Thanks Thanks:  11
Likes Likes:  113
Page 9 of 21 FirstFirst ... 789101119 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 209
  1. #81
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kinglassie
    Posts
    964

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    [QUOTE=Cap'n Fishy;2592289]

    Again, I put it to everyone reading this thread... find a suitable term for fish like the ones in Post #63. They were stocked, but I'm not for calling them 'stockies'...

    I'm 100% with you Capn I call them ''residents'' and have been hunting them out on dries for a long time.
    Tight Lines.
    Brian.

  2. #82

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    I don't know about a suitable term, but I think of them as "educated".

    By learning enough to survive in their surroundings, evade predators and maintain/improve their condition. Plus, on a C&R water, by being caught, surviving and learning something from the experience.
    Last edited by smallmouth; 22-10-2019 at 08:07 AM.

  3. #83

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    Quote Originally Posted by Capeldrae View Post
    I'm 100% with you Capn I call them ''residents'' and have been hunting them out on dries for a long time.
    Good man! Welcome to the club!

    Col
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

  4. #84

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    Quote Originally Posted by tangled View Post
    What's wrong with naturalised?
    Quote Originally Posted by tangled View Post
    Technically it's not quite right...
    Well, you've answered your own question there.

    You can call them naturalised or whatever else you want. Everyone is free to call them what they want to, or not call them anything if they never come across them in practice. Me and my mates and others like Capeldrae have been calling them 'residents' for decades so we are sure as Hell not going to be changing now!

    I was asking because I was interested to see if anyone was calling these fish anything in particular, but it seems that most folk either don't encounter them - and so don't have an established word for them, or they are folk like Capeldrae and my mates who call them residents.
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

  5. #85

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    Quote Originally Posted by thetrouttickler View Post
    A stocked trout is a stocked trout, and will forever remain that.
    Of course it is. No one is suggesting otherwise.

    Quote Originally Posted by thetrouttickler View Post
    The term "stockie" is pejorative. Think of the phrase "stockie-bashing". It signifies a recently released naivete or innocence making them easy to catch. Like clubbing seal pups...

    There does come a time, precisely when I don't know, when a stockie gains a certain "street-smart" in its new environment. It gets wiser to the ways of its dangerous new world. It "acclimatises" or becomes "conditioned" or "adjusted".
    Exactly. Add in it losing its flabby fish-farm fat, mending its ragged fins and skinned nose and replacing its missing scales and getting itself fit as any wild fish. Add in it learning what real trout food is - insects and crustaceans and molluscs and fish, rather than the pellets and fag-ends and stones and feathers and weed that 'stockies' favour. These are the fish that me and my mates and others appreciate the challenge of going chasing. They are in every respect, other than their origins, much closer to wild fish than to fresh stockies. This is why we recognise the difference between a 'fresh stockie' and a 'resident'. So, we need different words for them when talking about them. A stocked trout is a stocked trout... except when there are obvious differences between them!

    And there is an education element involved. It is quite obvious from some of the comments I have read on here over the years that there are people who look down their noses at all rainbow trout, and think of them all as being the same flabby, raggedy-finned, pellet and fag-end-eating, non-entities. They see them as easy to catch, and beneath their dignity to fish for. I'd like to take them out for a day on Menteith at mayfly time and show them what rainbow trout are capable of becoming, given a bit of time to sort themselves out.

    Quote Originally Posted by thetrouttickler View Post
    I prefer the term acclimatised. Perhaps in a fishing sense the word "seasoned" works best. It rolls off the tongue better too. A seasoned fish of course becomes harder to catch than an innocent "stockie".
    That's fine - use whatever term you choose. I was interested to know what terms others are using. As I said, me and many others have been using the term 'resident' for decades, so we won't be changing.

    Col
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

  6. #86

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Fishy View Post
    Well, you've answered your own question there
    Sure, but if you're asking for another word that is more accurate than resident, then it qualifies. Resident just means something that lives there - tells you nothing about how long they've lived there. All the fish in the lake live there :-)

    Naturalised tells you that the resident is a blow-in that's settled and acclimatised to the new environment.

    But I'm not arguing, resident is fine by me. Once it's explained what you mean by it everyone understands.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    1,298

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    I'm really interested to know how long rainbow trout can survive in stillwaters in the UK.

    I have read they only live for something like 5 years in the wild, a shorter life than brown trout.

    Where I come from, where winters are not as severe, it can be several years after stocking. But I gather here just making it through a winter can be a mortal challenge.

    Surely winters in Siberia where rainbows are native are even more harsh though?

  8. #88

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    Quote Originally Posted by tangled View Post
    Sure, but if you're asking for another word that is more accurate than resident, then it qualifies. Resident just means something that lives there - tells you nothing about how long they've lived there. All the fish in the lake live there :-)

    Naturalised tells you that the resident is a blow-in that's settled and acclimatised to the new environment.

    But I'm not arguing, resident is fine by me. Once it's explained what you mean by it everyone understands.
    Sure - I'm not claiming it's perfect in any way - it's just the term we started using back in the 1980s it probably was - and it has stuck with us - and with words that stick - you're stuck with them, for better or for worse!
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

  9. #89

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    Quote Originally Posted by thetrouttickler View Post
    I'm really interested to know how long rainbow trout can survive in stillwaters in the UK.

    I have read they only live for something like 5 years in the wild, a shorter life than brown trout.

    Where I come from, where winters are not as severe, it can be several years after stocking. But I gather here just making it through a winter can be a mortal challenge.

    Surely winters in Siberia where rainbows are native are even more harsh though?
    Aye, good point. I suspect it is a rare event to have a stocked rainbow survive in the wild for more than 2 years and that even 2 years is a rare event. Plenty survive for one year. We have our own club water that we stock with rainbows. It has a head of wild browns that rarely grow to more than 12 ounces, on account of it is an oligotrophic upland water with poor feeding. The rainbows can survive the winter OK, but they struggle to maintain body condition, as even fish of 1 lb 8 oz are above the weight the water would produce naturally. I fished it in March this year, before the first stocking of 2019, and I had 8 or 9 of last year's rainbows...




    But even by June, we were still catching last year's fish in good numbers...


    The tip of its pectoral is just about level with its dorsal!

    Back in the early 90s, Loch Leven, a eutrophic water, experimented with rainbows. There was an extraordinary couple of seasons when they were stocking with fish of around 1 lb 4-8 oz that were being caught the following year at 5 or 6 lb, and still some the year after that, which came out at 10 lb or so. The usual source of fast food on Leven is daphnia, but a lot of those fish got large on dying perch fry - there was a big die-off from perch disease that year.

    This is about the only rubbish photo I have of any of those fish (a 1 year-wintered fish of about 6 lb)...


    The clue to growth rate was in the fact that a study showed that the wild brownies in Leven grow at a faster rate than brownies in a fish farm! And as we all know, rainbows grow much faster than browns.

    We were catching those 5-6 lb fish on dries and they were running 50 yards of line off us! Mad stuff! No doubt some folk would still call them 'stockies' and look down on them...

    At Menteith, we sometimes catch a rainbow that we can tell is an 'old' fish, in rainbow terms. They look different to the others. They've obviously been in the water a good length of time. They are often a brighter colour with a lot of yellow in them. They tend to be thin - all head and fins. You can tell they are starting to 'go back' and don't have long to live. It would be interesting to get a scale reading on them to find out how long they have been there.

    Here is one from May of this year - doesn't really show what I am getting at very well, but I remember the fish and being able to tell it was an old one, not long for this world...


    Again, no doubt lots of folk would dismiss it as 'just a stockie'...

    Hard to be sure about lifespan in the wild, due to rates of being caught and removed, cormorant predation, disease, etc...

    Col
    Last edited by Cap'n Fishy; 22-10-2019 at 11:31 AM.
    Please note that any views expressed in this post may be those of the
    originator and do not necessarily reflect those of the reader.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Monmouthshire
    Posts
    2,839

    Default Re: Is Float-Fishing Now de Rigueur?

    Quote Originally Posted by thetrouttickler View Post
    I'm really interested to know how long rainbow trout can survive in stillwaters in the UK.
    There's a small fishery near me that used to stock on a Thursday. During the school holidays, surviving until they closed the gates that evening was a remarkable achievement
    https://fishingfortrout.blog

Page 9 of 21 FirstFirst ... 789101119 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Vintage Drennan 'STICK FLOAT' 13ft Carbon Fibre Match Float Rod - VGC.
    By EbayUK in forum Vintage fly rods for sale on Ebay
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-07-2019, 09:00 PM
  2. Vintage 3 piece split cane float rod Edgar Sealey Nu float refurbished fine
    By EbayUK in forum Vintage fly rods for sale on Ebay
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-01-2019, 08:20 PM
  3. Drennan Series 7 13ft tench float / specimen float rod - great condition
    By EbayUK in forum Vintage fly rods for sale on Ebay
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 28-05-2017, 04:21 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-05-2017, 12:40 PM
  5. Float tubing venue / 1st float tube
    By BENDINO in forum Trout and Grayling Fishing
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-03-2015, 07:49 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •