bio lines

doobrysnatcher

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there supposed to be the greener option,any one used them ?



Standard monofilament fishing line can have damaging effects on the environment for up to 600 years, or even longer!and flouracarbon upto a four thousand years

The advantage we as anglers have by using bioline biodegradable fishing line is this: When we lose our rigging, and are unable to retrieve the lost fishing line, we can be assured that the line we lost will no longer pose a threat to the environment in 2 to 5 years. , “...during years 2-5 it is significantly degraded permitting wildlife to easily break free should accidental entanglement occur.”and approx 5 years its gone FOREVER
 
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wobbly face

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Ordinary mono is suppose to degrade within a few years. Fluoro and copoly are the lasting culprits.
Problem with bio lines is their short life spam, fish being lost due to breakage as it degrades. It would help if there was some way of the line changing colour when expiring.
I use a monomaster and regularly collect line left buy others. :mad:
 

easker1

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A recent programme excavated a 1960's rubbish dump, and a newspaper of the day was perfectly readable so Monofilament nylon would be still around for a good few year, we just have to be careful, back to silkworm gut? I wonder how biodegradable that is? easker1
 

speytime

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I haven't tried it but it sounds like a great thing for the environment I'd certainly give a go, if it was reliable I'd continue to use it providing it was sensibly priced.

It's something that really annoys me lengths of nylon left lying around, I'd be worth a fortune if I could sell what I'd picked up over the years.

Al
 

doobrysnatcher

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Ordinary mono is suppose to degrade within a few years. Fluoro and copoly are the lasting culprits.
Problem with bio lines is their short life spam, fish being lost due to breakage as it degrades. It would help if there was some way of the line changing colour when expiring.
I use a monomaster and regularly collect line left buy others. :mad:
how do you dispose the monomaster contents when its full
How many times have you lost a monofilament tippet—or an entire leader—or inadvertently dropped a piece of waste monofilament line into the water? If you’re like the rest of us, the answer is “lots.” Even if you religiously store used line and dispose of it properly in the trash, it’s still going to wind up back in the ecosystem—either in a landfill or dumped at sea.

First introduced in 1939, millions of miles—perhaps tens of millions of miles—of nylon monofilament fishing line have been produced in the last 70 years, and every inch of it is still sitting out there somewhere in the ecosystem . . . and will be for at least the next 530 years. That’s right, whether buried underground or floating around in our rivers, lakes and oceans, nylon monofilament takes 600 years to biodegrade.
 
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ohanzee

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Watching christmas trees being wrappped and un rapped several times per tree ,i guess the amount of nylon(plastic) used in that trade beats almost any amount lost or dumped by anglers.
300,000 tonnes of card packaging is used at Christmas; enough to cover Big Ben, almost 260,000 times, and 1 billion cards end up in the bin, that's before you get to food or Xmas trees.

That's just this morning, who we trying to kid with talk of conservation?
 

taffy1

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Whatever, what's decided today or even 10+ years ago, the damage has already been done & this present attempt at reversing the damage is only a token gesture.
 

doobrysnatcher

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Whatever, what's decided today or even 10+ years ago, the damage has already been done & this present attempt at reversing the damage is only a token gesture.
yes there is some damage done already ,but to use one of tthese bio lines is surely a way forward ,to further reduce the impact they have on the enviroment and help prevent
any more damage been done, if not aleast minimize it
it has to be the way forward in fishing i believe
 

doobrysnatcher

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talking about coincidence plastic bag levy in uk proposed for a raise today its set to double to 10p
will this deter you from using them ?and dumping them ?
the enviroment is most likely to benifit from this
no more decorated trees maybe could this be only the start
 
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Secret Angler

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What do biodegradable lines degrade into? Microplastics of some form (all petroleum based)? That would be worse than lengths of line. Now I'm as assiduous as I can be in taking all line home, even little cutoffs from trimming the knot.

Gut would be degradable but I don't suppose we're going back to that.
 

doobrysnatcher

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What do biodegradable lines degrade into? Microplastics of some form (all petroleum based)? That would be worse than lengths of line. Now I'm as assiduous as I can be in taking all line home, even little cutoffs from trimming the knot.

Gut would be degradable but I don't suppose we're going back to that.
if there was a hefty levy imposed on these lines( that take 600plus years to degrade) and it was hitting the angler in his pocket im sure they( the anglers )wouldnt mind switching and purchasing to a cheaper or equally priced bio line which is less damaging to the enviroment in the long run
 

ohanzee

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if there was a hefty levy imposed on these lines( that take 600plus years to degrade) and it was hitting the angler in his pocket im sure they( the anglers )wouldnt mind switching and purchasing to a cheaper or equally priced bio line which is less damaging to the enviroment in the long run
That would be a good environmental policy but we generally do the opposite, electric cars are expensive for example, and we import any amounts of short lifespan plastic junk because its the holy grail of the British shopper..its cheap.
 

speytime

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I don't think it's fair to blame the shoppers, it's the trading companies that are demanding much cheapness so profits are kept high as possible.

Al
 

ohanzee

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I don't think it's fair to blame the shoppers, it's the trading companies that are demanding much cheapness so profits are kept high as possible.

Al
With the internet we can now compare prices and find the cheapest, which drives traders to be more competitive, I'd say we are the unwitting driver of the direction of travel.
 

doobrysnatcher

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With the internet we can now compare prices and find the cheapest,
which drives traders to be more competitive,
I'd say we are the unwitting driver of the direction of travel.
with 12.7 million tonnes of plastic finding its way into the ocean each year, people are finally starting to take notice.
and are looking for biodegradeable plastics such as
Polylactic Acid (PLA). PLA is biodegradable plastic derived from renewable plant-based sources such as cornstarch,
and only takes as little as six months to fully decompose in a composting facility.
could this be applied to fishing lines also
 

ohanzee

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With the internet we can now compare prices and find the cheapest,
which drives traders to be more competitive,
I'd say we are the unwitting driver of the direction of travel.
with 12.7 million tonnes of plastic finding its way into the ocean each year, people are finally starting to take notice.
and are looking for biodegradeable plastics such as
Polylactic Acid (PLA). PLA is biodegradable plastic derived from renewable plant-based sources such as cornstarch,
and only takes as little as six months to fully decompose in a composting facility.
could this be applied to fishing lines also
Don't you think if anyone really cared it would already be illegal to use anything that didn't biodegrade safely, they just need to pass a law and manufacturers would produce it.
Biodegradable materials for packaging has been around for decades now.
 

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