Bloodworm in the Spirit of Fly Fishing?

PaulD

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I suspect Halford would die from apoplexy were he able to see in many of today's fly boxes including mine.
Apoplexy at least with the sight of Sawyer's PTN . . . tied with wire not silk . . . good grief! Lead underbodies, brass and tungsten beads would have been the death of him! 150 years later there are still those who don't, can't or won't grasp the fact that fly fishing is a 'broad church' that gives us rein to fish whatever way appeals to us within the rules of the fishery. Dry fly on a Borders stream, lead line from a drifting reservoir boat, pike on the canal? There is no moral etiquette or hierarchy.
 

kingf000

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Hi all,

I’m a recent convert to fly fishing from coarse/carp. Is using an App Bloodworm proper fly fishing or not? When I’m struggling on flies and lures on reservoirs I switch to an App Bloodworm fished deep and it usually delivers. Seems too easy so I’m guessing it probably is. Let me know your thoughts.

Thanks,

Neilnige
I have had good days with apps bloodworm when nothing else has worked, other days - nothing! You do seem to imply that because it is easy (at times) and probably doesn't represent natural food, that it isn't proper fly fishing - IMO wrong. What about all those bright lures that look like nothing on earth and can be deadly when fished properly? I've had evenings when I've matched the hatch brilliantly and caught fish every cast - too easy so not in the spirit? This is opening up a can of worms (!!!). On reservoirs and rivers, is it the spirit of fly fishing to stock fish that are so hungry and naive that you can catch them on anything that doesn't remotely look like a natural insect, (even had them rising to a bright pink bung!)? You shoudn't worry about things like this, after all I doubt if you think that fishing with pellets for carp is not in the spirit of carp fishing!
 

tangled

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They don't actually lie static on the lake bed though do they. They live in burrows or tubes on the surface and as such are out of sight. They do however when disturbed swim with a vigorous figure of eight thrashing. OK 2'/second would be pushing it but they do wriggle like hell!


Andy
Yeh, they mostly seem to be invisible to fish being in tubes or burrows as you say. The larvae even seem to turn to pupa inside their cases or holes so in practice the bloodworm will be rarely seen fully by trout - just their heads poking out occasionally. (Some species do apparently live free roaming though.)

Anyhoo, the only way you could feasibly fish them imitatively would be virtually static on the bottom, Maybe a twitch and a tug now and then, but I seriously doubt that many fish them that way!

I've never used a squirmy in my waters - or an Apps, which is too big for our rules - but I've tied a couple of legal squirmies and I'm going to give it a go then next time the fish feel impossible.

Good lifecycle video

 

tangled

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You're not imitating the bloodworm unless you bury your fly in the silt. 😗
Have you ever found them in a spooned fish? I don't think I have but I haven't spooned a fish for many years and rarely bottom fish.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Have you ever found them in a spooned fish? I don't think I have but I haven't spooned a fish for many years and rarely bottom fish.
I don't think I have ever found the small red bloodworm in fish... except maybe a solitary individual... once in a blue moon sort of thing. However, back in the 1980s, there was a period of a few years when there were some giant green Chironomid larvae appearing in the Loch Leven fish. Not big numbers, but they were finding a few of them. These things were about an inch or even longer. No idea if they led a different lifestyle to the silt-burrowers, or if the fish were actively grubbing on the bottom for them. :unsure:
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Well FWIW I've seen hundreds of red bloodworms in fish. I don't know if they were stirred up by wind or had come out of the silt of their own accord. I've certainly seen plenty of free swimming bloodworms in farm ponds and the edges of muddy ressys.


Andy
 

Elwyman

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I'd say an Apps bloodworm is more imitative than a blob, booby or other similar inventions of the devil.😁
Back in the 90s I used to fish a small Stillwater in Staffordshire, where a most killing method was to fish a Red 'buzzer' consisting of a thread body built up near the hook eye to form a thorax, then all coated in a Red varnish. It was fished static on the bottom, with an occasional twitch. Deadly.
 

LukeNZ

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OMG not a blob....
Have never used a blob but generally just a bit of orange grabs attention of pre-occupied fish.. A tactic that the likes of Bob Church used to advocate, for those daphnia situations, or Castella moments.. 🙃

I tie these orange micro intruders for my swung fly algae feeders - the orange seems to be a big trigger for rainbows, maybe to do with their penchant for fish eggs

This on a size 8 streamer hook, ginger hackles to prop up the orange rabbit, spun in dubbin loop style. Simple to tie, med. chain bead black eyes for just the right amount of sub surface depth, on the swing.

BF624DA4-A392-4AC0-813C-462546ED4ADF.jpeg
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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Have never used a blob but generally just a bit of orange grabs attention of pre-occupied fish.. A tactic that the likes of Bob Church used to advocate, for those daphnia situations, or Castella moments.. 🙃

I tie these orange micro intruders for my swung fly algae feeders - the orange seems to be a big trigger for rainbows, maybe to do with their penchant for fish eggs

This on a size 8 streamer hook, ginger hackles to prop up the orange rabbit, spun in dubbin loop style. Simple to tie, med. chain bead black eyes for just the right amount of sub surface depth, on the swing.

View attachment 31137
That looks a lot like the wee dog of this woman I pass in the park most days...



😜

Aye, the folks who fish the American and Canadian rivers (and elsewhere) for steelheads and various salmon species with 'egg flies' would wonder why we get our knickers in such a twist about blobs and FABs and all the rest of it.

Col
 

original cormorant

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Have never used a blob but generally just a bit of orange grabs attention of pre-occupied fish.. A tactic that the likes of Bob Church used to advocate, for those daphnia situations, or Castella moments.. 🙃

I tie these orange micro intruders for my swung fly algae feeders - the orange seems to be a big trigger for rainbows, maybe to do with their penchant for fish eggs

This on a size 8 streamer hook, ginger hackles to prop up the orange rabbit, spun in dubbin loop style. Simple to tie, med. chain bead black eyes for just the right amount of sub surface depth, on the swing.

View attachment 31137
How can you call anything on a size 8 hook micro?
And frankly that is more effort to tie, probably less imitative and probably less effective than a blob. A blob is an honest fly.
 

LukeNZ

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That looks a lot like the wee dog of this woman I pass in the park most days...



😜

Aye, the folks who fish the American and Canadian rivers (and elsewhere) for steelheads and various salmon species with 'egg flies' would wonder why we get our knickers in such a twist about blobs and FABs and all the rest of it.

Col
Ah the small dog ! I can think of a few places here where the fish would certainly try to take it!

....fish egg "fly" patterns are the most productive fly on the Tongariro for bow's. I refuse to use them even when all else fails.. 😀

because I have fallen hard for two handed long rods, to more elegantly and much less epileptic-ally .. swing a long line on the wide rivers I fish; and given most trout are rainbows here on the North Island; essentially I have adopted steelhead methods and flies, but with scaled down line weight and fly sizes.

It is has become an obsession - because it really is a fun and effective way to catch bigger and more aggressive wild rainbows.
 
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LukeNZ

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How can you call anything on a size 8 hook micro?
And frankly that is more effort to tie, probably less imitative and probably less effective than a blob. A blob is an honest fly.
the average hook size I use is a size 6 for rainbows here. I don't go below 8lb. Maxima green either..
They hit em hard on the swing - wild rainbows at around 5lb. and up, become a real handful on fast moving water!
 

taffy1

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Worm fly, Secret Weapon, Tandems, Tubes, Waddingtons & Snakes....What's the category of "spirit" these lures fall into? I just go out to enjoy "My" fishing & couldn't care less what anyone else is doing.
 

taffy1

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×


Could you explain, clearly, what the 'spirit of fly fishing' is?

I couldn't and it really doesn't matter. (y)
Using rod, reel, line & lure to deceive a possible feeding fish to take your offering is about as close as I can make out....basically an act of deception. ;)
 

LukeNZ

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Worm fly, Secret Weapon, Tandems, Tubes, Waddingtons & Snakes....What's the category of "spirit" these lures fall into? I just go out to enjoy "My" fishing & couldn't care less what anyone else is doing.
Yes, indeed. Can only use single hook here, but I am keen on the trailing hook (better hook ups) style of steelhead type Intruder, scaled down, and also Greg Senyo and OPST micro shanks, small Waddington's, and small tube flies.

They all get the job done. Though it's great fun tying lots of different styles. I have a love affair with one streamer style for a bit, and then rediscover a style I haven't tied for a while, and then its back to the future all over again.

Sometimes after observing the way a fly/streamer swims/swings, or the way that it is approached by fish, and then tweaking the design to swim/swing just right, is all part of it.

I am glad they haven't found a cure for it yet!

🙃
 
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