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  1. #1
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    Default Ivens Green and Brown Nymph

    ...............
    Last edited by scotfly; 02-06-2013 at 05:06 PM.
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  2. #2

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    Thanks Scotfly for sorting this before I achieve "banned" status.
    Tom Ivens does not say how the green and brown ostrich herl is combined in his book, which is what has actually puzzled me up to now.

    He does make a comment though that although this fly looks drab to the naked eye, in water it takes on a translucense that has to be seen to be believed.

    Thanks for such a prompt response it is appreciated.



    Steve

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obadiah69
    Thanks Scotfly for sorting this before I achieve "banned" status.
    Tom Ivens does not say how the green and brown ostrich herl is combined in his book, which is what has actually puzzled me up to now.

    He does make a comment though that although this fly looks drab to the naked eye, in water it takes on a translucense that has to be seen to be believed.

    Thanks for such a prompt response it is appreciated.



    Steve
    One is glad to be of assistance
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  4. #4
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    Default

    never seen this before looks like a killer.

    also ostrich herl looks really good as a body.

    would be interested in any other nymphs using it?

  5. #5
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    Default

    It is a killer... on the end of my line anyway
    Another with ostrich herl.
    Hook -12-14
    silk -black
    rib -silver wire
    Body / thorax cover -grey goose
    Thorax - white ostrich herl

    Shh keep that one under your hat for use in may/ June on still waters
    All done

  6. #6
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    Aug 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scotfly

    Green and Brown
    Brown
    Green and yellow
    Green
    I don't know about the other two you mention, but the Green and Yellow is a much simpler fly than the Green and Brown you've just demonstrated so well.

    Tied on a #10 or# 12, no tail, body in two halves.
    Rear half green dyed swan (or goose) wound over wet varnish, front half similar but using yellow dyed herl.
    And of course Iven's favourite head of wound peacock - he certainly had a thing about peacock.
    Recommended to be fished slowly, preferably just a wind-assisted drift, near the surface.

  7. #7
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    May 2006
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    Default

    Another excellent Step by Step Scotfly
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  8. #8

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    Just tied a batch for next season Scotfly, I now understand what yourself and Tom Ivens mean.

    Would you use them purely as a sedge imitation or do you use them at other times please?


    Steve

  9. #9
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    Default Long Leader

    Hi Scotfly,

    quote-one on the point of a 25ft leader

    I am impressed,that is seriously long!


    Pete
    999 comp 2013 cancelled no sponsor
    New rainbow PB 22 lbs Bangour 23/10/2011


  10. #10
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    It's fair to say that I grew up as a fly fisherman as a result of Iven's book - I found it on the shelf of the travelling library that came to our village. The Green and Brown, Green & Yellow & Green nymphs always caught fish for me - never did any good with the Brown nymph - and with the Black & Peacock Spider these are classic patterns that would do well today.

    Iven's Jersey Herd caught me my first 'large' reservoir trout, a brown of 2.5lb in 1968. Some years later I had the opportunity to listen to a talk given by Tom Ivens at Coventry College and watch him fish at a Press Day at Draycote - there was something about him that made him 'special'.
    [I]"I still don't know why I fish or why other men fish, except that we like it and it makes us think and feel."[/I] Roderick L Haig-Brown

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