Barometers - anyone use them?

A. Fluker

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I know we have had this thread before - many moons ago so just wanted to enquire if anyone used them in connection with their fishing or people just liked the hall decoration?

Often wondered if they were considered to be a useful tool.

Thanks for your views and any comments in advance.

:)
 

sussexflyguy

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I don't - have thought about it a number of times, and when I get round to writing my fishing diary (I'll start next week..) I should really record it.

But very interested to hear from anyone that does record atmospheric pressure - and whether they find it impacts fish behaviour at all?

N
 

black knight

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I have a look at my barometer and tap it to see if it's rising or falling.The effect of barometric pressure on fishing feeding activity is one of the more interesting theories. The theory proposes that a dropping air pressure brings on feeding activity, rising pressure turns the fish off feeding, high pressure results in the fish moving to shallower water, and low pressure results in fish moving to deeper water. I don't rely on this information I just add it to all the other weather information available before I go fishing.
 

MARAZION MIDGE

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Have had one for many years, although it has become less watched.
You can in some way determine fishing with them, you will fined that a dropping pressure means less fish, and fishing is best with a constant pressure reading, and more so with wild fish than farmed in my opinion.
Your asking lots of questions loop with your new user name, are you in crisis?
Go on pop into view point and post us a boob or 3.
Merry Christmas to you.
Mike
 

guest70

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Very useful in my book. I'm a bit anal when it comes to things like weather and atmospheric pressure. As in all things controlled my mother nature, clear cut patterns are often difficult to identify and the interference of so many other intangible variables makes a mockery of our humble attempts to second guess what's going to happen.

Generally though, fish don't respond well to a falling glass...and the more rapidly and suddenly it falls, the worse it puts them off. The reasons for this are probably more complex than just saying 'fish don't like falling air pressure'. Suppression of invertebrate activity is likely to be linked (apparently, insects are extremely sensitive to changes in air pressure) for example.

It's a mammoth topic and one which could be dissected for hours. Stan Headley's book 'the loch fisher's bible' offers a good discussion.

Matt
 

discodazz

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I use the one on my watch and do find that I catch more fish when the pressure is gently rising. Im not certain if this is due to confidence or wether the atmospheric pressure actually does affect the fish in some way. The book 'Trout, Salmon and the Evening Rise. The Barometric Breakthrough.' is worth a read.
 

devon flyfisher

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Sometimes i do, especially if there hasn't been rain for sometime, i am certain the sea trout 'feel' it and 'switch off' getting ready for a rise in water and another run up the river.
Just my own theory on it but its an observation made over 20 years of fishing on the River Teign.
Cheers
Richard
 

Guest103

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This I found interesting

Effects of Barometric Pressure on Fishing
By Lee Adams​
It has been known for a long time that the barometric pressure has an effect on fishing. How the pressure directly effects the fish is still not fully understood, but knowing how to use the barometric pressure readings can greatly increase your chances of catching fish, especially in shallow and fresh waters.
Barometric pressure is the measure of the weight of the atmosphere above us. It exerts pressure on the waters we fish and even on us. In fact, it can change how well some people feel. It is believed by many, that it may have a similar and even more dramatic effect on fish effecting their feeding habits.
Measurement of barometric pressure is accomplished with the use of a barometer. A barometer measures the weight of the atmosphere per square inch (pressure) and compares it to the weight of a column of mercury.
The first instrument was invented in 1643 by Evangelista Torricelli. His barometer used a glass tube from which all air has been removed (a vacuum) and is inserted into a container of mercury that is exposed to the pressure of the air. The air pressing down on the mercury in the container forces an amount of the mercury up into the glass tube. The height to which the mercury rises is directly proportional to the pressure of the atmosphere. This is usually measured in inches (inHg) or in millibars (1 inHg equals 33.864 millibars).
Today aneroid barometers, invented by the French scientist Lucien Vidie in 1843, are the most widely used instrument to detect air pressure. An aneroid is a flexible metal bellow that has been sealed after removing some of it's air (a partial vacuum). A higher atmospheric pressures will squeeze the metal bellow while a lower pressure will allow it to expand. This expansion of the metal is usually mechanically coupled to a dial needle which will point to a scale indicating the barometric pressure.
A new form of barometer uses a pressure transducer. This transducer is like a miniature aneroid barometer that converts the amount of air pressure into a proportional electrical voltage. This voltage then can be fed into a digital readout and/or into a computer.
Barometric pressure varies with altitude. A higher elevation will have less atmosphere above it which exerts less pressure. To keep readings standard across the world, barometric pressure is to be indicated at sea level. Therefore, readings at elevations other than at sea level will require a correction factor which is based on the elevation and the air temperature (colder air weighs more and will require a greater correction).
The barometric pressure changes as the weather systems over us changes. When you look at a weather map that has those blue "H"s and red "L"s, this is indicating the areas with High and Low pressure. It is worth noting that the areas with high pressure are the areas with good weather, and the areas with low pressure are the areas with bad weather. Barometric pressure has been used by weathermen since the beginning of meteorology to predict the weather. It can also be used by fishermen to predict the quality of fishing, and more importantly, how to fish.
As a general guideline, think of 30 inHg (1016 millibar) as being a normal level. World records vary from a high pressure of 32.0 inHg in Siberia to 25.7 inHg during a typhoon (both readings are off the scale of most barometers). For the US, extreme levels can be considered as 30.5 inHg and 28.5 inHg. When it comes to fishing, a change of just +/- 0.02 inHg from normal is enough to effect their feeding habits.

It is important, however, to note that the effects of barometric pressure is greater in fresh and shallow waters, than it is in deeper waters. This is probably due to the fact that the pressure of water is so much greater in deeper waters making the air pressure above it no longer having any significance.
Some general rules regarding barometric pressure are:

It is important to note that after a long feeding period, the action will slow regardless of the following conditions. On the flip side, a long period of poor fishing conditions may be followed by a really good one.
It is also important to note, that the barometric pressure is just one of many factors that effect fish feeding habits. Other effects include water temperature, light, tidal forces, water clarity, the pH level, water levels, wind/surface disturbance, boat traffic, fishing pressure, and so on. Another good judging factor of fishing is the solunar effects which play a role in the tidal and illumination factors
 

ohanzee

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there are times when a barometer is more useful than a rod, but if you don't know what the weather is doing when you plan a days fishing, knowing the air pressure is plummeting is not terribly inspiring.

there is no doubt all animals and fish respond to air pressure, birds and fish perhaps more than most, but knowing fish feed more on a rising barometer is only a small part, a barometer and an eye on wind direction and speed lets you work out whats going to happen next, if there is only going to be one hour of activity in a day its handy to when it could be.

bird activity gives a good indication, maybe better.
 

anglingbri

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Jan 29, 2011
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Hi There,
I purchased one 2 years ago now and pressures on my fishing outings to the river are recorded in my fishing diary, Mainly salmon/sea trout I admit but hope in a few years to make some usefull sense of pressure and oxygen content and salmons taking behaviour.
Read R V Righyni`s book on Salmon Taking Times to wet your appetite on the subject.
Tight Lines for 2012 everyone

Anglingbri:thumbs:
 

oakedge

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I've got a few and I love em. They are often more accurate than the BBC weather forecast. However, the worst thing you can do is to let a barometer influence whether you go fishing or not. As we all know trout don't respect what they are supposed to do or when, so, get the barometer by all means but go fishing anyway. ATB, Alan
 

aenoon

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I use the one on my watch and do find that I catch more fish when the pressure is gently rising
Is not coincidence.
Migratory salmonids do take more readilly on rising presure. Have learned that over 50 years of weather watching, prior to hitting the water!
I assume the same response is evident on lochs for trout as well.
regards
bert
 

Scratch

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The theory proposes that a dropping air pressure brings on feeding activity, rising pressure turns the fish off feeding.
I think you'll find the reverse to be the accepted wisdom, Alban.

I always have a peep at the air pressure when planning a trip, and I'm mighty pleased if it's rising or steady. Although a falling glass doesn't stop me. Not sure there's anything more to it though than a rising or steady glass being indicative of settled weather... which the fish, and inverts like.
 
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steveow

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Cornwall,Cotswolds,Adelaide
I know we have had this thread before - many moons ago so just wanted to enquire if anyone used them in connection with their fishing or people just liked the hall decoration?

Often wondered if they were considered to be a useful tool.

Thanks for your views and any comments in advance.

:)
Well I tried to use a barometer but I could never get the right line weight and the reel was a right pain to fit, bit heavy too:eek:mg:

Now being serious for a bit, I dont pay too much attention to the barometer, I feel trying to quantify/pontificate and reduuce my angling success or failier into a set of numbers is not for me a vialble or interesting way to decide if I will or will not go fishing, with todays tech of sat nav ,gps ,fish finders etc I still like to rely or good ol watercraft and a bit of luck to catch my fish.

Fishing for me is fishing and just being there at peace angling is what I will do regardless of the barometers advice, I have no doubt that the air pressue will have some effect on the fishing and the fishes food and mood and inclination to take my fly but there are so many other variables to take into account that the barometer reading is just one tine part of an equation that is in a constant chaotic state of flux. Not all fish are equal and some respond better to a rising pressure and some the reverse and for me I prefer steady conditions......Whatever I have caught fish when all information dictates I should blank and also I have blanked when I should have caught, so therein lies the the endless paradox of angling, just get out there have a fish and enjoy yourself....Happy X mas:wine:
 

Tommy Ruffe

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There's an old saying, "As the barometer rises, so do the fish."

I bought a barometer some years ago, as an aid to my fishing and to test the theory. I took regular readings up to going out fishing, and found that the air pressure, rising or falling, had little bearing on whether or not the fish fed.

There are too many variables. Wind has the greatest effect on still-waters, along with temperature. I do believe trout prefer settled conditions and any change in weather patterns usually puts them off feeding for a day or two.
 

ohanzee

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your all missing the most useful bit, a barometric reading when you catch only tells you what you already know, if you combine air pressure with the last 3 days ap and wind direction you are in a position to monitor the weather and predict over a couple of days,
not much use if you only fish on thursdays but very useful if you fish over 2 or 3 days, also lets you know when your going to get soaked.
 

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