Badgers 0 Cars 8

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
113
Timothy Charles Robert Noel Bentinck, 12th Earl of Portland(David Archer) is the descendant of the 4th Duke of Portland, got his crest on ma hoose.

Two supporting badgers,rampant, double queued ?
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Points
113
Two supporting badgers,rampant, double queued ?
Ha, that would be more suited, its just a crown, I think the stone mason was taking the piss to be honest...The Bentnick Cavendish's have no family money now, think the other branch married better.

image-5-x380.jpg
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
113
That's quite a coincidence though, your housebuilder's progeny coming up in a thread,

This is Bentincks coat of arms - "Fear dishonour"

 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Points
113
That's quite a coincidence though, your housebuilder's progeny coming up in a thread,

This is Bentinks coat of arms - "Fear dishonour"

I think more bizarre that the last of the line is David Archer!

The Bentnick's were a marriage addition to the Cavendish empire, one now sidelined, I think the crown is the Cavendish bit.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
113
I'm actually an Earl in Buckinghamshire🕺

After Stevenson made Stevenson's Rocket(the first steam locomotive for those that read the Mail) he was commissioned to make 'The Duke', it pulled coal past my house, track is still there.
Always thought you were a count! :p

Same for the Penydarren rail tracks, the genuinely first railway, still partially around along the Taff.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Points
113
Always thought you were a count! :p

Same for the Penydarren rail tracks, the genuinely first railway, still partially around along the Taff.
I love Victorian industry, all the more interesting when its just the derelict bits left for you to work out the story, like Wales the rapid development here was coal, the Bentnick Cavendish's owned the land the coal fields were in, the railway was initially just a means of getting the coal out on an industrial scale, but what was then built around that infrastructure is where it gets interesting, where I live is part of an estate that was built to show the ascension to wealth, from coal, just a few years into digging it out, the rise to wealth was clearly rapid, and the whole story of what they did with the wealth is written in architecture, interestingly with rail came a change in use for horses(I live in the former stables) and that is another historically fascinating tale.
What will be my new kitchen was the horse 'infirmary', and the house next to me was the racing stables, the Duke won the Darby the year that was built.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
113
I love Victorian industry, all the more interesting when its just the derelict bits left for you to work out the story, like Wales the rapid development here was coal, the Bentnick Cavendish's owned the land the coal fields were in, the railway was initially just a means of getting the coal out on an industrial scale, but what was then built around that infrastructure is where it gets interesting, where I live is part of an estate that was built to show the ascension to wealth, from coal, just a few years into digging it out, the rise to wealth was clearly rapid, and the whole story of what they did with the wealth is written in architecture, interestingly with rail came a change in use for horses(I live in the former stables) and that is another historically fascinating tale.
What will be my new kitchen was the horse 'infirmary', and the house next to me was the racing stables, the Duke won the Darby the year that was built.


This used to be one of the original thatched roof cottages of the village, one of my sheds now, it had a salmon smoker built onto the one end. The last owner pulled the facing wall down, fitted a metal roof and removed the smoker but when you stand inside you still get a sense of the lives people would have lived in a pre-industrial Wales. The main wattle and daub chimney flue still remains, how that lasted is beyond me, it looks highly inflammable.
 
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ohanzee

Well-known member
Points
113
That has to be restored, are the stairs to the left from the same period?

Got to nip out, catch up later.



This used to be one of the original thatched roof cottages of the village, one of my sheds now, it had a salmon smoker built onto the one end. The last owner pulled the facing wall down, fitted a metal roof and removed the smoker but when you stand inside you still get a sense of the lives people would have lived in a pre-industrial Wales. The main wattle and daub chimney flue still remains, how that lasted is beyond me, it looks highly inflammable.
Looks
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Points
113
Ok, I have a plan, it would make a great workshop, but the first project would have to be learning a bit of thatching, get the roof back on and thatched, how cool would that be.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
113
That would be cool alright, roof, no problem but thatching.... These cottages are known as Tŷ Unnos, which translates to "one night cottage", built on marginal land overnight and improved thereon once the squatters rights allowed to them under Welsh law were established. Locally the roof would be thatched by wheat, quite a bit on the net about them

The steps are a modern addition leading to an upper garden, the route was made by demolishing the salmon smoker to accommodate a conservatory built by the previous owner.
Here's Ms. Bach outside a virtual carbon copy



and how it could look if restored -

 
Not all of the 50,000+ found dead on the roads have been hit by cars, many have been hit by lead.


Andy
Andy, even the figure of 50,000+ dead on roads is conjecture. Who has counted them all?
To even suggest that they are there because they have been shot prior, is absolute tosh at least, and grossly mischevious at worse!
Farmer dumps dead badger on roadside for fear of tuberculosis?
Dont think so.
regards
Bert
 

bobmiddlepoint

Well-known member
Points
83
Location
STAYING AT HOME!
Andy, even the figure of 50,000+ dead on roads is conjecture. Who has counted them all?
To even suggest that they are there because they have been shot prior, is absolute tosh at least, and grossly mischevious at worse!
Farmer dumps dead badger on roadside for fear of tuberculosis?
Dont think so.
regards
Bert

It is not mischievious, it is what happens. I don't know how many are killed on the roads and while I admit most you see dead beside the road are road kill a number are not.
If you are a dairy or cattle farmer and you have shot a badger (which they do) on a farm in an area criss crossed with footpaths and budding Chris Packhams what are you to do with the body. If you know farmers they aren't going to make work for themselves digging a hole. The easiest thing to do is dump it on a busy road in a location where badger road kills occur. A few Scammells over it will soon hide the real cause of death to the casual observer and who is going to stop at the side of a busy road with no layby to walk out into the traffic to investigate anyway.

I know a man who tries to run badgers over whenever he sees them at night. Admittedly this is on country roads in his works pickup, having hit two badgers myself by accident at 60mph in a family car I can tell you it isn't something you want to do!


Andy
 

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