Thanks Thanks:  2
Likes Likes:  4
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11

    Default Re: Practice Rod - a 10 ft #6/7 Old Graphite Rebuild

    Hi Lewis

    I've never sanded after first coat but always trimmed any bumps or dimples with half an old razor blade (I also use one of these to trim thread tags when they've been tucked/pulled under when wrapping


    Try thinning first coat with acetone or cellulose thinner (just a few drops) so it soaks alongside ring foot and after a night on the Turner I leave mine in the airing cupboard through the day to dry properly - no sticky finish that way

    Looks good though

    Richard

    Sent from my SM-J510FN using Tapatalk

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
    Posts
    1,242

    Default Re: Practice Rod - a 10 ft #6/7 Old Graphite Rebuild

    Thank you, Richard. I've been using a Stanley knife blade on the tags so far but that has to be fresh to get a clean cut. Tbh, I've been using disposable razors and electric shavers for so long I'd forgotten about double-bladed safety razors! I'll pick some up.

    The 'thinner' method has been suggested before but adds the possibility of a sticky cure, as you and Splinters say ..... I think I'll give it a go on my next practice rod and weigh up the pros and cons with the particular epoxy I'm using. When warmed, Flexcoat Lite runs very freely - it's already 'light' as it is, so I don't know if I want/need it any thinner ....
    The proof of the pudding, and all that.

    I thought I'd seen a hardener/epoxy/acetone ratio of 1/1/1 suggested somewhere but given F L's fluidity that sounded like far too much solvent to me. ''A few drops'' sounds far more reasonable. I suspect the amount added will vary depending on the epoxy product used and I imagine that might differ greatly from using varnish, too? Only one way to find out, really.

    I've now made some decals for this rod which I'll attempt to add today. I bought transparent decal sheets which should look clean when applied. The text, in 'ivory', should be legible and stand out but I know from prior attempts that images tend to disappear when placed over a black black. This time I've inverted the contrast of the image I want to use, making blacks white & vice versa, in the hope it will stand out more - or at least be visible! I've added a colour to what was monotone in the hope that helps .....
    Rather than sit here struggling to explain it I think I'll go and do it!

  3. #13

    Default Re: Practice Rod - a 10 ft #6/7 Old Graphite Rebuild

    Hi Lewis

    I use flexcote lite too but find 1-2ml of each component and a few drops of acetone or cellulose thinner spot on - I mix it in foil bun cases so you can warm over a candle if you want it runnier! Not too close though or you get microbubbles coming like a froth to the top !

    There's several ways to success and you've got to just find your own way that works for you

    Will have to post my next build on here

    Richard


    Sent from my SM-J510FN using Tapatalk

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
    Posts
    1,242

    Default Re: Practice Rod - a 10 ft #6/7 Old Graphite Rebuild

    Thanks, Richard, I'll give it a go soon. I used ally foil shaped into a saucer on this one - very similar to your method and easy to warm like you say. I haven't tried cooking it, though! I look forward to seeing your next build.

    I failed with my decal attempt today. The film did not sit smoothly on the blank. Perhaps because of the lacquer I sprayed on to the decal to hold the colour when soaking and applying? It lay there slightly bumpy so I removed it. It would be fine on a flat surface but not on the curve of a fly rod. Further, despite applying almost too much ink for the decal paper to take in the printing process (absorbency issues leading to blurring of text) the bright yellow colour still wasn't strong enough to be seen over the black blank behind.

    I abandoned the transfers for now and drove to the local post office where I bought a silver paint pen in 'Medium' size. Got it home and the nib is far too big! I'll buy a 'Fine' pen tomorrow and learn how to write on a tube. Hate my handwriting, though - left-handed smudginess abounds.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Co. Armagh.
    Posts
    1,486

    Default Re: Practice Rod - a 10 ft #6/7 Old Graphite Rebuild

    I've started to suffer self doubt. I've long been a proponent of not thinning but have seen so many examples of people having success that I started to doubt my memory. So I went back to find the source of my dogma. Needless to say I can't find the original text ( it was a long time ago). But the rodmakers listserve did turn up the following.

    Roughly correct - with this difference: it does not increase pot life, and also does not delay curing. It will get trapped in the curing/cured layer if used in excess or if applied in too thick coats. Acetone trapped in cured epoxy will significantly change the properties of the cured material, which can remain soft and sticky for a significant length of time. It will eventually evaporate after slow diffusion, after which the coat should be similar (enough) to ’normally’ cured epoxy, but either this would prohibitively prolong curing time before a rod can be used (or sold), or if the rod were used before the coat is finally cured, you run the risk of damaging the still soft and sticky coat, from handling, or it may pick up lint and grime.

    So, acetone is a useful diluant of epoxy, but only for applying very thin coats, from which the acetone can evaporate before the epoxy cures. I would personally only recommend it for initial coats on wraps, where the intention is to soak the wraps, not to build a coat on top of the wraps. Once uniformly soaked, any subsequent ('high build’) coats should be made with unthinned, or only marginally thinned epoxy.


    Oh, and BTW - as general remark, mixing Flex Coat type epoxies intended for guide wraps/general rod finishing, that are formulated to remain (somewhat) flexible) is much more critical than straight epoxies (glues, resins). Reason is that FC types contain not only resin and hardener, but also a plasticizer, which generally is part of the hardener component. With normal epoxies, too little hardener results in a soft resin, while too much hardener is not such a problem, the resin will be somewhat harder (and stronger) than anticipated, but unless in critical applications, this doesn’t harm too much. Not so with FC types - too little hardener, and the epoxy stays soft, too much hardener, and the epoxy stays soft too, from the excess plasticizer (don’t ask how I know this). So accurate mixing, preferably by weight, is important.


    ==========================Heisenberg was right!========================
    | Dr. Henk J.M. Verhaar | |


    So I throw myself on your mercy and say I was wrong---ish and that if you want to thin you should thin. But only in fine layers so that evaporation isn't blocked, and not too high a thinner to epoxy ratio.
    There, conscience clear now,go for it.

    Simon.
    Dear Santa, I've been bad...It was totally worth it, stick your present.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
    Posts
    1,242

    Default Re: Practice Rod - a 10 ft #6/7 Old Graphite Rebuild

    Simon, my admiration and respect, Sir.
    To quote the other Shakey;

    ''You do so grow in my requital as nothing can uproot you.''
    ('All's Well that Ends Well'').

    Or, if you prefer, ''Cheers!''

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. My first rebuild
    By scott1967 in forum Rod Building
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 28-01-2016, 11:50 PM
  2. Salmon rod butt section rebuild....maybe!
    By Mac78 in forum Rod Building
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-07-2011, 07:29 AM
  3. Rod Rebuild
    By lochinloch in forum Rod Building
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 27-07-2010, 07:40 PM
  4. Hinduvine rebuild
    By Riverphish in forum Rod Building
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-06-2009, 02:54 AM
  5. Repair or Rebuild????
    By ROVER in forum Rod Building
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-06-2006, 02:18 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •