7wt Reservoir Rod

chukka

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I'm looking for a new all round reservoir rod 10ft 7wt.

I'm a reasonable caster and rod must be capable of handling a Di7 yet have a reasonably delicate tip to be able to nymph. I used to own a pair of Dismondbsck VSRs and liked these but after recently getting the bug again and back into trying I'm looking for something new, I prefer a fastish action but with the ability to handle a team of flies.

Choice between:
Loop sx
Cortland Competition Lake 2
Hardy Zephrus
Hardy Wraith
Airlite V2
GR80
Snowbee Prestige Graphene

What are the pros and cons of each, any others to add to the list?

Thanks
 

speytime

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Weight isn't as straightforward as it might appear on paper, what makes a rod feel heavy or light is the way the weight is distributed.
The rod with the lightest top sections will feel lightest even if the gross weight is more.

Al
 

speytime

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It's down to leverage, the set up weight is constant, now imagine turning it around and trying to hold the reel 9/10ft away?

Al
 
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Gerryb

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Scotty 90 on here had an Orvis Helios 3D 10' #7 for sale a while back, might be worth contacting him , a sound guy to deal with.
 

PaulD

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Weight isn't as straightforward as it might appear on paper, what makes a rod feel heavy or light is the way the weight is distributed.
The rod with the lightest top sections will feel lightest even if the gross weight is more.

It's down to leverage, the set up weight is constant, now imagine turning it around and trying to hold the reel 9/10ft away?


The bottom 1/3 of a trout rod, reel and line is always heavier than the top 2/3. Why would an 8oz rod 'feel lighter' than a 6oz rod?

If it's 'down to leverage' then weight distribution as mentioned in your first paragraph is also constant and when operating a lever, and a fly rod is not strictly a lever, the predominance of the mass is still in the bottom third.
 

speytime

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All being equal the rod with the lightest top sections will feel lightest.
If you swap a 4wt reel to a 5wt reel you won't notice the difference, but you take the excess weight of the 5wt reel and put it in the top eye it will feel like a substantial weight.

Hence the distribution of the weight being more important than gross.

The greys gr50 on paper is a good bit lighter than a agility 2 but in your hand the agility is lightest, weighing the sections tell why this is, the weight is missing from the greys butt section where its almost irelevant.
Eta its referred to as swing weight i believe?

Al
 

PaulD

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Al, you are 'confusing' a number of issues, predominantly confusing a 'sense of lightness' and the calculation of 'swing-weight'.

Swing weight is about Moment of inertia (MOI). MOI is resistance of an obeject to rotational acceleration. Greater MOI requires more torque to achieve the same rate of angular acceleration. So, the greater the MOI of a fly-rod the more force (torque) is needed to cast or manoeuvre that rod.

Have a look at this . . .
 

speytime

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Paul I think it's refferd to as swing weight, maybe it's not?
Here's a question, what makes one rod feel lighter than another of the same weight?

Al
 

PaulD

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Here's a question, what makes one rod feel lighter than another of the same weight?
Al
When you pick it up in the shop, when you're walking the bank or when you're casting with it?

The odd thing is, I have a lot of rods, probably over 100. I have I think, six 9ft, 5wts, I'ver never weighed them, I've never held two at the same time to 'feel' which is 'lighter'. It's irrelevant.
 

speytime

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Namely when you're fishing with it but also when you pick it up in the shop.
i used 10/11ft rods and any excess weight was much more noticeable, any weight difference in 9ft rods is less noticeable and less again with 8ft rods.
Here's another way to consider it...
If you imagine a level 10ft rod and you place 10g at 8ft then try 10g at 10ft the weight at 10ft will feel heavier?
weight closer to you doesn't have the same leverage effect.

Cheers Al
 

tangled

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ration. So, the greater the MOI of a fly-rodHave a look at this . . .
Really useful reference, thanks. That's obviously far too useful to be adopted by the indistry. Why would anyone want to standardise a measurement that would allow us to compare rods objectively?

Just glancing at the table in the conclusion, rod length is having a very large effect. (Explicable I guess because the calculation uses the square of rod length.)

Our man would therefore be better with any 9’6” instead of 10’ if it's low swing weight he's after.
 

speytime

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Think of the handle, the bit you hold not the full cork length as the fulcrum point ;)
That goes without say, what makes you think I'm meaning the full handle?
Only the piece in your hand is the fulcrum, weight in front of the fulcrum is relevant, the further from the fulcrum weight is the more its exaggerated.
Eta
The dependence on distance from the axis is quadratic, so MOI
increases with the square of distance to the axis of rotation. The following will
generally be true:
• Long rods will have higher MOI than shorter rods of similar build.

Al
 
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PaulD

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Really useful reference, thanks. That's obviously far too useful to be adopted by the indistry. Why would anyone want to standardise a measurement that would allow us to compare rods objectively?
But . . . and it's a BIG BUT . . . something to consider is that unlike Golf, Tennis and Cricket where we can measure effective swing weight because we swing a club, a racket or a bat to hit an object, a Fly Rod, it's action, components, reel, and line all contribute to the weight with a combination of movements contrived to produce what we call the ‘casting action’. What we are referring to as "swing weight" is actually a static weight, and that a true swing weight is unmeasurable as an assigned number for a rod alone because the other components are too big a variable.

In other words ‘swing weight’ as a unit of measure in rod only comparisons is a useless number because it is inordinately effected by the weight of the rod, the line, it's taper, the amount of line out, and the action of the rod. For instance a line that overloads a rod or too heavy a reel will effect ‘swing weight’.
 

tangled

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Sure, there are other components - casting is a system, but that shouldn't stop us measuring what can be objectively measured. Swing weight makes quite a difference to how much effort you need to move the rod through the air so in principle it's a useful thing to know.

I wonder whether there are circumstances where a heavier swing weight (for a give rod length and weight) is an advantage?
 
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