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Thread: soldier palmer

  1. #1
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    Default soldier palmer

    Hi
    could someone please give me a step by step for a soldier palmer.
    p.s i'm only a beginer

    thanks

    johnr

  2. #2
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    Hello Johnr,

    for a beginner you have picked a fly that requires several of the basic fly tying procedures - tags, dubbing, ribbing and palmered hackle. Although not complicated procedures you might find a little difficulty in the ribbing against the hackle but this is easily learned.

    I have to go out on business for an hour or two but when I return I will make up a step by step for you unless any of the other forum members point you in the right direction before then.

    Here is a link to detailed description of the Soldier Palmer -
    http://flytyingforum.com/index.php?a...ow&showid=3616
    Roddy

    "Sod it! I am going out to sink a klink!" Hidden Content

  3. #3
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    thanks for the link.yes this is the fly i'm looking for


    DUBBING!!! i havent tried tying a fly with this yet

  4. #4
    MarkH Guest

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    I think scotfly's SBS for a Red Palmer could also be used for a Soldier Palmer -

    http://www.flyforums.co.uk/showthread.php?t=6532

  5. #5
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    MarkH - took a look at Scotfly's fly but it is completely different so I will post this step by step here to help out johnr although I am nowhere near the same league of expertise shown by Scotfly's amazing talent.

    OK johnr - here it is, there is nothing in the fly that cannot be done with a little practice, one word of advice is always start big! Use a larger size hook before going for the likes of 14s & 16s. I have used a size 12 Capt Hamilton International ( the best ever hook!) for this example and you should be able to follow it easily, I hope!

    Materials:-

    Red Thread - I prefer Danville as it is quite strong and good for beginners too
    Tail - Red Wool or Red Floss - I have shown both tails in the step by step and finished the floss version
    Body - Red Seals Fur or Seals Fur Substitute
    Ribbing - Medium Oval Gold Wire
    Hackle - Red Game Cock Hackle
    Head Finish - either Red Varnish or a bigger head with SHHAN (sally hanson hard as nails nail polish - Boots etc or steal from your partner!)



    Whip an even layer of thread up to the start of the bend



    Tie in a short piece of bright red wool - not fluo



    Alternatively use a couple of strands of red floss



    Catch in the end of the gold tinsel



    Waxing the thread makes it easier for the seals fur to stay in place or you can learn to use dubbing loops



    Taking a pinch of seals fur, tease it out and twist it onto the waxed thread, if you find it is a long way from the hook just slide it up nearer - you will get the hang of dubbing quickly



    Wind the dubbing rope towards the head of the fly but tie off clear of the eye area



    Now select a hackle with fibre length equal to the hook shank length or just longer than the hook gape and tie in behind the eye



    Using hackle pliers form 2 wraps behind the eye before winding down the body in evenly spaced turns



    Now is the time to bring your third arm into play! Holding the hackle tip in the pliers as shown wind the ribbing around the hook twice to secure the hackle before winding up the body in the opposite direction that you wound the hackle while waggling it to avoid trapping the hackle fibres at the same time - makes sense?



    When you are near the head you can release the hackle tip and run the rest of the ribbing to behind the eye area in front of the two hackle turns and catch it in




    At this point you can trim the ribbing and hackle tip carefully and whip finish the head before applying either red varnish or SHHAN over the tying thread - either would do but SHHAN gives a nice shine and allows the thread to glisten



    And now you have your Soldier Palmer fly best fished as a top dropper on a team of three on the water of your choice!

    Last edited by Albannach cuileag; 16-02-2007 at 11:28 AM.
    Roddy

    "Sod it! I am going out to sink a klink!" Hidden Content

  6. #6
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    Thanks
    theres a couple of things i'll have to buy before i try this.
    i'll post my results when i get them.
    p.s will i be able to use artic fox fur as dubbing?

  7. #7
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    In a word? No!
    You need to get the right materials or substitutes for tying a specific fly.

    It takes a while to build up your materials but when you start it soon accumulates as every fly tier in here will attest to! For some of us it is a hobby for others it is a passion but for all of us it is the pleasure to see the finished article. There is no feeling like that of hooking a fish on a fly you have tied and the first is always the best no matter what size it is.

    Good luck with it!
    Roddy

    "Sod it! I am going out to sink a klink!" Hidden Content

  8. #8
    MarkH Guest

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    Thanks for another excellent step-by-step.

  9. #9
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    Another nice step by step Albannach cuileag (AC from now on ) of a variation of the Soldier Palmer. There are a few variations on them and the Red Palmer in my step by step, if you add a red tail, is one of them. you can also tie it with a red wool body.

    I would like to add to the word "no" you gave in response to Johnr's question re arctic fox as dubbing. As I read his question he is asking if arctic fox fur can be used as a dubbing, my answer would be yes, but you would need to prepare it properly first. If he means can he use it as a dubbing for the Soldier Palmer, my answer would still be yes, with the proper preparation, but it would not be my first choice as a dubbing material for this fly.

    Johnr, you may find this step by step on dubbing techniques useful.

    http://www.flyforums.co.uk/showthread.php?t=2296

    Don't forget to post the results Johnr
    AC... more please
    All done

  10. #10
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    I should have twigged with the avatar that you have, it is the same on both sites. Nevermind, fame at last though!

    As with all flies there is a progression in the tying as new materials become available but if you think back at the time of the original, they did not have much to play with as we do nowadays and who knows what the future will bring to fly tying?
    Last edited by Albannach cuileag; 16-02-2007 at 09:11 PM.
    Roddy

    "Sod it! I am going out to sink a klink!" Hidden Content

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