Absolute Newby!

Toeboe

Member
Points
1
Location
Liverpool
Hi all
I have for many years loved the idea of fly fishing as It's always looked to me to be a more engaging aspect of the sport, not to mention the idyllic locations. I can already hear counter claims from the coarse fishermen lol.
Anyway I have decide as I'm due to retire this year I shall take the sport up. This is where it gets tricky, apart from browsing the internet, I am a complete and utter day 1 starter!
I haven't got a stick of equipment and don't know where to start. So to say I'm looking for some beginners advice would be an understatement. I have had a bewildering wander around my local Go Outdoors though lol.
I'm on the verge of enrolling in a beginners 1 day course at Midlands Fly Fishing, which seems to me to be a good place to start, is reasonably priced and only an hours drive south from me.
So in a nutshell, I need some advice lol
 

Mrtrout

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
England.
Where will you be fishing, rivers or stillwaters?
Welcome by the way, you’ll learn lots on here.
S.
 

Toeboe

Member
Points
1
Location
Liverpool
I'm guessing by that there is a different rod for each. I'm probably thinking more for rivers, although I guess it could be both.
Thanks for the welcome S
 

Mrtrout

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
England.
In general your set up for rivers can be much different, rods tend to be a bit larger with heavier lines for lures etc, not always but generally.
Rivers it will depend on size, small streams to big rivers, some fish with 7ft rods up to 9ft, so we need to know what venues you intend to fish at to advise you properly.
its an expensive minefield out there for rods and reels.
S.
 

mrnotherone

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Monmouthshire
Even if money is no object it's easy to buy stuff you later find you don't need or want because you fine tune the fishing you enjoy. Spend some money on a casting lesson and then if it's rivers you fancy looking at, book a day with a guide making sure you explain you are a complete beginner. A good guide will provide all that you need and get you started. Money well spent and you can then build up the kit you need over time. Good luck.
 

Toeboe

Member
Points
1
Location
Liverpool
Thanks for all your input guys, plenty of useful info so quickly. I think the day course before any purchasing seems the way forward.
T
 

Juneau

Active member
Points
3
Casting lessons first and foremost and you'll need more than one plus a few hours of practice in the local park if you can put up with kids asking if you've caught anything yet! When you have mastered the casting and your tackle you will be ready to launch yourself upon the unfortunate trout! Don't rush into buying kit without advice from a trusted source and always try before you buy. Your eventual casting style and rod preference will be different from mine so you need to get it right first off. For example I have a rather sharp, snappy casting style which suits a tip actioned rod. You might develop a more relaxed style which will suit a rod with a softer action.
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Points
18
Location
South Northants
Being a 'new starter' is both exciting and bewildering in equal measure because 'fly fishing'is such a broad church - large reservoirs, small still waters, tiny streams and broad rivers. Then there's the quarry, trout, grayling, sea trout and salmon, pike and other coarse fish, saltwater too! All very specific and very challenging, often with very different tackle and techniques.

Starting with an introductory course is a great idea which will give you an insight into the skills and equipment needed for the type of fly fishing that appeals to you. I started on the fly fishing 'journey' when I was 16, more than 50 years ago, at a time pre computers and internet, mail order shopping was a new experience, reservoir and small still water fly fisheries were in their infancy. 'Advice' was Tom Iven's book, Still Water Fly Fishing, first published in 1952, and the beginnings of columns in Angling Times . . . very different from the blizzard of well intentioned 'advice' that assaults us today! Fly fishing is a personal adventure, there's a lot of learning to do that happens 'on the water'. Days can be challenging, rewarding, frustrating . . . with every emotion in between. Good luck, enjoy your adventure!
 

Toeboe

Member
Points
1
Location
Liverpool
Brilliant advice guys. I'm a caravan owner and I'm heading to the lake district at easter for a week or so. Hopefully I may have enough basic information by then to embarrass myself on windermere or coniston. I also have a kayak so I know the quieter easy access points of the lakes.
If I use those lakes as a starting point then would that make it easier for more specific advice?
 

jaybeegee

Well-known member
Points
18
Location
Yorkshire
Welcome to the forum Toeboe. You could do a lot worse than the Lakes for your first foray into flyfishing. Ullswater is my personal favourite, but I don’t know how it fishes early season. We have forum members up in Cumbria who may be able to advise.
B
 

Mrtrout

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
England.
Welcome to the forum Toeboe. You could do a lot worse than the Lakes for your first foray into flyfishing. Ullswater is my personal favourite, but I don’t know how it fishes early season. We have forum members up in Cumbria who may be able to advise.
B
I fish Ullswater from March onwards, it fishes quite well early season, from a boat is best, casting in towards the shore line where most fish will be found.
Best to fish at least two flies or a team of three if possible.
A 9 or 10 ft rod #4 is fine, most trout average less than a pound but they are feisty little devils, and always the chance of a slightly bigger one, you may catch the odd perch as well.
It isn’t the easiest of fishing but rewarding at times.
S.
 

tangled

Well-known member
Points
38
Can't think of a better place to start fishing than the Lake District but it's best to start with help. Geoff Johnson is a guide up there he'll give you casting instruction, equipment and guiding all day long on Ullswater or the river Eden. And he's a really nice guy.

 

Toeboe

Member
Points
1
Location
Liverpool
Great advice from you guy once again, cheers.

I'm thinking I'd make my first attempts from the shoreline rather than the added complications a boat may or may not bring. Would that then mean a rod more than the 10ft previously mentioned would be the way to go.

I'm avoiding the reels and flys questions for now, but I'm expecting that to be a challenge too lol
 
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