Another quartet of salmon flies.

wingman

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A few more offerings to the Gods of the dark throne.:D Clockwise from top left; Dunkeld (Pryce-Tannatt), Silver Grey (Veniard), Silver Wilkinson (Veniard) and Childers (Fishing Gazette 1886). All tied at size 2/0.





Dressings still to add (after I've added the ones from the last lot:eek:mg:)



Thanks for looking.

cheers

mark
 
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iainmortimer

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As ever a beautiful set of flies. I love the detail of keeping the even sizing as much as the quality of tying at an individual level. True showcase stuff.
 

wingman

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tj hooker

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Superb Mark I could not pick a favourite love the shape of them the barred duck sides really stand out on the flys and great looking hooks .
 

wingman

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Superb Mark I could not pick a favourite love the shape of them the barred duck sides really stand out on the flys and great looking hooks .

Thanks Grahame recently got some Pintail for the first time, although from the US of course and think it looks so much better than Teal when married up with the Wood Duck and is usually a lot longer.

Lovely Mark. Thanks for posting.

Thanks Phil my pleasure.
 

baca157

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Another beautiful set Mark. These should got in a frame.

I notice that you didn’t mix the barred Woodduck into the wing like you did in the SBS. Which method is more true to the original style? Mixed in or tied over the wing?

Is that the blue Pipers silk on the Childers’s tag?

Cheers,
Sebastian
 

wingman

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Another beautiful set Mark. These should got in a frame.

I notice that you didn’t mix the barred Woodduck into the wing like you did in the SBS. Which method is more true to the original style? Mixed in or tied over the wing?

Is that the blue Pipers silk on the Childers’s tag?

Cheers,
Sebastian


Thanks Sebastian. I generally follow the dressing description so if it says Barred Wood Duck and Teal married up I usually tie them over the wing more or less as sides. But if the dressing just states them as part of the winging materials without being married up then I either mix them into the main wing (if I'm tying a mixed wing) or just tie in over the wing but not married up to each other. A lot of Pryce-Tannatt dressings have them married together and the trend might have spread from there although I'm not 100% on that by any means but I think it's a more modern innovation like paired tippets with the black bar lining up with the butt and humpy wings. Personally I like to marry them together and then brush them into the wing but not so much as they disappear into the wing but can still be quite visible but this is usually on a mixed wing or tips down type of wing. Yes that's the Piper's on the Childers, hasn't the same light reflective quality as the Danvilles but still not bad and ok for when you need a hard to get colour.
 

baca157

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Thanks Sebastian. I generally follow the dressing description so if it says Barred Wood Duck and Teal married up I usually tie them over the wing more or less as sides. But if the dressing just states them as part of the winging materials without being married up then I either mix them into the main wing (if I'm tying a mixed wing) or just tie in over the wing but not married up to each other. A lot of Pryce-Tannatt dressings have them married together and the trend might have spread from there although I'm not 100% on that by any means but I think it's a more modern innovation like paired tippets with the black bar lining up with the butt and humpy wings. Personally I like to marry them together and then brush them into the wing but not so much as they disappear into the wing but can still be quite visible but this is usually on a mixed wing or tips down type of wing. Yes that's the Piper's on the Childers, hasn't the same light reflective quality as the Danvilles but still not bad and ok for when you need a hard to get colour.

Thanks for explanation regarding Woodduck Mark. I still find quite a lot of the techniques very confusing and inconsistent.

I like that paler colour of Pipers silk. Think it looks more authentic than Danvilles to be honest. After all, it’s silk which was the body material they were using back in the day.

I use silk for bodies (if I can get hold of the colour) to make up for use of GSP thread in my wing work:whistle:

Cheers,
Sebastian
 

wingman

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As with most things Sebastian there's more than one way to skin a cat. Tying classic's is no exception and there a numerous techniques you could use to do the same thing and it's just a question of working out which way you find is best suited to you or you find works the best to give you the desired result. I've mentioned before that I don't tie these flies in 100% accordance with how they were tied back in the day and even then tiers of these flies had their own techniques and styles of tying them. Mostly I look at the dressing and roughly put the fly together in my head of how I'd like it to look but it doesn't always end up like that which is ok as I'm not trying to create an exact copy of a blueprint. I think it's important to find your own unique style and just stick with it if you're happy with that regardless of such and such not being the right shape or in the wrong size etc etc. I tend to stick loosely within classic salmon fly proportions but I also try to see what I can get away with. What I've come to find is that a fly will always look right if there's a nice balance between hackle, wing, body and tail and also to the hook itself. Any one of them out of kilter will be noticeable, more perhaps on a subliminal level. The thing about the silks is back then they didn't construct under bodies with white silk floss (another innovation) as far as I'm aware but maybe a taper was made using various other things. The white floss base makes the coloured floss appear much brighter than you see on vintage flies. I know Kelson mentions constructing a taper using the coloured floss, wrapping closer each turn to create a taper as you go with no mention of an under base.
 
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