Brackish water sea trout

lipslicker

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Hopefully someone will recall a thread from about a year ago about sea trout that stay around the coast of their river, neither migrating further nor back up river?
Reaching large sizes and being very dark coloured in appearance, and sometimes reaching very old age?
From memory, around Orkney.

A sort of saltwater Ferox?

Didn't concentrate too much at the time, but a mate has seen sea trout - large, very dark in colour - around my coast, which a friend of his said lived in the weed and kelp throughout the year.

Trying to recall the name, or term, for such sea trout. I am pretty sure they had a specific name.

Anyone remember?
Cheers,
 

aenoon

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Hopefully someone will recall a thread from about a year ago about sea trout that stay around the coast of their river, neither migrating further nor back up river?
Reaching large sizes and being very dark coloured in appearance, and sometimes reaching very old age?
From memory, around Orkney.

A sort of saltwater Ferox?

Didn't concentrate too much at the time, but a mate has seen sea trout - large, very dark in colour - around my coast, which a friend of his said lived in the weed and kelp throughout the year.

Trying to recall the name, or term, for such sea trout. I am pretty sure they had a specific name.

Anyone remember?
Cheers,
Slob trout.
regards
Bert
 

ohanzee

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Its not unusual to see sea trout in salt water, and they can have very dark backs, they mosey about in the Clyde estuary miles from river mouths, presumably waiting for rain to raise the river level.
 

BobP

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Sea trout don't go far out to sea like salmon but spend their marine lives close to the coast which is why they are so vulnerable to the sea lice infestations from coastal salmon farms.
 

lipslicker

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Sea trout don't go far out to sea like salmon but spend their marine lives close to the coast which is why they are so vulnerable to the sea lice infestations from coastal salmon farms.

Ah, I have definitely learnt something there, cheers.
I just assumed they behaved like salmon, migrating Far then returning when much older.
Intersting.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Hopefully someone will recall a thread from about a year ago about sea trout that stay around the coast of their river, neither migrating further nor back up river?
Reaching large sizes and being very dark coloured in appearance, and sometimes reaching very old age?
From memory, around Orkney.

A sort of saltwater Ferox?

Didn't concentrate too much at the time, but a mate has seen sea trout - large, very dark in colour - around my coast, which a friend of his said lived in the weed and kelp throughout the year.

Trying to recall the name, or term, for such sea trout. I am pretty sure they had a specific name.

Anyone remember?
Cheers,

I find it helps if you regard brown trout and sea trout as one and the same... which they are. Sea trout are nothing more than brown trout that migrate to salt water to take advantage of the better feeding to be had there. In any population of the species, Salmo trutta, there will be those that go to sea, while others stay home. It benefits the females most to go to sea, as they need the bigger body mass to produce eggs, while males can stay home and produce enough milt without putting on body weight. In many populations, five in every six sea trout are females.

In the southern hemisphere, they refer to the fish we call sea trout as "sea-run browns". They are the more accurate!

In many systems, there is no 'black and white' between sea trout and brown trout, but more of a 'greyscale'. Loch Lomond is a good example (Orkney too). Studies have shown that the trout in Lomond may have spent their entire lives in freshwater, or may have gone to sea as a juvenile and returned as a mature adult, ready to breed. However, for every one of either of those, there are others that have been up and down the system like a jack-in-the-box... in and out between freshwater and salt, to the point where you would be hard-pushed to call them either a brown or a sea trout.

What would you call this fish?

Lomond06Oct2017_1789.jpg


Many would call that a brown trout. But if you fished for it in the loch in May to July, you wouldn't catch it, because it only appears in August/September time. Where has it been?

Col
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Hopefully someone will recall a thread from about a year ago about sea trout that stay around the coast of their river, neither migrating further nor back up river?
Reaching large sizes and being very dark coloured in appearance, and sometimes reaching very old age?
From memory, around Orkney.

A sort of saltwater Ferox?

Didn't concentrate too much at the time, but a mate has seen sea trout - large, very dark in colour - around my coast, which a friend of his said lived in the weed and kelp throughout the year.

Trying to recall the name, or term, for such sea trout. I am pretty sure they had a specific name.

Anyone remember?
Cheers,

The trout of the River Ythan in Aberdeenshire, are effectively "brackish water sea trout". They live in the river estuary, their main diet being sandeels. Everyone calls them sea trout, and there is no doubt that is what they are. But they don't need to go beyond the estuary to get big...

0784.jpg


07721.jpg


0815.jpg


1210.jpg


1248.jpg
 

ohanzee

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The trout of the River Ythan in Aberdeenshire, are effectively "brackish water sea trout". They live in the river estuary, their main diet being sandeels. Everyone calls them sea trout, and there is no doubt that is what they are. But they don't need to go beyond the estuary to get big...

0784.jpg

Is there a season or yearly time to catch there?

Phrased that badly, obviously there is a season but are they 'there' all the time?
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Is there a season or yearly time to catch there?

Phrased that badly, obviously there is a season but are they 'there' all the time?

Dunno the details. I have only fished it that one time. I would suspect there will be better times and poorer times. Many factors involved, not least these guys...

1073.jpg
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Is there a season or yearly time to catch there?

Phrased that badly, obviously there is a season but are they 'there' all the time?

By the way... I should add, it's not just a case of turning up 5 minutes before they start rising, if that is what you are imagining... :whistle:
 

ohanzee

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By the way... I should add, it's not just a case of turning up 5 minutes before they start rising, if that is what you are imagining... :whistle:

I was curious of whether they move in and out seasonally or live there, it has a bearing on their behaviour as so called slob trout or 'sea trout'.
 

Lewis Chessman

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I remember fishing a Lewis sea loch in late April some years ago catching over 20 sea trout, none of them kelt-ish. As the main runs tend to enter fresh water in mid-June onward those fish were certainly coastal feeders.
A book about the Finsbay syndicate (Harris) pointed out that Finsbay fish seldom exceeded 1 1/2 lbs whilst those from a neighbouring estate would frequently top the 3 lb mark suggesting that each systems' fish fed locally to their home waters.

When helping the OHFT with their sea trout smolt surveys in March/April two years back we netted two pre-tagged fish, X51 and X53, first caught in the same sea pool the previous October. A few weeks later X51 and X52 were caught in a different pool on the same bay about 1 mile from the first as the crow flies (more as the fish swims!).
This suggested to me that the fish tend to stick together in a 'familiar' shoal for quite long periods.

On the other hand I recall reading of a large sea trout caught and tagged on the English south coast (Hamps. Avon?) which was re-caught in an Aberdeenshire river, either 500+ miles or 700+ miles away depending on which route it had taken!
 

ohanzee

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I remember fishing a Lewis sea loch in late April some years ago catching over 20 sea trout, none of them kelt-ish. As the main runs tend to enter fresh water in mid-June onward those fish were certainly coastal feeders.
A book about the Finsbay syndicate (Harris) pointed out that Finsbay fish seldom exceeded 1 1/2 lbs whilst those from a neighbouring estate would frequently top the 3 lb mark suggesting that each systems' fish fed locally to their home waters.

When helping the OHFT with their sea trout smolt surveys in March/April two years back we netted two pre-tagged fish, X51 and X53, first caught in the same sea pool the previous October. A few weeks later X51 and X52 were caught in a different pool on the same bay about 1 mile from the first as the crow flies (more as the fish swims!).
This suggested to me that the fish tend to stick together in a 'familiar' shoal for quite long periods.

On the other hand I recall reading of a large sea trout caught and tagged on the English south coast (Hamps. Avon?) which was re-caught in an Aberdeenshire river, either 500+ miles or 700+ miles away depending on which route it had taken!

I'm struggling to see the difference between sea trout and slob trout? is there one?
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I'm struggling to see the difference between sea trout and slob trout? is there one?

As I said above, - in a lot of places it's a 'greyscale' thing, between 100% freshwater brown trout and the 'idea' of a 'sea trout'. I doubt you will find anyone associated with the Ythan who refers to their fish as anything other than sea trout... and why should they? 'Slob Trout' are an Irish thing. The Ythan estuary is salt water and the fish in it are 'sea trout', inasmuch as they are clearly not freshwater brown trout.

It's largely semantics to fit with romanticism that has nothing to do with zoology. They are all Salmo trutta, and their habits vary enormously from system to system.
 

easker1

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the Falklands Islands Have sea run browns trout as they were introduced as Browns there but as the river is so short they run to sea to get sustainance,I know some one who works and fishes there, easker1
 

Cap'n Fishy

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the Falklands Islands Have sea run browns trout as they were introduced as Browns there but as the river is so short they run to sea to get sustainance,I know some one who works and fishes there, easker1

So does Patagonia, and anywhere else that brown trout were introduced. It's because brown trout and sea trout are the same fish! If you stock a river with brown trout, you will in due course get a balance of brown trout and sea trout. If you stock a river with 'sea trout', you will in due course get a balance of sea trout and brown trout. They are the same fish.

Col
 

ohanzee

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So does Patagonia, and anywhere else that brown trout were introduced. It's because brown trout and sea trout are the same fish! If you stock a river with brown trout, you will in due course get a balance of brown trout and sea trout. If you stock a river with 'sea trout', you will in due course get a balance of sea trout and brown trout. They are the same fish.

Col

We all know this, the curiosity for me is do they do this outside of breeding?
 

bobmiddlepoint

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On the other hand I recall reading of a large sea trout caught and tagged on the English south coast (Hamps. Avon?) which was re-caught in an Aberdeenshire river, either 500+ miles or 700+ miles away depending on which route it had taken!

Not heard the Hants Avon to Aberdeen fish but there was the Axe to Tweed fish.
In a good year there must be in excess of 100,000 sea trout smolts going to sea around the coasts of Dorset, Devon and Cornwall and yet sea trout caught in the sea there are almost unknown which suggests they don't hang about too close to the shore or their home rivers.
It is also the case that some Tweed sea trout travel all the way to Denmark to feed.

On the other hand I've seen the results of recent tracking studies done in Loch Laxford and one of the Skye sea lochs and those fish did indeed stay very close to home, some not going more than a mile in a year.

Funny old things sea trout, never surprised and what they can do.


Andy
 

easker1

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no need to shout Colin I only brought it up I wasn't trying to contradict you , I have been through this before, easker1
 

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