Camp in my garden

3lbgrayling

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
31,945
Location
Central Scotland
Can I make a point.Most folk find camping uncomfortable 1st time and don't repeat the experience.Because they buy rubbish gear.
1.You need to buy a good tent
2 You need good sleeping bags
3 you need to have reliable cooking equipment (and are confident in how to use it)
4 you need to be prepared for wet /windy/cold weather

Jim
 

anzac

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Messages
2,181
Location
Terra Firma
Can I make a point.Most folk find camping uncomfortable 1st time and don't repeat the experience.Because they buy rubbish gear.
1.You need to buy a good tent
2 You need good sleeping bags
3 you need to have reliable cooking equipment (and are confident in how to use it)
4 you need to be prepared for wet /windy/cold weather

Jim
What he said.

Buy good kit including air mattresses -- think COMFORT. Make sure the tents have floor, are roomy, and come with rain flies. Have some plastic painter's drop sheets on hand to put down under the tents and to create rain awnings.

Have a back up plan -- just in case. My youngest son and his family in the US went camping in a Southern California mountains state park, only to find that their campsite was overrun by ants that got into everything. They had a plan B (a different state park 20 miles away) that saved the weekend.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
46,455
This is genius from a business perspective, for England and Wales that don't have the camping freedoms it's a no brainer, why has it not happened sooner?

First timers can get a bit of advice, or rent what they need from the entrepreneurial genius that is...a person with a field...I'm calling that 'Rent a Tent', essentially a wild camp site, going by the numbers pouring north to do it the need is there and the numbers wanting to in England are vast.

Get on it DB, they can park in the field, no concrete pillars to hit :)
 

aenoon

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 12, 2009
Messages
13,118
Location
Linlithgow, Scotland and anywhere i can wet a line
Can I make a point.Most folk find camping uncomfortable 1st time and don't repeat the experience.Because they buy rubbish gear.
1.You need to buy a good tent
2 You need good sleeping bags
3 you need to have reliable cooking equipment (and are confident in how to use it)
4 you need to be prepared for wet /windy/cold weather

Jim
All of that, plus the caveat, dont leave any of it behind when you leave!
 

mr_eejit

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Messages
469
Location
Derry/North of Ireland
Tried camping in the garden when I was a kid, nearly burned ourselves to death, lucky a friend of mine who was there with us, God rest his soul saved us and got us out, we had a gasoline light in the tent, someone accidentally hit it with there head and it disconnected from the lamp, the tent went up in a ball of flames with us in it, he managed to push us out, btw he didn't die in the tent, unfortunately he took his own life in the River Foyle some years later. RIP smurf. That was his nickname incase anyone wants to have a sarky comment. So camping in the garden is a no go for me, it's years since that incident anyway, I now live in a bungalow with concrete garden so it would be hard for the pegs to go in 😁
 
Last edited:

doobrysnatcher

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
3,860
Location
ireland
Loved camping when I was younger every year we me and my buddies would hitch hike a ride to ballybunnion with hardlly no money betweeñ us best days of my life first time I went camping was out the back we stayed awake till it got bright
 

4wings

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 10, 2019
Messages
1,065
Location
Bristol
I always used to camp in the garden as a lad and my two boys insisted I camped there with them.
It always amazed me what was about, cats, hedgehogs, even bats clinging to the canvas.
 

Dingbat

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 2, 2008
Messages
5,686
Location
Switzerland
This is genius from a business perspective, for England and Wales that don't have the camping freedoms it's a no brainer, why has it not happened sooner?

First timers can get a bit of advice, or rent what they need from the entrepreneurial genius that is...a person with a field...I'm calling that 'Rent a Tent', essentially a wild camp site, going by the numbers pouring north to do it the need is there and the numbers wanting to in England are vast.

Get on it DB, they can park in the field, no concrete pillars to hit :)
I can think of a number of reasons why db should be increasing the incline to north-face dimensions:

294227_1.jpg
 

paul100

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 2, 2011
Messages
491
I understand that Douglas its not for everybody - however I'm sat chilling outside our tent in The Derbyshire Dale's the hard work is done the divorce has been put off until the next camping trip (we always fall out over putting up the canvas) and the beers cold. The river Dove is 2 miles away but ive not brought a rod but hey ho - the kids are happy - and the mrs too - job done in my eyes - where the beers 👍

Paul
 

eddleston123

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 3, 2012
Messages
10,027
Location
Peebles, Scottish Borders
I understand that Douglas its not for everybody - however I'm sat chilling outside our tent in The Derbyshire Dale's the hard work is done the divorce has been put off until the next camping trip (we always fall out over putting up the canvas) and the beers cold. The river Dove is 2 miles away but ive not brought a rod but hey ho - the kids are happy - and the mrs too - job done in my eyes - where the beers 👍

Paul
In days gone bye, my wife and I used to take the kids (then 7& 9 years old) camping.

I think that is what has 'put me off'


Douglas
 

Black sheep

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2021
Messages
92
Location
Area 51
Oh
Can I make a point.Most folk find camping uncomfortable 1st time and don't repeat the experience.Because they buy rubbish gear.
1.You need to buy a good tent
2 You need good sleeping bags
3 you need to have reliable cooking equipment (and are confident in how to use it)
4 you need to be prepared for wet /windy/cold weather

Jim
agreed Jim, we are seasoned campers. Our camp is quite a sight including main tent leading to event shelter with table and chairs. Camp toilet and I even put the hammock up under a tarp just for lounging. Huge cool box and a proper kitchen. Quality sleeping arrangements too!

We even converted the mother in law who can’t be more than 10mtrs from a socket at any one time
 

Vintage Badger

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
968
Location
Cheshire
Oh

agreed Jim, we are seasoned campers. Our camp is quite a sight including main tent leading to event shelter with table and chairs. Camp toilet and I even put the hammock up under a tarp just for lounging. Huge cool box and a proper kitchen. Quality sleeping arrangements too!

We even converted the mother in law who can’t be more than 10mtrs from a socket at any one time
I have a TV and DVD player for my tent! 😜
 

Vintage Badger

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
968
Location
Cheshire
I don’t go that far! I try and stick to sites that allow fires. That’s our tv
One of my other hobbies is collecting and restoring vintage machinery, which I sometimes exhibit at steam rallies, and that's when I use a tent. Like you, I enjoy a bit of comfort, so I have a tent large enough to comfortably stand up in, as I find getting dressed in a low tent is a nuisance. I'm sure trying to wriggle into a slightly damp pair of jeans in the morning is what has historically put a lot of people off camping!

I have a couple of folding tables (with zip up cloth 'cupboards' under them to keep my food away from stray dogs!) along one side of the 'living room', an inflatable double mattress in the bedroom, a huge Coleman sleeping bag that I can turn over in and spread out, a 5 gallon plastic jerry can with tap for water so I can have a wash and a shave, a huge coolbox for food and cold drinks, and a small folding flatscreen TV/DVD player (like a mini laptop) that I bought from Maplin several years ago, which I can run off 12v re-chargeable battery packs that I have for work. The TV aerial mounts on a pole attached to my trailer, so I'm sorted!

The TV then gets locked away in the car when not in use, so no-one can pinch it out of the tent. I also have a remote control re-chargable lantern so I can turn the light on in the tent if I'm walking back to it in the dark, and turn the light off again when I'm in bed! As others have said, camping can be very comfortable these days. :)
 
Last edited:

Black sheep

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2021
Messages
92
Location
Area 51
One of my other hobbies is collecting and restoring vintage machinery, which I sometimes exhibit at steam fairs, and that's when I use a tent. Like you, I enjoy a bit of comfort, so I have a tent large enough to comfortably stand up in, as I find getting dressed in a low tent is a nuisance. I'm sure trying to wriggle into a slightly damp pair of jeans in the morning is what has historically put a lot of people off camping!

I have a couple of folding tables (with zip up cloth 'cupboards' under them to keep my food away from stray dogs!) along one side of the 'living room', an inflatable double mattress in the bedroom, a huge Coleman sleeping bag that I can turn over in and spread out, a 5 gallon plastic jerry can with tap for water so I can have a wash and a shave, a huge coolbox for food and cold drinks, and a small folding flatscreen TV/DVD player (like a mini laptop) that I bought from Maplin several years ago, which I can run off 12v re-chargeable battery packs that I have for work. The TV aerial mounts on a pole attached to my trailer, so I'm sorted!

The TV then gets locked away in the car when not in use, so no-one can pinch it out of the tent. I also have a remote control re-chargable lantern so I can turn the light on in the tent if I'm walking back to it in the dark, and turn the light off again when I'm in bed! As others have said, camping can be very comfortable these days. :)
We’re off to Devon i a few weeks and this time I’ve upgraded the mattress to one of the tall big ones. Hope it ok! Sleeping bag is really just two quilts with a zip around them, can’t remember what make but we’ve had it for years and never felt the need to renew.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
46,455
One of my other hobbies is collecting and restoring vintage machinery, which I sometimes exhibit at steam fairs, and that's when I use a tent. Like you, I enjoy a bit of comfort, so I have a tent large enough to comfortably stand up in, as I find getting dressed in a low tent is a nuisance. I'm sure trying to wriggle into a slightly damp pair of jeans in the morning is what has historically put a lot of people off camping!

I have a couple of folding tables (with zip up cloth 'cupboards' under them to keep my food away from stray dogs!) along one side of the 'living room', an inflatable double mattress in the bedroom, a huge Coleman sleeping bag that I can turn over in and spread out, a 5 gallon plastic jerry can with tap for water so I can have a wash and a shave, a huge coolbox for food and cold drinks, and a small folding flatscreen TV/DVD player (like a mini laptop) that I bought from Maplin several years ago, which I can run off 12v re-chargeable battery packs that I have for work. The TV aerial mounts on a pole attached to my trailer, so I'm sorted!

The TV then gets locked away in the car when not in use, so no-one can pinch it out of the tent. I also have a remote control re-chargable lantern so I can turn the light on in the tent if I'm walking back to it in the dark, and turn the light off again when I'm in bed! As others have said, camping can be very comfortable these days. :)

This is not camping, it's just turning your living room inside out :)
 

anzac

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Messages
2,181
Location
Terra Firma
One of my other hobbies is collecting and restoring vintage machinery, which I sometimes exhibit at steam fairs, and that's when I use a tent. Like you, I enjoy a bit of comfort, so I have a tent large enough to comfortably stand up in, as I find getting dressed in a low tent is a nuisance. I'm sure trying to wriggle into a slightly damp pair of jeans in the morning is what has historically put a lot of people off camping!

I have a couple of folding tables (with zip up cloth 'cupboards' under them to keep my food away from stray dogs!) along one side of the 'living room', an inflatable double mattress in the bedroom, a huge Coleman sleeping bag that I can turn over in and spread out, a 5 gallon plastic jerry can with tap for water so I can have a wash and a shave, a huge coolbox for food and cold drinks, and a small folding flatscreen TV/DVD player (like a mini laptop) that I bought from Maplin several years ago, which I can run off 12v re-chargeable battery packs that I have for work. The TV aerial mounts on a pole attached to my trailer, so I'm sorted!

The TV then gets locked away in the car when not in use, so no-one can pinch it out of the tent. I also have a remote control re-chargable lantern so I can turn the light on in the tent if I'm walking back to it in the dark, and turn the light off again when I'm in bed! As others have said, camping can be very comfortable these days. :)
No one ever said camping had to be 'roughing it'. With few exceptions, none of us are likely to be going that far away from the car park that we have to carry everything on our backs line squaddies going bush for a week, so 'comfort' is the word of the day.
 
Top