Beavers - benefits for your rivers and streams

BobP

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I would be inclined to doubt the coypu identification. They were confined to the Norfolk Broads area after they escaped during the beginning of WW2 from a couple of nutria farms. In the aftermath of the war the Gov't mounted an eradication programme and I believe they managed to eliminate them well before the late 1960's.

I was very small when I came to England and we lived in Norfolk from 1947 until 1952. My father had quite a few coypu skins from animals he had shot as part of the eradication programme. He made a Davy Crockett hat out of one of them a few years later as part of a fancy dress dance in the village. He won top prize for the most original outfit.

More likely to have been puss in the curry.
 
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JohnH

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I would be inclined to doubt the coypu identification. They were confined to the Norfolk Broads area after they escaped during the beginning of WW2 from a couple of nutria farms. In the aftermath of the war the Gov't mounted an eradication programme and I believe they managed to eliminate them well before the late 1960's.
Bob, my understanding is that it was the devil's own job to completely get rid of the coypu from East Anglia, and they weren't officially confirmed as finally gone until the late 1980s... https://www.shootinguk.co.uk/features/what-happened-to-the-coypu-in-east-anglia-71358
 

JohnH

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But in a curry in Birmingham??
As I recall it Bob, there were some extremely dodgy stories doing the rounds about practices in Indian and Chinese restaurant kitchens in the late '60s and early '70s - as you hinted. Of course some, maybe most, were probably urban myths but it's said there is no smoke without fire. Open mind here...
 

original cormorant

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I saw one in the Findhorn valley in the late 60s.
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Sure it wasn't an early beaver?

I suspect that in the late 60's there would have been a lot of coypu carcases to dispose of and the fresh fish deliveries from Yarmouth and Lowestoft could easily have carried meat as well as fish.
 

BobP

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Sure it wasn't an early beaver?

I suspect that in the late 60's there would have been a lot of coypu carcases to dispose of and the fresh fish deliveries from Yarmouth and Lowestoft could easily have carried meat as well as fish.
Don't forget that by the late '60's there had already been a concerted effort since around 1948 to get rid of coypu from a fairly discrete area so I doubt there would have been a lot of coypu carcasses needing disposal. Also, were there THAT many curry houses in Birmingham in the late '60's?

Actually knowing the way government departments work there had probably been no verified sightings of coypu for at least 5 years, and probably ten years before they were "officially" declared extinct.
 

aenoon

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Don't forget that by the late '60's there had already been a concerted effort since around 1948 to get rid of coypu from a fairly discrete area so I doubt there would have been a lot of coypu carcasses needing disposal. Also, were there THAT many curry houses in Birmingham in the late '60's?

Actually knowing the way government departments work there had probably been no verified sightings of coypu for at least 5 years, and probably ten years before they were "officially" declared extinct.
Bit like them acknowledging beavers only existed on Tay around 2011!
regards
Bert
 

original cormorant

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Don't forget that by the late '60's there had already been a concerted effort since around 1948 to get rid of coypu from a fairly discrete area so I doubt there would have been a lot of coypu carcasses needing disposal. Also, were there THAT many curry houses in Birmingham in the late '60's?

Actually knowing the way government departments work there had probably been no verified sightings of coypu for at least 5 years, and probably ten years before they were "officially" declared extinct.
That was about when Balti was invented - perhaps coypu was the oriiginal balti! :whistle:

JohnH's posting gives a link to a history of coypu erradication.
 

blithfield2

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I would be inclined to doubt the coypu identification. They were confined to the Norfolk Broads area after they escaped during the beginning of WW2 from a couple of nutria farms. In the aftermath of the war the Gov't mounted an eradication programme and I believe they managed to eliminate them well before the late 1960's.
More likely to have been puss in the curry.
Blimey you take a bloke fishing and then he turns around and almost suggests you are.......... 'mistaken'!
 

BobP

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Blimey you take a bloke fishing and then he turns around and almost suggests you are.......... 'mistaken'!
Like I said upthread, I lived in Norfolk, albeit very young, but I know my father shot and trapped a lot of coypu up until we moved to Surrey in late 1951. I remember seeing a pile of coypu skins which he had taken with us to Surrey. The information we later got from friends of my father from the Surlingham area was that the coypu had been got rid of by the mid-'50's but perhaps that was just in that area.

How one ended up in a curry in Birmingham in the late 60's is a long stretch, you must admit, especially as at the time there were a lot of apochryphal tales of cats and even dogs being cooked and served to customers in Indian curry houses.
 

raphael

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Coypu is a nice meal... I did not taste myself (I'm a bit reluctant) but here many guys are making terrine. Just an aquatic herbivore rodent, may be consider it as a swimming rabbit instead of a big rat? ;):giggle:
But it looks too late to manage its eradication. It's a big trouble: leptospirosis vector, digging in dykes and leading to their collapse and then flooding, damaging the canals'banks, making holes in pastures that makes cattle breaking their legs, etc...

On the other hand, beavers are back and are usually welcome. Their presence is normal, even if mostly re-introduced decades ago in some spots from where they thrived again and then participated to biodiversity and ecosystems.
There are a few places where it is known that they made some dams across small watercourses but they can easily be removed (sometimes destroyed by floods) and are not real barriers.
The ones who do not like them are the poplar's planters but I do not like poplar's plantations, much damaging to wetlands and rivers ;)

R
 

williegunn

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Coypu is a nice meal... I did not taste myself (I'm a bit reluctant) but here many guys are making terrine. Just an aquatic herbivore rodent, may be consider it as a swimming rabbit instead of a big rat? ;):giggle:


R
Are we now taking dietary or at least advice regarding taste from a man who lives in a country that eats frog's legs and snails?
 
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