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Thread: A Fisherman's Guide to Fishing Photography Part 3

  1. #21
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    Fantastic work chaps! I'm sure there will be fantastic results posted on future threads following your clear and informative help!

    Many thanks!

  2. #22
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    Brilliant thanks, very useful.
    Cheers
    [I]"The fish and I were both stunned and disbelieving to find ourselves connected by a line." William Humphrey in "The Armchair Angler"[/I]

  3. #23
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    Default Top Draw

    I am a Keen photographer and that is as good as i have seen in explaining what its all about...
    Well done and i have learnt a thing or to i did not know..
    Thanks
    Glen
    Hidden Content

    The true riches are to be found in an angler's soul, not his wallet.

  4. #24
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    Default Me snapping Col snapping Jim......

    For every great shot of a great big wild brown, theres an angler left brickin' it, and fending for himself


  5. #25
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    A big thanks to all the lads who helped put this together, very helpfull and i am sure will get there one day!
    It looks like it will be expensive though to be able to take great photos, think i best do some research on what kind of setup to get to start off with!
    Thanks again,
    Baz
    Lintrathen Fly Fishers

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigtroot View Post
    A big thanks to all the lads who helped put this together, very helpfull and i am sure will get there one day!
    It looks like it will be expensive though to be able to take great photos, think i best do some research on what kind of setup to get to start off with!
    Thanks again,
    Baz
    Hi Bigtroot, and thanks to you and all the others for the feedback. For sure, it can get expensive if you decide to go the whole 9 yards - as can so many pursuits, but it doesn't need to be expensive to get great photos. Our guide was designed to show folk that a bit attention to technique, plus some sound kit was all that was needed. I've recently been helping some work colleagues to get themselves sorted out with digital SLRs, and they are all going for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th generation ones by Canon and Nikon that are coming up on eBay, as the 'enthusiast' and 'semi-pro' photographers upgrade their cameras to the newest models.

    My first digital SLR was a Canon 10D (2002 technology), which I bought in 2004. That was superceded by the 20D almost immediately , then the 30D, and by the time the 40D came out in 2007, it was enough of an improvement in spec to persuade me to upgrade. However, all I left behind in the 10D was that it was a bit slower, it wouldn't give such a good print at A3 size (who prints at A3? ) and the rest of the improvements are all involved with user-friendliness, not image quality.

    So, folk like me who are now upgrading to 50Ds and 7Ds (yes, the 40D is already a bit outdated!) are putting their 10Ds and so on up on eBay and they are selling for 100 quid or so, because the enthusiasts/semi-pros are not really interested any more - they've moved on. But these cameras will so totally outperform compacts in terms of your ability to take a quality photo with them that they are ideal for first-time dSLR users. And that's just the big metal-bodied Canons. You've also got the 'entry level' Canon range, which started with the 300D, then the 350D. And you have the Nikon equivalents (sorry, but I can't comment on Nikons, save to say they are every bit as good! ) (Other makes of dSLR are also available )

    Many will be up on eBay with a kit lens to get you started. One of my mates bought a 10D with an 18-200 mm Tamron lens for 150 to get him started, while another bought a 30D body for 250, which he paired up with the lenses he still had from his Canon film SLR. They have not looked back.

    The alternative to the dSLR is to go for a compact, and again it is simply a case of combining good basic technique with the ability to control the situation, rather than shoot with 'auto-everything'. Look for the ones that give you 'PSAM' or similar on the control dial. You'll not be able to control depth of field the way you can with an SLR, and I personally would not be able to get the action shots with one, but they are perfectly capable of producing high quality images.

    Col

  7. #27
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    Default Spam?

    How the heck did 'this guy' get under your radar? Can't tell, but I assume it was a first post.

  8. #28
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    Thumbs up

    Very impressive thread, hats off to the authors

  9. #29

    Default Re: A Fisherman's Guide to Fishing Photography Part 3

    All 3 parts very well written and illustrated. Week done guys!

  10. #30

    Default Re: A Fisherman's Guide to Fishing Photography Part 3

    What a fantastic detailed guide to photography

    I will have to read this a few times before it even starts to sink in

    But excellent

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