Buzz Olive

PaulD

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Feb 11, 2020
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Location
South Northants
This is a very old pattern ( prior to 1940) from the Rev. Edward Powell. The 'buzz' means that is a hackled pattern and this is typical of the style of Powell's patterns for fishing the Border streams like the Corve and the Onny - heavily hackled (my dressing is not as heavily hackled as Powell's originals, neither are the hackle fibres as long!), also with 'robust' dubbed fur bodies. His dry flies are remarkably different from those spawned on the chalkstreams of Hampshire and reflect the need for flies that would remain afloat on the more turbulent Wales / England border streams.

Buzz Olive - Rev. Edward Powell

Hook:
Daiichi 1110, Size 16
Thread: Veevus 16/0, Olive
Tail: Olive hackle fibres
Rib: X Fine Oval Gold
Body: Mix of Yellow Seals Fur and Picric dyed Mole
Shoulder Hackle: Olive cock(half size of head hackle)
Head Hackle: Blue Dun

Buzz Olive (2).JPG
 

GEK79

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Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
1,863
Location
Ireland
This is a very old pattern ( prior to 1940) from the Rev. Edward Powell. The 'buzz' means that is a hackled pattern and this is typical of the style of Powell's patterns for fishing the Border streams like the Corve and the Onny - heavily hackled (my dressing is not as heavily hackled as Powell's originals, neither are the hackle fibres as long!), also with 'robust' dubbed fur bodies. His dry flies are remarkably different from those spawned on the chalkstreams of Hampshire and reflect the need for flies that would remain afloat on the more turbulent Wales / England border streams.

Buzz Olive - Rev. Edward Powell

Hook:
Daiichi 1110, Size 16
Thread: Veevus 16/0, Olive
Tail: Olive hackle fibres
Rib: X Fine Oval Gold
Body: Mix of Yellow Seals Fur and Picric dyed Mole
Shoulder Hackle: Olive cock(half size of head hackle)
Head Hackle: Blue Dun

View attachment 32042
As usual quality..
 

Uncas

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Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
270
Location
Yorkshire
It must be very interesting fishing pre-war patens, how do the flies compare with modern counterparts?
Excellent quality tying sir.
 

PaulD

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Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
1,483
Location
South Northants
It must be very interesting fishing pre-war patterns, how do the flies compare with modern counterparts?

That's an interesting question! The Rev. Powell, when he was Vicar of Munslow, would disguise his dog collar by wearing a scarf and raincoat, to enable himself, more freely, to investigate the stock being held by local poulterers and game dealers in order to find capes and skins to permit him to tie his flies. The original dressing for his famous Orange Otter requires the body is made from 'pale biscuit-coloured underpart of an otter's throat, soaked overnight in Picric acid solution, plus an equal volume of red ink, plus an equal amount of water.' I use a blend of Zelon dubbing to achieve the correct shade and, I suspect, that if Superfine or Zelon Dubbing was available to Powell he would have grabbed it gleefully. Similarly, the size and quality of hackle available to him locally would not compare in any way to the qulaity of Whiting and Metz saddles and capes we can easily buy (apart from the price!) today. His flies had many wraps of quite soft hackle that was very long in the fibre to ensure its flotation and I surmise, with today's materials and floatants, his 'signature' flies would look significantly different if he were to tie them today.

Mind you, I have done very well, early season, with a Baby Sun Fly tied to his original recipe - black fur from a rabbit's face etc.
 
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