Beacon beige 14

doobrysnatcher

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
3,580
Location
ireland
IMG_20210221_210629.jpg
IMG_20210221_210551.jpg
 

Rhithrogena

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
1,016
Great stuff! My favourite traditional dry - first came across it on the Barle at Simonsbath in the 80's - bought from Mrs. Tout in Dulverton, who tied them herself. Her husband was the original tier of this fly, I believe, and tied it for the inventor.
Edit: I think the Beige version I bought back in the 80's from Mrs. Tout was the original that Peter Deane based the Beacon Beige on.
 
Last edited:

bobmiddlepoint

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 28, 2017
Messages
2,975
Location
Where I want to be
Great stuff! My favourite traditional dry - first came across it on the Barle at Simonsbath in the 80's - bought from Mrs. Tout in Dulverton, who tied them herself. Her husband was the original tier of this fly, I believe, and tied it for the inventor.

I think (and I hope I'm not connecting half memories here and making this up) that the fly was named after Culmstock Beacon - the hill over looking Culmstock and the river Culm in the Blackdown Hills.


Andy
 

Rhithrogena

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
1,016
I think (and I hope I'm not connecting half memories here and making this up) that the fly was named after Culmstock Beacon - the hill over looking Culmstock and the river Culm in the Blackdown Hills.


Andy
Yes, that is the oft stated origination for the Peter Deane variant of the original Barle pattern. This was tied locally for the soldier on leave from the first world war, who is credited with the pattern. What the difference in tying is I forget, sadly. I adopted the Beacon Beige when tying replacements of the flies I bought in Dulverton. Mrs. Tout was an old lady in the 80's and her deceased husband was the original tier, I was lead to believe by an old regular rod I met at the Exmoor Forest Hotel bar!
 

iainmortimer

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2014
Messages
3,315
Location
West Sussex
Beautiful flies. Its been 2 or 3 years since I tied any and that was for the FF&FT fly tying competition. Still in my box and so really must give them a swim!
 

doobrysnatcher

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
3,580
Location
ireland
Here you go, the full story of the Beacon Beige and an image of one tied by Peter Deane, taken from T. Donald Overfield's, '50 Favourite Dry Flies', 1980.

View attachment 36544


View attachment 36545
thanks for sharing that ,i always like the stories of origin of flies ,after reading it ,mine is not a beacon beige but a variant its tied with a polish quill ,grizzley and brown cock ,thanks for the dressing
 

Wee Jimmy

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
9,065
Location
Fife
It was also one of my favourite patterns on my local river during the LDO or LBD hatch.The one I used was also a variation of the original which used grizzle and medium blue dun.I still have them in my box,must be 30 odd years old now...😳
 

Rhithrogena

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
1,016
Here you go, the full story of the Beacon Beige and an image of one tied by Peter Deane, taken from T. Donald Overfield's, '50 Favourite Dry Flies', 1980.

View attachment 36544


View attachment 36545
Thanks Paul - another Tout pattern I still have a couple of somewhere was red game whisks and hackle, with white sheep wool body. I call it Tout's Fancy, but my memory could be tricking me....
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
2,224
Location
South Northants
I think that most of the flies we tie are, to a smaller or greater degree, a 'variation' of the original pattern. Personally, I wouldn't tie, or fish with, a fly with hackle as long as that used in the fly tied by Peter Deane himself - I hate it! What used to be caller Plymouth Rock, is now known as Grizzle. When I tie them I like the tail to be well marked grizzle and the grizzle to show well in the main hackle, I also use a natural Polish stripped quill. When I fish the fly I also trim the head hackle flat between the eye and the point - sits in the water well.

Beacon Beige.jpg
 

Rhithrogena

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
1,016
I think that most of the flies we tie are, to a smaller or greater degree, a 'variation' of the original pattern. Personally, I wouldn't tie, or fish with, a fly with hackle as long as that used in the fly tied by Peter Deane himself - I hate it! What used to be caller Plymouth Rock, is now known as Grizzle. When I tie them I like the tail to be well marked grizzle and the grizzle to show well in the main hackle, I also use a natural Polish stripped quill. When I fish the fly I also trim the head hackle flat between the eye and the point - sits in the water well.

View attachment 36547
That Deane BB certainly has long hackles, The Tout's Beiges I bought from Mrs. Tout herself at the Post Office in Dulverton were more traditionally proportioned...
Edit: I experimented with some with longer hackles and a hare's fur thorax, tied Funnel Dun style. They floated really well with the hook held out of the water. Might have to tie a few more for this season...
 

doobrysnatcher

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
3,580
Location
ireland
I think that most of the flies we tie are, to a smaller or greater degree, a 'variation' of the original pattern. Personally, I wouldn't tie, or fish with, a fly with hackle as long as that used in the fly tied by Peter Deane himself - I hate it! What used to be caller Plymouth Rock, is now known as Grizzle. When I tie them I like the tail to be well marked grizzle and the grizzle to show well in the main hackle, I also use a natural Polish stripped quill. When I fish the fly I also trim the head hackle flat between the eye and the point - sits in the water well.

View attachment 36547
nice tying
 

doobrysnatcher

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
3,580
Location
ireland
seems like most here used to tie or use it in goneby years. if it worked then it should work now ,
so who decides its out of fashion and what is it replaced with ?
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
2,224
Location
South Northants
seems like most here used to tie or use it in goneby years. if it worked then it should work now ,
so who decides its out of fashion and what is it replaced with ?

It will / does work now - Tommy Trout has never read a trout fly pattern book, to him, if it looks like food, behaves like food and is where he expects to find food . . . he'll eat it.

I have a 'healthy' collection of books, many older ones and I'm a fan of many of the flies that originated from the Welsh / English Border streams, the flies of Cosmo Barrett and Rev' Edward Powell, flies that I use today. Powell's Orange Otter a terrific dry fly, particularly for Grayling was tied with the biscuit coloured fur from an otter's throat dyed in picric acid and red ink - I use a blend of Z-lon and I'm pretty sure that if The Rev' Powell had access to Z-lon he'd have used it too. Many older patterns have huge numbers of turns of long hackles, mostly because the quality of hackles available was poor - what could be obtained from the local butcher - and many turns was required to keep flies afloat - they had poor floatants, Tiemco Dry Magic wasn't even a dream! I wonder if Peter Deanes Beacon Beige would have had such a long hackle if he had access to a Whiting Gold grizzle cape?

Of the many 1000s of flies I have, I doubt if any are not 'variants' to some degree, it doesn't matter.
 
Top