Black or bronze?

11foot5

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I’m not sure about black hooks, just a notion? I have this (irrational?) feeling that they won’t catch as well as bronze. Anybody have any opinions on this matter??!!
 

sthen

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If you ask for opinion, I agree with you. If you ask for knowledge, I'm not your man. A scientific comparison is almost hopeless to perform. Too many variables.
 

sightbob

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Thats actually a good question I've been tying lately on black, bronze and silver and couldn't tell you why I picked a certain hook
for what I tied. I think a traditional fly should have a bronze hook,
don't ask why. Funny most barbless seem to be black.
Going off the subject I read a book which said use a gold rib for during the day and silver for dull days or night time. So using that
theory is the hook to attract or just to carry a dressing.if I had to choose it would be bronze.
 

LukeNZ

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I like black hooks on dark flies, not sure if they catch anymore fish though.

Very nice looking fly and a very killer colour combo. I can tell you with great certainty that fly will catch big Tongariro trout! I tie up something very very similar, except have evolved it to using a trailing hook which turned more of the takes into solid hook ups.
If you are expecting to encounter rainbows, tie a couple up using orange metallic tinsel instead of the gold, and see how you go.
 

m r roid

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I've been using black hooks almost exclusively for the last 2-3 seasons. I've not seen any drop in my catch rate.....
 

LukeNZ

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If we accept the likely fact that a fish doesn’t know what a hook is for; and that a variation such as colour, or even shape, does not actually signal to a fish the intended purpose.
Then, hook colour really becomes relevant as a feature of the fly’s overall theme/scheme, and something that a fly fisher may leverage some advantage with?
It’s probably our individual perceptions of tradition which dictates the colours of the hooks we are inclined to use; anyone up for red hooks?
 

bobmiddlepoint

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If we accept the likely fact that a fish doesn’t know what a hook is for; and that a variation such as colour, or even shape, does not actually signal to a fish the intended purpose.
Then, hook colour really becomes relevant as a feature of the fly’s overall theme/scheme, and something that a fly fisher may leverage some advantage with?
It’s probably our individual perceptions of tradition which dictates the colours of the hooks we are inclined to use; anyone up for red hooks?
I'd go along with all of that.
To me trout flies just look right on bronze hooks and many salmon flies (especially shrimp style on trebles) only really look right on black hooks but I know this is really down to tradition and what I'm used to seeing.
Silver hooks look right for saltwater flies but there is does make some sense as the extra flash of silver can only help suggest baitfish.

Red hooks. I guy turned up once with a small red, black and silver snatcher type fly on a red Kamasan B170. The fly was a great success that week and I tied up some identical ones on bronze B170s but they didn't work anything like as well as those on the red hook (when fished side by side by two rods in the same boat). I think this is an example of the hook colour adding to or complementing the dressing. It also goes to show that sometimes very small adjustments to a tying do make a big difference - sometimes "a small black fly" isn't all you need ;)


Andy
 

BobP

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Like so much in fishing confidence is a major factor. I have absolute confidence in black or bronze hooks for trout & grayling flies. Gold, silver or red hooks do not give me anything like the same level of confidence and therefore I don't use them.

It's very much the same with tungsten beads. I have confidence in, and freely use, black, copper, silver, pink, green and rainbow. Other colours do not engender that same level of confidence.
 

ejw

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For me it is the type of hook, black or bronze, doesn't matter as long as the "shape" is right. I am not keen on the barbless range of hooks, so just crushed the barbs down on the range of hooks I use. As I have quite a few thousand hooks (mostly barbed) I have more than enough for my lifetime excepts for my Kamasan range i.e. B175's B440 and B410's or TCM 200's. These cover the majority of my normal flies. The other types of hooks I have generally fall into the same shapes to the above, quite a few are black and the fish do not notice the difference. May just be a confidence thing with the patterns.
 

PaulD

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I doubt that a trout offers much in the way of contemplation of the colour of the hook bend of a size 18 dry fly as it drifts over its head and similarly, when pursuing a traffic light blob from the depths, I doubt it's motivated by chasing the hook colour.
 

LukeNZ

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If hooks were olive or medium brown, I would be prepared to believe that they would be a better choice than bronze, silver, or black. However, trout logic probably doesn’t exist, let alone concur with ours.
 

taffy1

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If it looks edible to a fish, which are opportunist feeders, the colour of a hook is probably insignificant. The only way they test food items is with the mouth, take it or don't.
 

PaulD

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If it looks edible to a fish, which are opportunist feeders, the colour of a hook is probably insignificant. The only way they test food items is with the mouth, take it or don't.
If it looks like food, moves like food and it's where food should be . . . they'll probably take it.

This is why, when you gut a fish you'll at times find items like stones, twigs, cigarette butts etc . . . I once found a label from a pair of lady's tights.
 

steve collyer

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Aesthetically I much prefer using black hooks for dries.
I also much prefer the look of old-fashioned straight eyed long shank streamer hooks to standard 4x down eye lure hooks.
I have absolutely no idea why!
 

dave b

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I remember when the first silver nickel match hooks hit the shelves. Everybody said they wouldn't work however what they soon discovered was that fish didn't actually seem to mind and that a good hook pattern was simply a good hook pattern. Although I wouldn't choose silver for fly tying, I have no problems using black or bronze.
 

sthen

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Some people who favour 'silver' hooks claim that they 'disappear' by reflecting the surroundings...
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Some people who favour 'silver' hooks claim that they 'disappear' by reflecting the surroundings...

And some people like silver hooks for the added flash but... if you do a lot of spinning in small clear rivers it soon becomes clear that on some days in some light silver spinners do indeed disappear.

If you take a silver Mepps or Flying C (or Toby) and cast it into a clear river on a dull day you can clearly see the flash, flash , flash on each turn of the blade (or wobble of the Toby) as it comes through the water. Do the same on a sunny day and all of a sudden the blade just becomes a barely visible whirl. Change to a gold blade and you are back to a series of flashes. This effect tend to be more noticeable in clear rivers full of light such as chalkstreams rather than peaty ones with dark water but even there you will see some colours almost vanish in some lights.

I don't for one minute suggest that silver hooks become fully invisible (or need to) it is just an observation.


Andy
 
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