Absolute Beginner my first build..

Lewis Chessman

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Mar 16, 2008
Messages
2,605
Location
Isle of Lewis
Hi, Gary. Best of luck with your winter project!
I think the best tips have already been suggested but I'll mention my favourites.
Start preparing your jig and turner(s) now. They're not tricky to make and require, what?, a saw, a drill, screwdriver & nails, a ruler and sandpaper plus off-cuts.
I got my first turner motor from me mum's dead microwave and my second only this summer from a skip at work. I'll be needing to mount that 2nd before Christmas myself so could do a walk through with pics if it'd help you?
Turning rigs aren't essential but they're easy to make and make like so much easier during the epoxying stage, esp. when dressing several sections at one time. When you're hand-turning 'done sections' whilst epoxying the whippings on others ..... well, it's a little like juggling whilst spinning plates, I find! Electric turners give a smoother finish than my hand turning, I think, so worth the effort of making.

Take some time thinking about your rolling table. It can be as simple as a cardboard box with scissor-cut 'V's, a saucer and book for the thread tensioner, but you've time to make yourself something better which makes your life easier and the job more enjoyable. The book method does work OK but I found that the nylon whipping thread would pick up tiny particles of paper from passing through the pages and these then pollute the final wraps with wee, trapped specks. I've made a portable (easily collapsed and stored) table for when I'm away from home and have my main, homemade table in Lewis. Both were simple to make from scraps and are comfortable and easy to work with. If you look through old build posts here you'll get a few ideas on the options available to you from the photos, I'm sure.

I know you'll be practicing on a blank section or the bottom of the butt but suggest you look around for a rubbish old rod, fly or spinner, etc., and rebuild that first, even if only re-ringing it with the same old rings, just to get your eye and hand in and to practice epoxying a whole section at once. At the end of it you'll have a usable rod and some confidence for the Main Event.

Finally, remember this is your rod. If you don't like the way it turns out - for whatever reason - you can pick up a razor blade, strip the whole thing back to the blank and redress it until it looks like what you dream off. Nothing is set in stone, even after the epoxy has set!
 

GEK79

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Joined
May 10, 2021
Messages
1,596
Location
Ireland
Hi, Gary. Best of luck with your winter project!
I think the best tips have already been suggested but I'll mention my favourites.
Start preparing your jig and turner(s) now. They're not tricky to make and require, what?, a saw, a drill, screwdriver & nails, a ruler and sandpaper plus off-cuts.
I got my first turner motor from me mum's dead microwave and my second only this summer from a skip at work. I'll be needing to mount that 2nd before Christmas myself so could do a walk through with pics if it'd help you?
Turning rigs aren't essential but they're easy to make and make like so much easier during the epoxying stage, esp. when dressing several sections at one time. When you're hand-turning 'done sections' whilst epoxying the whippings on others ..... well, it's a little like juggling whilst spinning plates, I find! Electric turners give a smoother finish than my hand turning, I think, so worth the effort of making.

Take some time thinking about your rolling table. It can be as simple as a cardboard box with scissor-cut 'V's, a saucer and book for the thread tensioner, but you've time to make yourself something better which makes your life easier and the job more enjoyable. The book method does work OK but I found that the nylon whipping thread would pick up tiny particles of paper from passing through the pages and these then pollute the final wraps with wee, trapped specks. I've made a portable (easily collapsed and stored) table for when I'm away from home and have my main, homemade table in Lewis. Both were simple to make from scraps and are comfortable and easy to work with. If you look through old build posts here you'll get a few ideas on the options available to you from the photos, I'm sure.

I know you'll be practicing on a blank section or the bottom of the butt but suggest you look around for a rubbish old rod, fly or spinner, etc., and rebuild that first, even if only re-ringing it with the same old rings, just to get your eye and hand in and to practice epoxying a whole section at once. At the end of it you'll have a usable rod and some confidence for the Main Event.

Finally, remember this is your rod. If you don't like the way it turns out - for whatever reason - you can pick up a razor blade, strip the whole thing back to the blank and redress it until it looks like what you dream off. Nothing is set in stone, even after the epoxy has set!
Many great tips from. Yourself and others thanks all kindly.. Once jut arrives will update and ask questions.. Thanks Lewis.. Would be brilliant to see some of your pieces of kit.
Gary
 

Jason 70

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Jan 3, 2020
Messages
535
Location
The congested SE
Jeeez lad I'm the least handiest human to exist..

We could be brothers then Gary, I'm useless at anything handy. If I change a lightbulb without breaking the glass I'm well happy. I'll look out for this thread, and wish you well. You have more balls to have a bash at it than I have.
 

GEK79

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May 10, 2021
Messages
1,596
Location
Ireland
We could be brothers then Gary, I'm useless at anything handy. If I change a lightbulb without breaking the glass I'm well happy. I'll look out for this thread, and wish you well. You have more balls to have a bash at it than I have.
Balls are useful I've been starting to wonder is this above my league lol.. I'll try once using the pointers and advice here worst case I end up with something that didn't quite work..
Best case I have a beautiful rod and a new addiction lol... ๐Ÿค”๐Ÿค”๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜‰
 

beetlebum

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Joined
May 20, 2011
Messages
528
Location
Chorley
Balls are useful I've been starting to wonder is this above my league lol.. I'll try once using the pointers and advice here worst case I end up with something that didn't quite work..
Best case I have a beautiful rod and a new addiction lol... ๐Ÿค”๐Ÿค”๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜‰
My first build was by no means pretty, I rushed it because I wanted to get out fishing with it so the wraps were bloody awful. I love it to fish with though Gary, it's a learning curve...my second was slightly better๐Ÿ˜‚
 

GEK79

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May 10, 2021
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1,596
Location
Ireland
My first build was by no means pretty, I rushed it because I wanted to get out fishing with it so the wraps were bloody awful. I love it to fish with though Gary, it's a learning curve...my second was slightly better๐Ÿ˜‚
I have 3 months to get it right.. Tho I have a few rods I can use if she isn't ready.. ๐Ÿ˜œ๐Ÿ˜œ
 

splinters

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Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
2,167
Location
Co. Armagh.
I've been starting to wonder is this above my league lol..
Famous author and rodmaker Hoagy B Carmichael said, "A good rod is one you make with only nine screw ups to fix."

It isn't above your league if you can stand up and chew gum at the same time. Anyone can learn to do this.
Before I made my first rod I genuinely couldn't hang a shelf straight. It's all about practice and not rushing, no different to casting or fly tying. Be prepared for mistakes, they will happen. My own list of f**k ups is impressive, I don't screw up very often these days but...........
I've glued reel seats on upside down and back to front. I've finished a rod and realised that I've left the sliding band off a cap and ring seat. I've proudly shown a nice bamboo rod to a potential customer and then delaminated it back into it's individual strips with three false casts because I'd got the glue mix back to front. The only thing holding it together was the guides and ferrules. Never saw him again. The list goes on, it's the dues you pay for lack of attention. But all of these mistakes and others are fixable. Short of actually breaking the blank anything can be fixed. So don't worry, take your time, pay attention to the details and enjoy yourself. You can do it and you will love it.
When you get the blank let us know what you have and we'll guide you through the process. There's lots of help on here.


Simon.
 

GEK79

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Joined
May 10, 2021
Messages
1,596
Location
Ireland
Famous author and rodmaker Hoagy B Carmichael said, "A good rod is one you make with only nine screw ups to fix."

It isn't above your league if you can stand up and chew gum at the same time. Anyone can learn to do this.
Before I made my first rod I genuinely couldn't hang a shelf straight. It's all about practice and not rushing, no different to casting or fly tying. Be prepared for mistakes, they will happen. My own list of f**k ups is impressive, I don't screw up very often these days but...........
I've glued reel seats on upside down and back to front. I've finished a rod and realised that I've left the sliding band off a cap and ring seat. I've proudly shown a nice bamboo rod to a potential customer and then delaminated it back into it's individual strips with three false casts because I'd got the glue mix back to front. The only thing holding it together was the guides and ferrules. Never saw him again. The list goes on, it's the dues you pay for lack of attention. But all of these mistakes and others are fixable. Short of actually breaking the blank anything can be fixed. So don't worry, take your time, pay attention to the details and enjoy yourself. You can do it and you will love it.
When you get the blank let us know what you have and we'll guide you through the process. There's lots of help on here.


Simon.
As always Simon many thanks.. And all. M
 

bonito

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Joined
Dec 30, 2011
Messages
163
Location
Uddingston
Already been said, take your time, cleanliness, patience and I`d also add don`t be to keen in getting flashy, get the basics correct, flashy can come later but it catches nothing but anglers. I`ve made my fair share of screw up over 55+ years full time building inc. (as above) reel seats upside down through rushing, guides on back to front through rushing and many more. Always happy to help out if you are stuck, remember no question is dumb if you don`t know the answer.
 

GEK79

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Joined
May 10, 2021
Messages
1,596
Location
Ireland
Already been said, take your time, cleanliness, patience and I`d also add don`t be to keen in getting flashy, get the basics correct, flashy can come later but it catches nothing but anglers. I`ve made my fair share of screw up over 55+ years full time building inc. (as above) reel seats upside down through rushing, guides on back to front through rushing and many more. Always happy to help out if you are stuck, remember no question is dumb if you don`t know the answer.
Many thanks again.. Will get the kit in January.. And see where it takes perfection doesn't happen first time.. And if it did I would wonder.. Thanks again..
 

codyarrow

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Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
5,152
Received a replacement section for a four piece salmon rod. Whipped up the new section and epoxy applied.
Pretty good - put the rod together on the bank and discovered I had one section whipped with a completely different thread colour. :LOL: Which it still is!
 

JayP

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Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
3,957
Location
St Neots, Cambs
Received a replacement section for a four piece salmon rod. Whipped up the new section and epoxy applied.
Pretty good - put the rod together on the bank and discovered I had one section whipped with a completely different thread colour. :LOL: Which it still is!
We've all been there ๐Ÿ˜‚
 

glosterboy

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Joined
Apr 24, 2017
Messages
139
Location
Gloucester
Be prepared to fettle the guides, mini grinder, sandpaper or whatever, if you want them to be easy to wrap. The smoother the transition from the blank the easier it'll be.
In my experience you get what you pay for. I've found with REC and snake brand guides I've had to do next to nothing with them, not all guides are supplied to the same tolerance.
 

GEK79

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Joined
May 10, 2021
Messages
1,596
Location
Ireland
Be prepared to fettle the guides, mini grinder, sandpaper or whatever, if you want them to be easy to wrap. The smoother the transition from the blank the easier it'll be.
In my experience you get what you pay for. I've found with REC and snake brand guides I've had to do next to nothing with them, not all guides are supplied to the same tolerance.
Many thanks.. Will chat with the lad I'm buying the kit from..
 

Rhithrogena

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Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
2,825
Blimey! Jigs, epoxy, and turners galore...
No need for any of this to enjoy your first build Gary. You can easily whip rings on to the rod whilst watching telly!! Have a practice on any old bit of bamboo cane; spin it in your fingers with one hand and hold the spool of thread in the other. Small bits of tape are useful for holding the thread when starting a whipping, and for tapong rings in place, oh and a sharp knife for cutting the thread. I recommend not messing with epoxy for your first go, but to use varnish sparingly; and smooth each coat in with your finger whilst spinning the blank with your other hand. Three or four coats will be great. The huge advantage is that you can easily cut varnished whippings off again if you mess up or need to change/move a ring. Epoxy became the finish of choice for mass-produced rods because it is a one-coat affair: varnish is much easier and traditional, pmease consider giving it a go No need for a 'turner' either because it goes off quickly. Cheap yacht varnish is fine. I have used high street clear nail varnish for repairs many times, too. It may or may not darken the thread, but you have the option to use a colour preserver, if needed....
 

topconker

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Joined
May 17, 2009
Messages
389
Location
Salisbury
Hi Gary, I put up a series of blogs when I first started building, you might find it useful to have a look through them. They show the good and bad experiences and a couple of tips I learned along the way.
TC
 

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