Bats - seems early for them?

jack_russell

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Well - whilst putting the chickens to bed at the allotments this eve a couple of bats were flitting around on dusk - seems early for them? 🦇

Don't recall ever seeing bats this early in the year before & was wondering if anyone else has?

I know it can be milder in Cornwall but it's not exactly bikini weather & Feb does sound early!
 

Rhithrogena

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Yep my local bats were active round the mine chimney at the back this evening too! Saw one twice, or was it two once? Pipistrelles. A few rises on the pond there as well, so stuff is hatching. Might have a cast tomorrow...
Sorely tempted to nip over to Siblyback tomorrow, but not sure if the 12 mile drive for excercise is taking the p*ss...
 

3lbgrayling

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15-17 deg.Of course they think it's time to come out of hibernation.We should be worried how many will die when it get colder again. same for hedgehogs.

Jim
 

jack_russell

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Yep my local bats were active round the mine chimney at the back this evening too! Saw one twice, or was it two once? Pipistrelles. A few rises on the pond there as well, so stuff is hatching. Might have a cast tomorrow...
Sorely tempted to nip over to Siblyback tomorrow, but not sure if the 12 mile drive for excercise is taking the p*ss...

If you do make to sibly it's fishing quite well - a couple of my mates had a great days dangling today🎣
 

Paul_B

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As my chickens are still fastened up due to avian lockdown I don't go into the garden after dusk, however I've noticed quite a few midges out during the day, so if its warm enough for them its warm enough for bats.
 

bonefishblues

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15-17 deg.Of course they think it's time to come out of hibernation.We should be worried how many will die when it get colder again. same for hedgehogs.

Jim
Is that a thing? Serious Q - I sort of had nature down as being more adaptable than that, and that it could go back to sleep if necessary - hibernation being a more flexible state than perhaps we had previously thought.
 

PaulD

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I've just come off the phone from chatting to my Aunt who lives in St Just, not a million miles from Cape Cornwall who tells me it's a beautiful day down there. The sun's shining, she's walked down the road to post a letter, has all her windows open and has been outside to clean her window sills, 'Cos they was 'eavin!'. She's just going to make some shortbread. She's 90 years old.

Plenty warm enough for bats and in the Southwest they often start to make an appearance from March onwards. Further North it's often May before they're out in force.
 

3lbgrayling

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Is that a thing? Serious Q - I sort of had nature down as being more adaptable than that, and that it could go back to sleep if necessary - hibernation being a more flexible state than perhaps we had previously thought.
I do believe that they can go back into a sort of Hibernation.But I also Believe that quite a few starve as they hunt for non existant food.
It also applies to trout/salmon if we have a mild winter.the eggs hatch early.and once the eggsac is used up .they starve as there is not enough food for them

Jim
 

jack_russell

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On the allotment/chicken run just now the bats were out again - 3 this evening so they've brought a mate with them now!

6 frogs in the pond too - adding to the jelly that's already in there!
 

wjg

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Hopefully it is just an abnormally warm session for the colonies jack. In North America we are experiencing a problem with White Nose Syndrome, a transmissible fungus that infects colonies and causes bats to wake and fly when it is too cold for insects. On PEI, Little Brown Bats are the most prevalent and hardest hit. Those that had bat houses for mosquito control in the yard are now adding more to increase "social distancing"
 
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