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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Holmfirth
    Posts
    165

    Default Thinking of having a go: Part 2 1/2

    Hi
    As previously mentioned I am going to build a rod this Autumn/Winter.
    What I really want/need is an 8ft 5 wt. I love fisihng with my 7ft 4wt, but find that grayling bugs/heavy nymphs have the habit of thwacking me in the back of the head, hence the slightly longer/heavier rod. I also really like the idea of a 4 piece. That way it could fit in my daysack.
    So do I dive straight in (bearing in mind that I have had the offer of help from a more experienced board member to help build it) and get the 4 piece 8ft 5wt kit from hook and hackle, as my first build, or do I also order
    http://www.mailordercentral.com/hook...number=AF9053K
    and use this as a practice. I don't really need a 9ft 5wt, BUT you never know, and you can never have enough rods (and for about 25 seems a bit of a bargain).
    Cheers
    Dom
    Going back to Dom's original question on this discount kit. I have placed an order this evening for the kit plus a bag and some extra thread and 2 part epoxy to practice with.

    I'll report back when it arrives, how long it takes and how much the final shipping cost is.

    Pat (Hudbarrel) I have ordered some clour preserver too. I wil be having a go at feather in lays.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Swindon
    Posts
    71

    Default

    Nice one !

    I've just been over to the USA for a friends wedding and was hoping to catch up with Russ from GoldenWitch while over there but we just couldn't quite get the logistics sorted, shame as he is a master and I had a 1000 questions for him !
    You MUST post a photo of your efforts, I'm going to have a go myself soon and will do likewise. Also let us now what feathers you decide to use, again, I haven't had a chance to look into this yet but will be taking a trip down the fly tying section of my local shop very soon to see what I think may work.
    Very best of luc to you.
    Cheers
    Pat

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Holmfirth
    Posts
    165

    Default It's Arrived

    Well the kit has arrived.


    Ordered September 1st, delivered October 2nd.

    Delivery was $29 including the Kit some extra epoxy and a rod bag.



    Comes with the basics of everything I will need to build it.


    The cork handle needs reaming out to fit the blank, so I will have to order a rat tailed file from somewhere. Any suggestions anyone?

    So I got the whole kit for around 40. Worth the risk for my first attempt. If all goes well I will spend a bit more on the second go.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Hampshire UK
    Posts
    110

    Default

    The cork handle needs reaming out to fit the blank, so I will have to order a rat tailed file from somewhere. Any suggestions anyone?
    The cork sands very easily. A piece of coarse sandpaper wrapped around a length of dowel works quite well. Otherwise any cheap file will do.

    Have fun

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberos
    The cork handle needs reaming out to fit the blank, so I will have to order a rat tailed file from somewhere. Any suggestions anyone?
    The tapered reamers sold by Guides & Blanks do a very good job. Measure the blank to see what size you need.

    http://www.guidesnblanks.com/product.php?product_id=195

    Or, spiral wrap some 1/2 wide glass paper round an old rod.

    Ream the grip out to a tight fit, rough up the blank where it will be glued and use the glue (Araldite slow does a good job) to lubricate it to slide on fully.

    Ian

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    heathrow
    Posts
    1,509

    Default

    Nip down to a hardware store or diy jobby and get a course round file, it only took me five mins to ream mine.A few tips form my first build might help you along the way.
    1.find a space away from everybody to work
    2. take your time
    3. i found using a bobbin holder far easier than any other method for wrapping guides.
    4 cut thin elastic bands to hold guides on
    5.get the wife and kids to eat Mr Kiplins small apple pies, wash and rinse the tins, great for epoxy
    6.always warm epoxy bottles up before use and measure very accuately
    7.practise first, you dont get a second chance
    8. check and check again that your guides are in alignment
    9 use epoxy for the tip ring, i used 2ton , hot melt glue was a pain
    10 file those guide feet down and the underneath to make sure they are flat
    11 get yourself some cheap plastic knifes, they are great stirers, cut the spine and surrated edge off with scissors, just to make things easier
    12 use cheap kiddies paint brushes, the plastic ones .cost 99p for ten or more
    13 good old wilkinson sword blades are excellent for cutting thread, be gentle
    14 if you have a sticker with your kit, if it isnt crystal clear, dont put it on ,it will stand out like a saw thumb, and if you write on the blank make sure its clean first and let the ink dry for atleast 24hrs before you epoxy over it

    There are more tips ,but i dont want to spoil the fun you will have im sure there will be many questions, ive made mistakes and im still trrying to put them right but i have a good rod and have enjoyed building it , lessons have been learnt
    If in doubt, get the montys outHidden Content

    Intelligence is relative to your environmentHidden Content

  7. #7
    jan Guest

    Default

    Please please dont use epoxy for your tip ring - unless you want to shorten your rod every time you need a new one -and rings do get broken - use hot melt - cut a thin sliver and stick it in the tip ring tube, warm with a lighter until it melts, stick on to tip and hold for a few seconds whilst it cools - job done - never had one move - even on tarpon and heavy sea rods.

    1/8" masking tape is a much better way to hold the rings in place imo

    for perfect thread tension - chuck the spool on the floor, then take the thread over your seat cushion to the blank and sit down - turn the rod in your building frame with one hand and the tension will be just right with the friction provided by your weight (make sure the cushion on your chair is cloth not plastic!) - you can tape a paint brush or similar to the chair leg at the back to put the spool on if you dont like it rolling around and gathering fluff - or make more advanced spool holding devices.

    beware second hand mixing cups - its very easy to contaminate epoxy and end up with a disaster - i speak from personal experience
    Last edited by jan; 06-10-2006 at 07:04 AM.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jan
    Please please dont use epoxy for your tip ring - unless you want to shorten your rod every time you need a new one.
    I've managed to get Epoxied fittings off by heating the outside of the fitting with a lighter or small blow torch. The Araldite I use burns off before the cane/carbon burns - just before! so you have to be careful.

    Ian

  9. #9
    jan Guest

    Default

    me too, but i've also melted rod tips - better safe than sorry - your sage looks sorry when the tip section is 1" shorter than the others - dead giveaway! not that i have been daft enough to damage an expensive rod in this way, but it doesnt hurt to use a safer way

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Swindon
    Posts
    71

    Default

    Good luck with both the build and the inlays.

    've been a bit busy lately and haven't done much myself but I did have a practice go on an old bamboo but section using grizzly saddle feathers (which are suitably long and thin) and the blue portion of a jay wing and the coours stay true with or without preserver. When I've done the real thing I'll post a pic.

    Cheers

    Pat

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