At last - an Orange Parson 😂

baca157

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Glasgow
Your best one yet Kevin. Nice neat head on it as well. You are certainly putting all critique into practice.

If I had to pick on anything then I would suggest the throat being a bit longer and you could have started the fly a bit further down the bend of the shank to give it a longer body but that’s just nit picking. Seriously, well done.

Cheers,
Sebastian
 

arkle

Well-known member
Points
48
MY observations are really much the same as Seb's, with perhaps a slightly larger kingfisher cheeks, + a smoother head, & the gut eye a mm or so shorter. Great stuff, all the same.
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
Yep, you're right lads. As soon as I looked at the picture I realised the throat was short.... In future I'll select hackles and throats at the same time to ensure proportions.
I've already begun my next fly!!!!
 
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wingman

Well-known member
I'll get him going round that bend if I have to go round the bend myself.:D What Sebastian and John said so I won't reiterate but the tag going further round the bend means you can have a longer body length and fly won't look crowded which means you can make the wing slightly longer to. Still nice work Kev and the main thing is you're getting used to working on much larger flies which isn't always easy after tying trout flies.
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
I wasn't happy with the shape of the tippet wing.... I found one tippet that had a lovely shape, but I looked through 4 GP heads and couldn't find a match......
 

wingman

Well-known member
I wasn't happy with the shape of the tippet wing.... I found one tippet that had a lovely shape, but I looked through 4 GP heads and couldn't find a match......
Nothing wrong with the shape of the tippet wing Kev and it looks set perfectly to me and flat together as it should be. Still very impressive at this early stage and it's easy for me to say but you forget just how difficult it is to tie these flies as the years go by.
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
My biggest problem was the crest, I lost count of the attempts it took to get it to lay anywhere near sensible. How on earth you can 6 on top of each other is beyond me Mark!!!
 

wingman

Well-known member
My biggest problem was the crest, I lost count of the attempts it took to get it to lay anywhere near sensible. How on earth you can 6 on top of each other is beyond me Mark!!!
I'm sure you'll find that one out some day Kev but yeagh toppings can be a real pain sometimes but the more GP heads you have to choose from the more options you'll have. I must have bought over 30 GP heads since I started on Classics you can never have enough.
 

doobrysnatcher

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
kitchen
im not a salmon fly tyer, but i read somewhere , a tail crest should reflect the bend of the hook similar to a heart shape ,or a mirror image of the hook bend , if you know what i mean , and to get the desired effect ,you need to select then strip the unwanted fibres from the stalk ,size it up and squeeze the sten with a pliers so its flat , to make it easier to tie in ,its the same technique for roofing or veiling a fly ,that way it tends not to flare out,
this hopefully will help you ,
on that i think your fly is a beuty
 

arkle

Well-known member
Points
48
As DBS says, "squeeze the sten with a pliers so its flat" , but the stem/rachis actually needs a slight kink in it, if you have a decent thumbnail, it still needs a degree of practice & a few failures along the way. My nails are very soft & you only have to look at them & to break, which is annoying to say the least. Flat nosed pliers, maybe alright, however I'll be replacing my cheaper version of this style with these shortly. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PARALLEL-ACTION-ROUND-FLAT-NOSE-NYLON-JAW-PLIERS-JEWELRY-CRAFTS-WITH-EXTRA-JAW/261882402466
 

arkle

Well-known member
Points
48
As DBS says, "squeeze the sten with a pliers so its flat" , but the stem/rachis actually needs a slight kink in it, if you have a decent thumbnail, it still needs a degree of practice & a few failures along the way. My nails are very soft & you only have to look at them & to break, which is annoying to say the least. Flat nosed pliers, maybe alright, however I'll be replacing my cheaper version of this style with these shortly. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PARALLEL-ACTION-ROUND-FLAT-NOSE-NYLON-JAW-PLIERS-JEWELRY-CRAFTS-WITH-EXTRA-JAW/261882402466
 

m r roid

Well-known member
Points
43
As DBS says, "squeeze the sten with a pliers so its flat" , but the stem/rachis actually needs a slight kink in it, if you have a decent thumbnail, it still needs a degree of practice & a few failures along the way. My nails are very soft & you only have to look at them & to break, which is annoying to say the least. Flat nosed pliers, maybe alright, however I'll be replacing my cheaper version of this style with these shortly. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PARALLEL-ACTION-ROUND-FLAT-NOSE-NYLON-JAW-PLIERS-JEWELRY-CRAFTS-WITH-EXTRA-JAW/261882402466
Yep, been doing that John, it can still be a bu88er though :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

wingman

Well-known member
im not a salmon fly tyer, but i read somewhere , a tail crest should reflect the bend of the hook similar to a heart shape ,or a mirror image of the hook bend , if you know what i mean , and to get the desired effect ,you need to select then strip the unwanted fibres from the stalk ,size it up and squeeze the sten with a pliers so its flat , to make it easier to tie in ,its the same technique for roofing or veiling a fly ,that way it tends not to flare out,
this hopefully will help you ,
on that i think your fly is a beuty
Yes that is quite true doobrysnatcher and Dave Carne one of the top classic fly tiers in the world uses that mirror technique quite a lot by taking crests from very near the top of the head which are good for flies size 4/0 and less as they decrease in size as they go up. Usually they have just the right curve and if you nick along the topside of the stem with your thumb or finger nail you can put some nice cascade into the fibres. If you over do it you can reverse it by nicking along the underside of the stem which will reverse it again so you can keep trying until you achieve the effect you're after.. Saying that you don't want to pick a topping with to much curve as it'll look to severe but as you mention one that matches the bend of the hook as close as possible. They need to be tied in on the creamy white base part of the stem as this is flatter so you want to use as much if not all of the whole crest. Rather than strip a few of the lower fibres off I cut them as close to the stem as I can which helps stabilise it when tied in. I also put a nick in the stem just after the tie in point which gives me a bit of leeway and I can increase the tail height after it's tied in if needed. Usually a lot of the smaller crests are twisted and sometimes if you're lucky you can get a head with a lot of straight ones on it. The ones that are only slightly twisted can be straightened with a bit of stem manipulation with finger and thumb nail.

Here's a Fiery Brown that I tied some time ago that shows the effect of the curve of the tail mirroring the hook bend and notice I've put some cascade into the fibres to enhance it's look.



The tail is actually one of the most important parts of the fly as it sets the tone for how the final fly will look particularly with respect to the wing height and length so you want to take as much time as you can in selecting and preparing the tail with close attention to height, shape and length. If you want to have a low wing you want to pick a tail with very little curve to it and set it low maybe to around a third of hook gape depth in height. If you want a high wing pick a crest with more curve and set it at a height equivalent to the hook gape depth but no more than that. Basically you're trying to match the proportions of the fly to the hook style and there are many different hook styles so you have to try and work out which proportions work best for a particular hook then stick with that for all your flies on that particular hook although that's me just generalising and it's not set in stone as you can get away with things depending on the style of fly you're tying.
 
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