Battery advice

noeyedeer

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On that evidence Col, I probably did well on the Platinum Leisure then. Didn't keep a log but probably got about 4 seasons with a couple or more trips per season, followed by a long spell of leaving on maint charge, then (mistakenly) neglecting to keep on charge for a long spell.

Now got 2 trickle chargers plus a regular one, so if I go for a new battery I've more chance of not leaving it unattended.....
 

Paul_B

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I found the make has a lot to do with it. I was buying cheap 110 AH/115 AH batteries, from brands such as "UK Giant" and "Platinum" and getting barely 2 seasons out of them. Then I switched to Halfords (I think Bosch are the same ones), and suddenly I was getting 5 or even 6 seasons out of them! I also use the smaller 70 AH ones, for an 'electric ghillie' when using both petrol and leccy together, and even the Halfords ones barely make it through 3 years, I think because they are the type C and are only rated for 80 cycles - particularly if you drain them hard - which you are warned not to do!

My mate has an old Halfords 115 AH, that is now approaching 10 years of age, and is still going strong, thanks to very limited usage. I borrow it off him to give me a 3rd battery when going up to Loch Hope, and it still gets us through a day if we don't tan it. In return, I put it through a 'recondition' cycle on my CTEK charger, while I have it.

You can tell the difference between a cheap one and a Halfords. Just pick them up. A cheap one will weigh about half of a Halfords. My mate's 10 year old one is even heavier than a modern Halfords - it weighs a ton!

Col
Nowadays Halfords own are more than likely Yuasa, their EFB's are very good (y)
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Nowadays Halfords own are more than likely Yuasa, their EFB's are very good (y)

Aye, I don't know who makes them for Halfords, but I know I can trust them more than cheap brands. A few years ago, I had a Halfords and John (Colliedog) had a Bosch and they were identical apart from the colour of the casing, so I figured Bosch were supplying them at the time.

Col
 

noeyedeer

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So all this got me thinking........if a battery can be rendered useless by simply leaving it standing unused for a time, surely when purchasing a new one, you'd want to know it was fresh from the production line and not standing for months in the shop?
 

3lbgrayling

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So all this got me thinking........if a battery can be rendered useless by simply leaving it standing unused for a time, surely when purchasing a new one, you'd want to know it was fresh from the production line and not standing for months in the shop?
I have seen many batteries with a circular disc sticker with year/month punched.,

Jim
 

Paul_B

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So all this got me thinking........if a battery can be rendered useless by simply leaving it standing unused for a time, surely when purchasing a new one, you'd want to know it was fresh from the production line and not standing for months in the shop?

The shop should charge them regularly but always ask, as said they are date stamped.

I wanted a leisure battery for the caravan while in Norfolk some years ago and asked the shop if they could fully charge it for me as we were stopping on a non electric site and only had solar to charge with.
They said they had no means of charging batteries, so walked out and I went to Wilco's, they said they are all charged and would even charge my old battery and test it just-in-case. I bought theirs and it lasted several years, I do however have a Aldi battery charger for winter use.

Nowadays the caravan roof mounted solar panels do the job most of the time.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Some of the Lomond boys have a charger hooked up to their petrol motor so they can charge up the battery for the leccy as they go up the water.
 
D

Deleted member 81051

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I found the make has a lot to do with it. I was buying cheap 110 AH/115 AH batteries, from brands such as "UK Giant" and "Platinum" and getting barely 2 seasons out of them. Then I switched to Halfords (I think Bosch are the same ones), and suddenly I was getting 5 or even 6 seasons out of them! I also use the smaller 70 AH ones, for an 'electric ghillie' when using both petrol and leccy together, and even the Halfords ones barely make it through 3 years, I think because they are the type C and are only rated for 80 cycles - particularly if you drain them hard - which you are warned not to do!

My mate has an old Halfords 115 AH, that is now approaching 10 years of age, and is still going strong, thanks to very limited usage. I borrow it off him to give me a 3rd battery when going up to Loch Hope, and it still gets us through a day if we don't tan it. In return, I put it through a 'recondition' cycle on my CTEK charger, while I have it.

You can tell the difference between a cheap one and a Halfords. Just pick them up. A cheap one will weigh about half of a Halfords. My mate's 10 year old one is even heavier than a modern Halfords - it weighs a ton!

Col
Thumbs up for Halfords from me. I've used their 115Ah for years with no trouble.
 
D

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Some of the Lomond boys have a charger hooked up to their petrol motor so they can charge up the battery for the leccy as they go up the water.
I have that charging arrangement from my outboard, connected through a junction box, with a switched bilge pump outlet, cable for the electric outboard and cable to the battery. The 115Ah battery is under my bow seat to give additional weight up front.

My outboard engine has a 6A DC output capability, regulated to 12 volts by the battery. The DC rectified voltage output from an outboard engine varies between 4 and 40 volts, nominally, dependent on engine revs. As long as the rectifier is installed in the engine electrics, you don't need a separate voltage regulator, provided you have the output connected to a battery of greater capacity than the charger output capacity, i.e. in this case a battery of 7.5Ah or greater.
 
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