A Wonderful, Wild, Wensum Brown... or is it?

bobmiddlepoint

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Absolutely it's the absolute growth rate that is important but in some circumstances wild browns can grow nearly as fast as farmed ones and it's not always really obvious which scales are which.

I know a fisheries biologist who tried to read the scales of brown trout from the Uist machair lochs. I can't recall what he said about the first year of growth but thereafter he said it was very difficult to spot the winters in some of the scales. The machair lochs are shallow, have good feeding, and being on the edge of the Atlantic are hardly ever very cold in winter so many of the fish just keep growing year round.


Andy
 

Lewis Chessman

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I know a fisheries biologist who tried to read the scales of brown trout from the Uist machair lochs. I can't recall what he said about the first year of growth but thereafter he said it was very difficult to spot the winters in some of the scales. The machair lochs are shallow, have good feeding, and being on the edge of the Atlantic are hardly ever very cold in winter so many of the fish just keep growing year round.


Andy
Hmm .... That just confirms my suspicions that all Uist trout are farmed.
Yours, acidly,
Lewis.

;)
 

Hardrar

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I asked my youngest Son, about BT genetics, he has PHDs in both Marine and Animal Zoology.(A scary thing to do, as his answers can take hours) He normally works with Sharks and Rays, but in his long winded way, like every boffin, he said BT are used a lot in piscine genetic studies, as they are the most genetically diverse species currently known.
As an example, the Marbled trout of Central Europes Soca system etc., are closer genetically to our Atlantic Western European BT than the Adriatic Brown trout which they used to live alongside- Atlantic BT were introduced into these central River systems, for Sporting reasons, but sadly they are very close genetically to our Atlantic strains, so hybridisation occurred widely and without a massive effort, pure Marbled trout, would have become extinct. They are thought to be only present on the Soca now.
 

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