Anyone know what this is? (Graphic)

deddog

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These are undoubtedly Diphyllobothrium (fish or broad tapeworm) cysts , adequately freezing or cooking fish will kill the parasite.
I would guess that many people have unknowingly encountered this and many other parasites in the food they eat so I wouldn't worry about eating the flesh.
 

Rhithrogena

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These are undoubtedly Diphyllobothrium (fish or broad tapeworm) cysts , adequately freezing or cooking fish will kill the parasite.
I would guess that many people have unknowingly encountered this and many other parasites in the food they eat so I wouldn't worry about eating the flesh.
I totally agree. I used to work in fish parasitology. They are definitely encysted tapeworm larvae. Hope the o.p. cooked it well, the adults are up to 30 feet long... https://www.researchgate.net/figure...the-stomach-of-an-Arctic-charr_fig2_280659742
Diphyllobothrium-larvae-encysted-and-free-see-arrow-on-the-stomach-of-an-Arctic-charr.png

EDIT: I see Fishtales had posted the same link. Touché
 
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roger h 10

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I don't know what it is but I have seen it many times inside rainbow trout. It doesn't seem to affect the flesh in any way.
Be careful of any greeny/yellow liquid it may be from the gall bladder and that will spoil the flesh if it gets on it. Bitter as gall is a very apt desciption.
 

Fish8MyFly

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Ran it past a very experienced marine biologist. Certainly cements what a few of you have already suggested is the promblem.

“Your description and the last lot of images look a lot more like tapeworm cysts (most likely Diphyllobothrium)
You can become infected through eating raw fish or not properly cooked fish. It’s not very common, it caused a few issues in smoked salmon, when I worked in Galway in the early 90s. Your fish would most likely have picked up the infection through feeding on infected crustaceans.”

For the record i binned the fish
 

Paul_B

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These are undoubtedly Diphyllobothrium (fish or broad tapeworm) cysts , adequately freezing or cooking fish will kill the parasite.
I would guess that many people have unknowingly encountered this and many other parasites in the food they eat so I wouldn't worry about eating the flesh.

Thank you, its something I've never seen before
 

roger h 10

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Actually it does look similar to the tape worm cysts that are common in pork flesh, this is the main reason that you should always cook pork thoroughly.
Some Europeans ,especially the Dutch, eat a lot of undercooked pork and tapeworms are very common there. Ughh! Horrible things!!
 

bonefishblues

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Actually it does look similar to the tape worm cysts that are common in pork flesh, this is the main reason that you should always cook pork thoroughly.
Some Europeans ,especially the Dutch, eat a lot of undercooked pork and tapeworms are very common there. Ughh! Horrible things!!
That's a bit hard on the dutch, who I always find a very amiable race :)
 

PaulD

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It's a well known fact so why is it being harsh?

I suggest you re-read your sentence . . .

'Some Europeans ,especially the Dutch, eat a lot of undercooked pork and tapeworms are very common there. Ughh! Horrible things!!'

. . . who does it suggest are 'horrible things'? Your sentence suggests the Dutch.
 

Rhithrogena

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Worst case, the disease these worms causes is easily treatable. The main problem is the prospect of pernicious anaemia caused by B12 deficiency. Anthelmintic drugs are safe and effective.
Symptoms are vague, with many infections asymptomatic, and include gastrointestinal pain, irritability, and fatigue. Diagnosis is through examination of stools looking for tapeworm segments and eggs passed in the faeces.
 

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