Brackish water sea trout

ohanzee

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Back doors of hotels and restaurants is a good spot to look. Then there is private sales and the barter system.

I can't believe this still goes on to any extent, only spoken to one hotel chef but he said no one would risk losing a licence to trade over it, I can't see there being a big enough market in the few that would still do it.
You can buy wild salmon on the internet, but I'm not altogether convinced that market is big enough to account for numbers big enough to notice a difference when they stop for covid, strange lack of information around it.
 

codyarrow

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I can't believe this still goes on to any extent, only spoken to one hotel chef but he said no one would risk losing a licence to trade over it, I can't see there being a big enough market in the few that would still do it.

Did some joinery in a local hotel about 5 years ago. Man walked in the back door of the kitchen with salmon. Not sure there is that much risk, or serious enough penalties.
 

bobmiddlepoint

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I think some sea trout tend to have very small heads and tails, because of them growing very fast.

There is probably a degree of that going on although I'm not sure that finnock actually grow quicker than older sea trout (although I guess very old ones probably do slow down).
I had a 5/6lb sea trout on Saturday and thought "that tail looks a bit titchy" but this might in part be because on the Naver you see nothing but salmon usually so I've got used to looking at big tails!


Andy
 

easker1

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there is still drift netting off the Tyne but not in the estuary, I think now there are only 8 licences available 4 north and 4 south, very tightly regulated, so wild fish can be had easker1
 

bobmiddlepoint

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This is really interesting and the clear inference is that the lack of activity by trawlers/netsmen is at least partially responsible for what seems to be a good run of salmon in many rivers. My question is, where would the salmon that might have been netted in previous years have been sold, as presumably there is no quota for a legal catch?


I just don't know. Some, as said, will appear around the back of hotels. I've heard (and have no reason to doubt) that Hebridean poached salmon leave for the continet packed with legal shellfish.
But who is to say the sandeel trawlers aren't getting a by catch of salmon smolts and just chucking them into the mix? What might be getting netted on the high seas and dumped or landed away from prying eyes. I've been watching the bear cams on the Brooks River in Alaska this summer, the runs of Sockeye salmon are said to be record ones this year, about double the usual number (800,000 fish over the falls!). Where have all those extra fish come from? Russians not hammering them? Something has happened.


Andy
 

easker1

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I heard this a few years back that one Purser From Ullapool , landed it's catch in Esbjerg because it was mainly salmon, this was from a buyer in Ullapool this was a catch in hundreds of tons, taken on the west coast, I do know when the pursers tied up in Gairloch they all had a gill net out astern, so they weren't fussed about the legality, easker1
 

aenoon

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What do you mean by 'British waters'? fisheries are devolved, and I think the areas we are talking about are in Scottish waters where the sand eels are.
That one made me smile.
Inshore fishing border between England and Scotland in the North seas start at Arbroath!
Was an arrangement sneaked in to procure our devolution, certain irony there!
Besides sand eels larvae "migrate" more than the sea trout that feed on them, congregating on the Dogger bank, and fisher bank, where sandy substrates are more common, and also where the Danes scoop them up en masse.
 
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aenoon

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there is still drift netting off the Tyne but not in the estuary, I think now there are only 8 licences available 4 north and 4 south, very tightly regulated, so wild fish can be had easker1
Still a net and cobble operation in tweed estuary at Berwick, 4 netting stations operating under licence there.
Can be seen operating right under the high breakwater/promenade wall.
 

easker1

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used to watch the Netsmen at Spittal , there was once 12 stations on the Tyne , in the 30's 25,000 fish caught at one station, the price at Billingsgate went down to 1/6 a pound, about 7-1/2 pence ,easker1
 

Laxdale

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I heard this a few years back that one Purser From Ullapool , landed it's catch in Esbjerg because it was mainly salmon, this was from a buyer in Ullapool this was a catch in hundreds of tons, taken on the west coast, I do know when the pursers tied up in Gairloch they all had a gill net out astern, so they weren't fussed about the legality, easker1
Probably sooked them out of a cage.
Salmon are now a very worthwhile catch for poachers, but large scale commercial boats do not target them.
Yes, they do go straight to the continent in shellfish lorries. Yes, salmon get sold door to door.
The reason there is a greater abundance of salmon this year? Quite simple....the latest agreement to stop commercial exploitation in Faroese and Greenland waters has now kicked in.
 

bobmiddlepoint

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The reason there is a greater abundance of salmon this year? Quite simple....the latest agreement to stop commercial exploitation in Faroese and Greenland waters has now kicked in.

Somehow I have completely missed the news about the Greenland/Faroes fishery being curtailed. Is it a complete stop or a reduced quota?

Who negotiated it?

Andy
 

tingvollr

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Somehow I have completely missed the news about the Greenland/Faroes fishery being curtailed. Is it a complete stop or a reduced quota?

Who negotiated it?

Andy
Not sure if this is what you are referring to Andy.
Mike
 

tingvollr

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I don't think this is the reason that salmon runs have dramatically increased this year. The agreement merely continues from the expiry of the original agreement in 1991.
 

lipslicker

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Sea trout netters on my local bit of coastline, Filey Bay, were stopped about 3 or 4 years ago. Generations of same families had netted the bay and then their licenses were revoked.

I long for someone to take charge of our waters and almost ban fishing for ten years, then, when stocks have fully recovered, to resume at current levels, or hopefully even more.

The more capital you have, the more interest you can take. At the moment it seems they are constantly walking the line.

For instance, only four years ago the EU announced North Sea cod stocks were healthy, gave them a sustainability badge and upped the catch allowances.
Just 18 months later they announced they were seriously endangered and at risk of collapse.
That is an absolute travesty.

Off Whitby, huge trawlers were going up and down the coast. Smaller boats were reporting wrecks, reefs and all substrate was completely flattened, to the extent there was zero cover or features for the fish to live on.

On Henry Gilbey's blog, he recently had some figures on bass landings down in Cornwall, particularly out of Mevagissey. The increases in landings have been truly shocking, particularly as the shore fishing boys have been reporting struggles.

South coast absolutely netted out of wrasse, a slow growing reef fish, after their price went through the roof. They were being transported live up to fish farms in Scotland, where they were used to eat sea lice of their fish. Needless to say, the vast majority died in transport.

And we all know the salmon, sea trout and sandeel stories.

I think our nation could really benefit from, say, a healthy bass sport fishery, like the striper one in the US. A fish caught a few times is worth a great deal more to the economy than one caught and killed just the once, I would argue.

Sadly, I doubt I will have my wishes granted in my lifetime, and I sometimes question if the young generation will be able to fish at all when they are our age.
Probably have to do it on PlayStation or something.
 

aenoon

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Sea trout netters on my local bit of coastline, Filey Bay, were stopped about 3 or 4 years ago. Generations of same families had netted the bay and then their licenses were revoked.

I long for someone to take charge of our waters and almost ban fishing for ten years, then, when stocks have fully recovered, to resume at current levels, or hopefully even more.

The more capital you have, the more interest you can take. At the moment it seems they are constantly walking the line.

For instance, only four years ago the EU announced North Sea cod stocks were healthy, gave them a sustainability badge and upped the catch allowances.
Just 18 months later they announced they were seriously endangered and at risk of collapse.
That is an absolute travesty.

Off Whitby, huge trawlers were going up and down the coast. Smaller boats were reporting wrecks, reefs and all substrate was completely flattened, to the extent there was zero cover or features for the fish to live on.

On Henry Gilbey's blog, he recently had some figures on bass landings down in Cornwall, particularly out of Mevagissey. The increases in landings have been truly shocking, particularly as the shore fishing boys have been reporting struggles.

South coast absolutely netted out of wrasse, a slow growing reef fish, after their price went through the roof. They were being transported live up to fish farms in Scotland, where they were used to eat sea lice of their fish. Needless to say, the vast majority died in transport.

And we all know the salmon, sea trout and sandeel stories.

I think our nation could really benefit from, say, a healthy bass sport fishery, like the striper one in the US. A fish caught a few times is worth a great deal more to the economy than one caught and killed just the once, I would argue.

Sadly, I doubt I will have my wishes granted in my lifetime, and I sometimes question if the young generation will be able to fish at all when they are our age.
Probably have to do it on PlayStation or something.

Might just be our current negotiators are playing hard ball with EU regarding access to our waters now we have left EU.
Hope they keep it going.
Regards
Bert
 

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