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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    cork, ireland
    Posts
    1,113

    Default "new zealand" style

    I've tried this approach (dry fly with a nymph suspended below) a nuber of times but alway come up blank - yet catch reasonably consistently using a dry only so i'm fairly sure it's my technique rather than lack of trout is the cause. One of my difficulties is in deciding the length of tippet from the dry to the nymph - any users of this technique care to share a few tips
    steve

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    central scotland
    Posts
    677

    Default

    Not been using the method long only since the start of the season so i know your troubles.

    I find that using about 10-12" works best for me, Reason being you tend to see alot of the fish that go for it ,Managing to hook them is a whole other problem

    Youll also spend alot of time changing flies, I always make sure that when i lift off my nymph is directly under my dry, if it isnt i change to a heavier nymph. Then youll end up changing the dry cuz it aint bouyant enough. Alot of messing about but if you fish the same river alot youll soon get used to what works. I carry a tub of Orvis sink putty and add it to the head of the nymph if i only need a little extra weight, Either that or a little split shot.

    As i said ive only been using this method for a short time and some will probably disagree with some of the things ive said but i find these work for me. Stick with it, its a great technique once you get used to it
    Scott

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    cork, ireland
    Posts
    1,113

    Default

    cheers scott
    the rivers i usually fish have quite wide variety of depth and current speed - would you constantly change nypmh depth and/or weight in these circumstances?
    steve

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    central scotland
    Posts
    677

    Default

    If theres no fish showing I do change the length to try and find them. If theres fish showing i leave it quite short as id imagine the fish are holding higher in the water. If theres a lot showing i take the nymph off and try to match the hatch. I dont bother covering alot of fish with the nymph on but do cover the odd one if their is only a few rising
    Scott

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cork
    Posts
    1,934

    Default

    I have tried it a few times, the only major success I got was on the Lee during the evening rise, but I dont think the method increased my catch that night as the fish were just simply 'on' so any method would do. I have fished it a few more times on smaller rivers and I can see its benifit as killing two birds with one stone, dry+wet, but I cant say for certain it increase's the over all catch on the day.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    The Wild West of Dymock
    Posts
    6,208

    Default

    I find this an absolute banker method and have devised my approach with advice from people that know far more than me.

    The trick with fishing the duo is to give the nymph as natural a presentation as possible, therefore a nice long tippet section is by far the best. Say 2.5 - 3ft. If your nymph snags the bottom, lighten it. You will find that you get a lovely drag-free drift and plenty of fish
    "I would love to live like a river flows, carried by the surprise of its own unfolding" John O'Donohue

  7. #7

    Default

    I've used it from time to time with mixed success..nothing startling.

    However, on Monday I tried it using a trick I picked up for rising but picky fish. They were coming up occasionally for something minute on the surface.

    I tried the "snickers bar" method of giving them something different..in this case a big Humpy. They were coming up, looking, not believing what they were seeing and going down again!

    Then I remembered this trick, shown to me by a guy at Willington.

    I tied on a Diall Bach, about #16, six inches or less below the Humpy. Up they came, saw the Humpy, turned away and saw the DB. "AhHa, that looks more like it" they said and took it!!
    Roy

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    cork, ireland
    Posts
    1,113

    Default

    Thanks guys - some interesting approaches there

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Stockport
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I fished in NZ for a few days last year & my guide's technique was to use two nymphs below the dry fly. First nymph a size 14 weighted, the second a size 18, either not weighted or very lightly so. The bottom nymph was only 6 inches or so below the first nymph. All the fish (up to 5.5lbs) were caught on the lower nymph.

    The 'dry fly' was a cricket/hopper variant with a foam body and unsinkable...also known in most circles as a float.

    The americans call it hopper/dropper/copper, as classically their lower nymph is a copper john.

    The guide had a really neat knot for the dry fly which allowed him to adjust the depth quite quickly & I think Jon Beer covered this in an article in T&S recently. do any forum members know the Knot??

  10. #10

    Default

    Hi Roy,

    yeh I do something similar ..its my "hail mary" method when nothing else works and i'm just about to call it a day....I tie on a popper with a diawl bach / buzzer NZ style about 18" below.
    I pull two or three short tugs with longish pauses...Usually they seem to get curious about the popper but take the dropper.
    It does work suprisingly well but they do get wise to it pretty quickly.....I find It'll either work right away or it wont work at all.

    If you havnt got a popper a booby or a big muddler (anything big that floats) will do.

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