo yo spin, you spin the thread clockwise and it made the thread big and loose. Its just the other way round, Spinning thread in fly tying makes it easier to make finer wraps of thread and helps you split the thread for dubbing.

    Here is an example:
    If i had Danvilles 8/0 and i left the thread hanging from the hookshank for a while it would return to its oringinal state. Loose and wide, If you build up a head for a whip finish with the thread like this you will take up tons of space and probably create a "big head". So people spin the thread to make it finer, which will create a such smaller head in a smaller gap.

    Oh and almost forget, When tying salmon flies and competition flies, Spinning the thread is probably the most useful thing. You need to spin the thread to create really smooth tapered bodies. You will understand when you get to this point!

    If you look behind the hackle and infront of the wing where i did my whip finish, you can bearly see the thread, thats because i spun it anti-clocwise which made it really fine and tight!!

    This is just my own point of view, People will have different opinions. Some people spin it and some don't!
    Last edited by Cromie; 23-06-2008 at 11:32 AM.
    Cromie

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •