Bead-headed nymphs banging against rods

revo

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When casting bead-headed nymphs they sometimes bang against the rod. A carbon blank will only take so many dings and pings; each one weakens it until eventually it snaps.

(Before you ask about my technique: yes, some of these are my fault, but others are caused by the wind of a mid-cast change of direction to cover a rising fish.)

One of the reasons I've started using a split cane rod is that I think these are more impervious to the curse of the bead.

Any other tips or tricks? I wondered if beads could be coated in rubber (some PVA glue maybe?) or if I just just use differently weighed nymphs, with e.g. lead wire under the body?

Thoughts, comments, suggestions welcome!
 

ohanzee

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Had a conversation with David Norwich about this a few years ago, he warned against using bead heads with a couple of super light rods, the Orvis helios is apparently made with just 2 wraps and...he found a ding on mine:(
 

pati

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The only beadhead encounter with my fly rod that I ever noticed was a size 16 GRHE with a 2.4mm brass bead, casting very long (almost the full line) in the Connemara wind... Two or three other extra long casts later the tip of my Hardy Angel 2 Smuggler broke off... Not good to hear the ding when the rod is already under a lot of stress from hard casting (long distance plus wind meant double traction, tight loop and maximum line speed...).
 

JCP

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I never try to cast a heavier bead head too far and modify the technique to more of a constant tension cast considerably widening the arc and no induced line speed.They are by nature unpredictable so smooth as possible is the key if casting them on a normal outfit.Decent tippet diameter is also an important factor in any control of ''pluck,stop,tap casting bead heads with any real weight in them on a normal outfit. Leader to hand nymphing with these heads is much easier and a more suitable method for using them.I take it we are talking heavier bead heads as opposed to normal goldhead type patterns.

JP
 

revo

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I never try to cast a heavier bead head too far and modify the technique to more of a constant tension cast considerably widening the arc and no induced line speed.They are by nature unpredictable so smooth as possible is the key if casting them on a normal outfit.Decent tippet diameter is also an important factor in any control of ''pluck,stop,tap casting bead heads with any real weight in them on a normal outfit. Leader to hand nymphing with these heads is much easier and a more suitable method for using them.I take it we are talking heavier bead heads as opposed to normal goldhead type patterns.

JP
Thanks. Is the the French / Czech style? I must say that confuses me, they don't seem to aerialise any fly line, why not just use a fixed spool reel and cast as if bait / spinner?
 

icejohn

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I have worked out a few golden rules for casting bead flies that I stick by.

Have a big wide casting loop. So if you were
(no rude jokes here please) standing behind me, and pictured a clock face the rod forward stroke would be somewhere between 12-11. The back stroke would be 10-9. You do get fly line twist but the blank won't take hits from any beads.


As someone else has said don't go for crazy long casts you loose contol of the loop.


And I don't suggest changing direction to try cover rising fish mid cast.
 

LukeNZ

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I have worked out a few golden rules for casting bead flies that I stick by.

Have a big wide casting loop. So if you were
(no rude jokes here please) standing behind me, and pictured a clock face the rod forward stroke would be somewhere between 12-11. The back stroke would be 10-9. You do get fly line twist but the blank won't take hits from any beads.


As someone else has said don't go for crazy long casts you loose contol of the loop.


And I don't suggest changing direction to try cover rising fish mid cast.
You could use single hand Skagit techniques and your flies will no ever go behind you, and you will also get superior distance when required, and eliminate false casting to boot.
 

JCP

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Thanks. Is the the French / Czech style? I must say that confuses me, they don't seem to aerialise any fly line, why not just use a fixed spool reel and cast as if bait / spinner?
Leader to hand technique is close range fly rod style with proven results for ulimate take detection.Spinning set up just defeats the object.It is not like using a Bombarda set up with flies as often deployed in Scandinavia for coastal sea trout and here for bass and other species.Don't be confused give it a try.

JP
 

revo

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Leader to hand technique is close range fly rod style with proven results for ulimate take detection.Spinning set up just defeats the object.It is not like using a Bombarda set up with flies as often deployed in Scandinavia for coastal sea trout and here for bass and other species.Don't be confused give it a try.

JP

Just looked at some video tutorials. So basically the very long, tapered leader acts kind of like a fly line but also kind of not. You need a super long and light rod (max #3 weight, min 10'). The you start as if roll casting off the water using its friction as traction to give resistance and load the rod on the backcast, then a flip forward and shoot off the tip. No false casts, no fly line. And no trees behind you! So in the middle of a very wide, shallow and clear river you get a short(ish) easy (10 meters?) with good presentation and dead drift with no drag and without the need to mend line.

I can see that that might work. Not sure it's the best tactic for most English rivers, maybe more so in Wales and Scotland.
 

taffy1

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Well within my comfort zone
As already mentioned, a skagit style cast or even single & double Spey style casts, your lure/fly is always out in front of the rod & won't cause you or your rod any problems.
 

mrnotherone

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I can see that that might work. Not sure it's the best tactic for most English rivers, maybe more so in Wales and Scotland.
Euro nymphing, or contact nymphing or whatever you want call it is a very effecting way of catching wherever the river is. It may not appeal to everyone, but there is no doubting its effectiveness.
 
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JCP

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Just looked at some video tutorials. So basically the very long, tapered leader acts kind of like a fly line but also kind of not. You need a super long and light rod (max #3 weight, min 10'). The you start as if roll casting off the water using its friction as traction to give resistance and load the rod on the backcast, then a flip forward and shoot off the tip. No false casts, no fly line. And no trees behind you! So in the middle of a very wide, shallow and clear river you get a short(ish) easy (10 meters?) with good presentation and dead drift with no drag and without the need to mend line.

I can see that that might work. Not sure it's the best tactic for most English rivers, maybe more so in Wales and Scotland.
Plenty of trees here.

 

JCP

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There are a couple of chaps on YouTube on channels ''Trippin On Trout'' and ''Trout Hunting NZ'' who cast weighted nymph patterns much of the time.Worth watching how they cast the rigs.

JP
 

revo

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Plenty of trees here.

Thanks that was really good. I'd liked to have known more about his rod and tippet but I see how it works now: a "flip" cast. It seems that this style of fishing is really only for shortish range though? Also, without the weight of a fly line would it turn over a single dry?
 

Mrwayne

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if this was euro nymphing then the trick is to water load the rod and just forward cast with no back cast at all.
 

JCP

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Thanks that was really good. I'd liked to have known more about his rod and tippet but I see how it works now: a "flip" cast. It seems that this style of fishing is really only for shortish range though? Also, without the weight of a fly line would it turn over a single dry?
Don't think you watched the film properly.He did explain his set-up in detail.
 
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