Blue Damsels..

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GEK79

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Hello all you amazing fly tyers.. I'm in need of a little guidance and help..
This summer I was lucky enough to witness the damsel bloom on my lough lue males and the more subtle females..
Are there blue imitations. Where can I buy them please.
Thank you for any help and guidance..
 

Cap'n Fishy

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There is another recent thread on this subject. Have a look for it. If I remember, the consensus was that fish rarely get the chance to eat adult damsels here. The damsels are in the air, or laying eggs in amongst reeds at the water's edge - just not presenting themselves to the trout. There are a few notable exceptions - some YouTube clips of trout leaping out the water to catch adult damsels in Australia or New Zealand or somewhere. I've never seen it here. I see 100s of damsels at times, but I don't think I have ever found an adult damsel in a trout's stomach contents.

Col
 
G

GEK79

Guest
There is another recent thread on this subject. Have a look for it. If I remember, the consensus was that fish rarely get the chance to eat adult damsels here. The damsels are in the air, or laying eggs in amongst reeds at the water's edge - just not presenting themselves to the trout. There are a few notable exceptions - some YouTube clips of trout leaping out the water to catch adult damsels in Australia or New Zealand or somewhere. I've never seen it here. I see 100s of damsels at times, but I don't think I have ever found an adult damsel in a trout's stomach contents.

Col
Thanks Col it seems I've been lucky my first season on my lough I watched the trout taking damsels off the reeds and the following seasons I know they enjoy them..
 
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gmm243

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Mar 19, 2013
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I have fished Irish loughs for over 30 years.At times I have seen dozens and dozens of damsel flies.Have had them landing in my rod,on the boat and hovering all around.I have also often seen them mating and some lying crippled on the water.I have yet to see a trout take one.I do seem to remember that there was a sort of a "cocktail" that was popular for dapping on Corrib for grilse that used a blue damsel and possibly a daddy or a mayfly but I have never used it.
In smaller still waters I have found damsel larvae in the stomachs of both browns and rainbows but never on bigger loughs.
 

tangled

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I have some empathy for your observations.

One of the small stillwaters I fish has vast quantities of the blue damsels. One day I was walking behind the hawthorn hedge to fish it and I heard the sound of people throwing half bricks into the water.

When I got to the gate I saw a trout porpoise out of the water and take a damsel. Then another. They were going bonkers for them creating a racket and the damsels were everywhere.

I have a couple of dry damsels (blue) but they wouldn't touch them, but they were very happy to take a big dry daddy, One of the most exciting day's fishing I've had. Bit of a one-off though, didn't work two days later.
 
G

GEK79

Guest
I have fished Irish loughs for over 30 years.At times I have seen dozens and dozens of damsel flies.Have had them landing in my rod,on the boat and hovering all around.I have also often seen them mating and some lying crippled on the water.I have yet to see a trout take one.I do seem to remember that there was a sort of a "cocktail" that was popular for dapping on Corrib for grilse that used a blue damsel and possibly a daddy or a mayfly but I have never used it.
In smaller still waters I have found damsel larvae in the stomachs of both browns and rainbows but never on bigger loughs.
Be interesting to see where you fish.. The day in question I had lapped the small lough twice I sat down for a brew and was admiring the damsels I'm sure it was a mating pair were nearing the bottom of a Reed and a trout smashed them I shook my head and watched a short while later the same thing occurred a blue damsel was hovering and I thought that's a bad idea and bang the damsel had been taken.. I finished my brew and tried with a daddy only big fly I had.. Same this year I dint witness the taking of damsels but the fish were enjoying them..
 

Mies

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Donegal fish will eat anything :sick: ;)

 

taffy1

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Well within my comfort zone
I read somewhere, a long time back that if fish are chasing damsels, a Teal, Blue & Silver is a good substitute & worth trying. You could give it a go if you don't find what you are after. Tight lines. (y)
 
G

GEK79

Guest
I read somewhere, a long time back that if fish are chasing damsels, a Teal, Blue & Silver is a good substitute & worth trying. You could give it a go if you don't find what you are after. Tight lines. (y)
Thanks fella now I know there's the argument about fish seeing colours and spectrums and other colour related topics but I can't find the bright blue damsels.. I'll have a look could you recommend a decent place to buy. Please..
 

arkle

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On one water not far from me, the damsel hatch has to be seen to be believed, honestly it's that dense, you cannot see the other side of the lake which is some 200mts away. The colour of the nymph, is a very pale yellow olive, so it might be worthwhile adding a few to your box.
 
G

GEK79

Guest
On one water not far from me, the damsel hatch has to be seen to be believed, honestly it's that dense, you cannot see the other side of the lake which is some 200mts away. The colour of the nymph, is a very pale yellow olive, so it might be worthwhile adding a few to your box.
And do the trout take them.. I've not had a late evening cast in the lough which is frustrating as I'm sure the evening light would be amazing. I will have a look for some damsel nymphs.. Thank you.
Gary
 

silver creek

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Feb 14, 2011
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731
Hello all you amazing fly tyers.. I'm in need of a little guidance and help..
This summer I was lucky enough to witness the damsel bloom on my lough lue males and the more subtle females..
Are there blue imitations. Where can I buy them please.
Thank you for any help and guidance..

My mentor and friend, Gary Borger, wrote a book called Designing Trout Flies. On the cover is his braided butt blue damsel fly.



It is the best adult blue damsel pattern I have.



The tying instructions for the Borger Blue Damsel is below:

Gary Borger » Braided Butt Damsel

https://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/fishing/2010/03/tietalk-braided-butt-damsel

Some tiers have used foam to modify the pattern to guarantee a floating fly such as in the pattern below:




I mentioned this to Gary and he asked me whether the tiers had thought he had not considered foam. According to Gary, the trout can concentrate on the drowned damsels and the foam pattern cannot imitate drowned damsels because they always float. So tie the standard pattern first and add a few foam ones if you want. Compare the Borger damsel with other damsel patterns and you will note how realistic the braided butt pattern looks compared to foam, dyed deer hair, or dubbed abdomen patterns. None of these can match the thin abdomen of the natural insect.

This is what Jason Borger wrote about his father's braided butt damsel pattern: ""One question that I/we often get about this fly (inspired by a pattern that my father saw in New Zealand back in the 1980s) is,“Why don’t you use foam for the post, it floats better?” The answer is based on years of observing damselfly hatches and is fairly simple: because sometimes we want the fly to sink. If that sounds odd, keep in mind that “dry flies” (or perhaps more accurately “dry insects”) sometimes aren’t so dry…."

And use a strong tippet. The vicious take can often break you off.

Another point is that the stage before the mature blue damsel is the brown teneral phase. You can use a brown color marker to match the mono to tie up a few teneral patterns. The brown teneral patterns will also match brown dragon flies.








Cortland braided mono comes in 30 and 50 lb strengths. Get the 50 if you can. You can use the braided mono for making braided loops and the 50 lb is stronger.

The video below shows how damsels are vulnerable when they are under the water and how they get trapped in the film. A foam damsel pattern can't get that trapped in the film appearance.


 
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G

GEK79

Guest
My mentor and friend, Gary Borger, wrote a book called Designing Trout Flies. On the cover is his braided butt blue damsel fly.



It is the best adult blue damsel pattern I have.





Tying instructions are below:

Gary Borger » Braided Butt Damsel

https://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/fishing/2010/03/tietalk-braided-butt-damsel

Some tiers have used foam to modify the pattern to guarantee a floating fly such as in the pattern below:




I mentioned this to Gary and he asked me whether the tiers had thought he had not considered foam. According to Gary, the trout can concentrate on the drowned damsels and the foam pattern cannot imitate drowned damsels because they always float. So tie the standard pattern first and add a few foam ones if you want. Compare the Borger damsel with other damsel patterns and you will note how realistic the braided butt pattern looks compared to foam, dyed deer hair, or dubbed abdomen patterns. None of these can match the thin abdomen of the natural insect.

This is what Jason Borger wrote about his father's braided butt damsel pattern: ""One question that I/we often get about this fly (inspired by a pattern that my father saw in New Zealand back in the 1980s) is,“Why don’t you use foam for the post, it floats better?” The answer is based on years of observing damselfly hatches and is fairly simple: because sometimes we want the fly to sink. If that sounds odd, keep in mind that “dry flies” (or perhaps more accurately “dry insects”) sometimes aren’t so dry…."

And use a strong tippet. The vicious take can often break you off.

Another point is that the stage before the mature blue damsel is the brown teneral phase. You can use a brown color marker to match the mono to tie up a few teneral patterns. The brown teneral patterns will also match brown dragon flies.








Cortland braided mono comes in 30 and 50 lb strengths. Get the 50 if you can. You can use the braided mono for making braided loops and the 50 lb is stronger.

The video below shows how damsels are vulnerable when they are under the water and how they get trapped in the film. A foam damsel pattern can't get that trapped in the film appearance.


Thank you so much..
 

mackiia1

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Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
2,588
Location
Waterford - Ireland
There is another recent thread on this subject. Have a look for it. If I remember, the consensus was that fish rarely get the chance to eat adult damsels here. The damsels are in the air, or laying eggs in amongst reeds at the water's edge - just not presenting themselves to the trout. There are a few notable exceptions - some YouTube clips of trout leaping out the water to catch adult damsels in Australia or New Zealand or somewhere. I've never seen it here. I see 100s of damsels at times, but I don't think I have ever found an adult damsel in a trout's stomach contents.

Col
I fish a 40 acre Stillwater here in Ireland - stocked with Rainbows and Browns.
I have caught the Rainbows using a green nymph but a few years ago I caught 2 Browns - and both of them were stuffed to the gills with the bright Blue adults. One spewed them up in the net.
Haven't seen it since.
 
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