Aftm rating

pikecatcher

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Is it the case that a fly rod with a higher AFTM will have more power when playing a fish?

For example I have AFTM 5 and 8 nine foot rods.

I intend to fish for salmon and Sea Trout on a medium sized Scottish river, apart from casting, will they both perform the same if I get a good fish on?
 

taterdu

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What you need to appreciate is that the combination of a rod and a line is a 'delivery system' . If you intend to deliver size 10 and 12 flies a 5wt system will do you well . . . depending upon how, where and what you're fishing for. My largest fly caught salmon came on a 9ft 6in, 7wt but I was fishing for sea trout. Would I recommend a 9ft 6in, 7wt for salmon fishing . . . generally speaking, No!

A 'good' fish is a difficult concept . . . just how big is a 'good fish'? If I was intending to fish a highland spate river then I'd be happy with a 10ft, 7/8 weight.
 

black knight

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The 8 weight line rod will give more resistance when playing a fish than a 5#.

But rods are designed for purpose. I have a Sage 9 foot 5# for most stillwater fishing. If fishing for sea trout my 10 foot 8# would be the rod of choice. For salmon fishing on wide rivers I use 12 .5 foot or a 15 foot fly rod rated 10#. For small stream type rivers fishing for brown trout I have a 7 foot 3# rod.
 

bobc

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Of course they will perform the same, whatever a good fish is. Tight lines. :thumbs:
The line rating is the same as a casting weight rating ,allied to the power of the rod.
They will perform the same for casting although the larger line weight will carry larger lures
However, you will never control a large fish caught on a light line rod as easily as a higher rated rod .
Trout are generally caught in open water , you can let them run to tire them out and a light rod will eventually land them , in a water with snags like a river, it's a different matter .
I use a 5 weight from the tube for trout and land strong fish but for even small pike on the lake I fish a 9 weight is bent double to keep them up out of the weed.

For your salmon & sea trout you should use the 8 weight
 
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BobP

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There seems to be a general assumption here that it is the rod, and nothing but the rod, that does it all. People are forgetting that there is someone hanging on to the blunt end and that someone has a major input to the outcome of a fight with a fish.

I have frequently watched people with standard trout gear, ie 7 weights, play modest fish to a standstill because they are afraid to apply pressure and get the fish in the net quickly. Rod weight has little to do with it, experience does.

Incidentally, bobc, my personal best pike was caught accidentally when fishing from a boat on Chew. A size 10 buzzer fairly hooked inside the mouth and once I realised that it was a pike and not the mother of all brown trout, I had that fish in the boat inside 5 minutes. It was around 18lbs in weight. The rod? It was a 10' #5 which is my go-to stick for reservoir fishing.
 

luke troutstalker

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There seems to be a general assumption here that it is the rod, and nothing but the rod, that does it all
I'm not sure that's the case, people seem to be suggesting the rod is only a part of the process, which is how I see it, and yourself too, from what I gather.

I don't do much ressy fishing, but when I do for buzzers etc I fish light. I have been using a 9'9#4, but I might jump up to a 9'6 #5, as last time out I felt a bit more weight would have helped in the wind.
Fishing wise though, there's nothing really to say, you are not trying to steer them out of snags, and as long as your tippet is up to it, you can crank them in.

You still can't get away from the laws of physics though - take the common cents system. A static rod rating system that measures how much weight is needed to deflect the tip of a fly rod 1/3rd of the rods length. The fact is, the heavier the line rating, the more weight is required to do this. So by that rational, if you took the weight required to deflect a 5 weight by 1/3, and then hung that on an 8 weight, the 8 weight will be holding it higher in the air- the 8 weight has more resistance to the force applied.

When you take that, and apply it to troutfishing, it doesn't really apply. 3 weight, 8 weight, they'll all cope with your average stockie , all that happens is the lower the line rating of the rod, the closer to the cork you will be when pulling into a fish. So the question, when put in the context of trout fishing is moot, they will all do it.
 
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BobP

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I don't think you can stop a good sized fish from getting into snags, particularly at close range, irrespective of rod weight. If they bolt for cover they do so at speed, even a silly old chub will get faster then you or I can react. They have had thousands of years to perfect the art - we've had a generation or two.

Please come up to Farmoor - please do. I'd love to see you "crank" one of those in on any weight of rod. Most likely outcome - trout 1, luke 0.
 

young jon

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Luke, if the rod bends less, the fish has a greater lever to use against you. It's why boat fishing rods for cranking lumps out of wrecks are short. Point taken about steering the fish though.
 

luke troutstalker

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I don't think you can stop a good sized fish from getting into snags, particularly at close range, irrespective of rod weight. If they bolt for cover they do so at speed, even a silly old chub will get faster then you or I can react. They have had thousands of years to perfect the art - we've had a generation or two.

Please come up to Farmoor - please do. I'd love to see you "crank" one of those in on any weight of rod. Most likely outcome - trout 1, luke 0.
Bob, I'm agreeing with you, so I'm not sure of your angle on the 'farmoor challenge' :confused:

By your own admission you say it's the angler and not the rod that will bring a fish to the boat or bank.

You fish at farmoor with a 5 weight, and seem to have no trouble getting them in. So why would you challenge me to do the same, with say a 4 weight?
 

James9118

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Fly rods are inherently flimsy. They are designed to cast very small weights in terms of the lines mass (often less than 1/2 ounce). As such they will never have much stiffness if they are used in a 'high sticking' mode - i.e, rod tip high in the air, using the blanks test curve to apply pressure (although to the angler it feels like a lot of pressure because they're on the wrong end of a 9ft lever).

So what's more important than the AFFTA rating of the rod (which actually has no standard - the standard is one for line weight), is what the angler does with the rod they have.

James.
 

BobP

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luke,

By your own admission you are not a regular reservoir angler, so I assume that what stillwater fishing you do is on small lakes. You might be able to "crank" in fish from that sort of water to quote you, but you certainly won't from a big water.

I refer to Farmoor because by, not only my words, but from many others who have fished there some of whom post on here, the fish in F1 are large even by small stillwater standards. 4 & 5lb fish are not uncommon, and I had one pushing 6 last Sunday. You don't "crank" in fish like that, but I'd love to see you try.

I use a 10' #5 there and have tried a #4, but it gives me too many grey hairs to add to the multitude. I know from much experience that I can get F1 fish in fairly fast which is essential on a C & R water on the #5. The #4 takes longer.

young jon,

I assume you know that the sort of rods you refer to in the sea fishing context are mainly used to handle the heavy lines and pound plus lumps of lead they use. Plenty of fish such as conger, cod and pollack manage to crash dive into a wreck with the angler unable to do anything about it.

I used similar outfits a few years ago when sturgeon fishing on the Fraser River in BC. 150lb braid and a big chunk of lead should have been able to stop a truck. Not a 200lb sturgeon, though!
 

linkledger

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Why can you "crank" fish in on a small water, whatever that is, but not on a big water?.

Fished places the size of Rutland all the way down the scale and have never notice any difference in the fight. Some fish are feisty and some are puss cats.

Use a 9 ft 5# 99% of the time and never had any problems.
 

fredaevans

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Is it the case that a fly rod with a higher AFTM will have more power when playing a fish?

A number #5 for salmon? That could be interesting! :)
Well not a #5 single hander but I've hooked a considerable number of King Salmon (Rogue River in Oregon) on a 2hander. Our Summer Run Steelhead are like 'pea's in a pod' running between 4 and 6 pounds.

The interesting bit is the Fall Kings are moving in at the same time and will 'munch' the same 'dark fly.' Rod just sloooly bends over ... 'Here we go again!':eek: But with, even with a light line rated, 2hander it's amazing how large a fish you can handle.

The problem is you'll end up grinding the poor thing down to the point of exhaustion. NOT A GOOD THING! I hook one and its an immediate flat rod pointed at the fish and break him off. Sounds easy but its amazing how strong even 6# leader can be.

Years back had a second home (in an otherwise RV Park) and one of the residents was a full on Klamath Indian who Guided (Rich Henry). Did a demo where he took a run of 10# leader, had two of the biggest men on either end .. 'See if you can break it.':whistle:

They couldn't! :eek: Point made, most of us dropped down to 6 or 8 for leaders. How 'strong' is the leader has a lot to do with the rod (which is just a 'delivery system'), the more flexable the rod the more protected the leader it would appear.

fae
 

pikecatcher

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Thanks all. will use the 8 weight rod but still take the lovely 5 weight Orvis rod..................... and use it with wee Sea Trout flies. Of course, a salmon might take a size 14 TBS.................!!!
 

young jon

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young jon,

I assume you know that the sort of rods you refer to in the sea fishing context are mainly used to handle the heavy lines and pound plus lumps of lead they use. Plenty of fish such as conger, cod and pollack manage to crash dive into a wreck with the angler unable to do anything about it.

I used similar outfits a few years ago when sturgeon fishing on the Fraser River in BC. 150lb braid and a big chunk of lead should have been able to stop a truck. Not a 200lb sturgeon, though!
Yes Bob :D The point I was making is that rods are not designed to help you lift heavy weights.
 
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