A wonderful sight.. But what is it..?

ohanzee

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You can tell real country folk by what they say and think ohanzee
I'm not sure I qualify as proper country person anymore but its a hard balance nowadays, farmers are continually being told they are damaging the environment by people that spend most of their life eating twice their carbon footprint in meat:)
 

ohanzee

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Water kills them if they drink enough of it... What I'm saying is its not dangerously poisonous like what's being suggested.

Al
Technically it is very poisonous, and will kill cattle if they eat enough, but its rare in that farmers know and eradicate it, cattle are too expensive and tightly regulated to expose them to ragwort so livestock are unlikely to come in contact with high levels of it.
As regards the OP ragwort is on the government 'get rid' list, farmers can be ordered to reduce it.
 

speytime

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Technically it is very poisonous, and will kill cattle if they eat enough, but its rare in that farmers know and eradicate it, cattle are too expensive and tightly regulated to expose them to ragwort so livestock are unlikely to come in contact with high levels of it.
As regards the OP ragwort is on the government 'get rid' list, farmers can be ordered to reduce it.
I don't know what farmland you walk on but where I am ragwort isn't unusual around grazing cattle.
Somewhere many will know is the banks of the Clyde at Liberton, the upstream field at wolfclyde Bridge, its hardly a plant that cattle aren't exposed to.

Al
 

ohanzee

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I don't know what farmland you walk on but where I am ragwort isn't unusual around grazing cattle.
Somewhere many will know is the banks of the Clyde at Liberton, the upstream field at wolfclyde Bridge, its hardly a plant that cattle aren't exposed to.

Al
True, along the Clyde is mostly sheep, and where they have cattle they mix them with sheep to keep the weed down, in small dozes it does little harm, its been controlled this way for eons.
It is toxic to cattle though and if it gets out of hand they can be forced to control it.
 

Gdog

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When I was around 7 years old the last work horse on our farm died after eating ragwort. I think my father had seen it, cut it and thought he had removed all of it but Dick (our horse) found a bit he missed.
 

ohanzee

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When I was around 7 years old the last work horse on our farm died after eating ragwort. I think my father had seen it, cut it and thought he had removed all of it but Dick (our horse) found a bit he missed.
That paragraph reveals how much things have changed, bout the same age I remember a retired old plough horse being given a bit exercise with a plough before they ploughed it over with an old Ford tractor.
The same field is done in hours now, cropped and turned, plough set by computer, air con and and hands free phone, remarkable.
 

aenoon

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I'd say the millions of acres of cattle pasture cleared of ragwort would be far and away more significant than an increase in horse riders.
Dunno about that being the only cause. Way back in summer of 1966 was helping out at a riding stables with my cousins, we spent 4 to 5 hours everyday removing ragwort from all the adjacent fields!
We were given 1 hours pony trekking as payment for said labour.
regards
Bert
 

ohanzee

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Dunno about that being the only cause. Way back in summer of 1966 was helping out at a riding stables with my cousins, we spent 4 to 5 hours everyday removing ragwort from all the adjacent fields!
We were given 1 hours pony trekking as payment for said labour.
regards
Bert
Not the only reason, just probably responsible for more than horses given cattle cover a lot of field area in the UK.
 

Paul_B

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The one in the picture is a burnet moth, the caterpillars that eat ragwort are cinnabar moths, ragwort is a poison to most if not all livestock.
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Ragwort. In the Westcountry there is without question more o it growing now than there was in the 1970's or 1980's.
There appears to be no shortage of it in Sutherland or Uist either.
 

codyarrow

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Ragworts everywhere in the north highlands. Cattle graze in the same fields. Farmers do not seem to be that concerned.
I have seen people pulling it - but seems to be more horsey people.
 

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