This came up in another thread, so I thought I would show the method I use for plain tinsel bodies. It makes for a very easy body, using only one wrap (no need to go down and up the hook to cover gaps). It is also very resilient, as each turn overlaps and traps half the previous turn and so protects it from being torn by fish teeth. They can make it dog-eared, but they can't break it.

It allows all sorts of metallised plastics to be recycled - crisp packets, confectionery wrappers, et al. My favourite piece is a silver lurex sheet about 6 feet by 6 feet that will see me out. It might have been made to be used for wrapping around marathon runners as they cross the line.

Start by cutting a strip off the sheet. You can simply cut with scissors or a razor blade or scalpel/craft knife. I find a guillotine good for giving nice straight edges and consistent widths. If using a guillotine, put the tinsel on top of a sheet of A4 paper backing...


I find about 4 mm wide is a good width for larger sized hooks, but don't go too narrow, or you will lose the overlap advantage.




Prepare it by cutting an angled end...


Tie it in with the angled cut away from you...


This ensures the first turn uses the cut angle to give a flush rear edge to the body...


As you start to wrap the hook, the angle of attack of the tinsel to the hook is quite acute, compared to the near perpendicular angle of a narrow tinsel...


Continue, to wrap, keeping the tinsel flat to the hook by stretching it slightly as you go, and covering approx 50% of each previous turn with each new turn. It's like applying one of those elastic bandages that have a black line down the middle as a guide.


As you reach the thread, pick up the thread and start to wrap the 2 together, so that the thread traps the tinsel without 'scrunching' it too much...




The finished job...


... and a fly tied using it...


I find 'Crunchie' wrapper gives a nice brassy gold (other tooth-rotting honeycomb confections are available )...


Col