Can you cast a full length of 30 yard WF fly line?

Ability to cast a full 30 yard fly line off the reel. Normal single handed rod and WF fly line

  • Easy, no problem

    Votes: 20 22.2%
  • Occasionally, with a following wind behind me.

    Votes: 14 15.6%
  • Get close, but usually few coils left on the reel

    Votes: 15 16.7%
  • No chance

    Votes: 33 36.7%
  • Never tried

    Votes: 8 8.9%

  • Total voters
    90

Elwyman

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So while we're currently on the distraction topic.... I reckon there are 5 hobbies within fly fishing
  1. fishing
  2. casting
  3. tying
  4. buying
  5. collecting
I'm trying not to be interested in 4 and 5, I'm moderately interested in 3, very interested in 1 and getting more interested in 2. Being a better caster helps with 1 enormously of course and while it's just not important to cast tournament distances for fishing the skill involved in being able to do it must help everything else. I'll be happy when I'm able to cast to the backing comfortably and fully master the spey. Getting there.
You missed one......talking about it on forums!
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Casting (fly and threadline) would make no more a dubious 'sport' at the Olympics than:

Synchronised swimming
Rhythmic gymnastics
Beach volleyball
Surfing
Skateboarding
Dressage (the horse is doing all the heavy lifting there! 🤪)
Rock-climbing

et al...
 

aenoon

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Aye, fair enough, if you are accepting it is just a training exercise, rather than a facsimile of the real thing.
As James has already pointed out, his practise, and indeed need to cast distance, goes hand in hand with the fishing he does, ergo is a facsimile of the real thing. There are many aspects of fly fishing that do require the ability to send it over the standard 20 yards.
Sure is good to be sat in a boat dry fly casting at rising fish no more than 15 yds out, but a few guys need to drop it on a hat 25 yds plus for the type of fly fishing they do.
 

Elwyman

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As James has already pointed out, his practise, and indeed need to cast distance, goes hand in hand with the fishing he does, ergo is a facsimile of the real thing. There are many aspects of fly fishing that do require the ability to send it over the standard 20 yards.
Sure is good to be sat in a boat dry fly casting at rising fish no more than 15 yds out, but a few guys need to drop it on a hat 25 yds plus for the type of fly fishing they do.
I suppose bonefishing is the classic example of being able to cast quickly and accurately at distance.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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As James has already pointed out, his practise, and indeed need to cast distance, goes hand in hand with the fishing he does, ergo is a facsimile of the real thing. There are many aspects of fly fishing that do require the ability to send it over the standard 20 yards.
Sure is good to be sat in a boat dry fly casting at rising fish no more than 15 yds out, but a few guys need to drop it on a hat 25 yds plus for the type of fly fishing they do.

You have quoted me out of context there. Is the fish ever a fixed distance from the angler? Is a ring on the ground ever a good copy of where an angler is trying to place his fly after a fish has risen, moving in a particular direction, or has been spotted moving below surface?

Anyhoo, I did my level blummin' best to make it clear I had my tongue firmly in my cheek. Should have known it wouldn't cut any mustard with this place! :rolleyes:
 
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loxie

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I would love to practice casting but I always find something better to do. I do have unlimited fishing opportunities, quite literally on my doorstep so I'm short of excuses!

I do most of my single handed fishing on small rivers for salmon and sea trout. I do a bit of dry fly and nymph fishing for wild fish on rivers and lakes and very occasional Loch style. Long casting doesn't feature at all in anything I do but I quite like the idea of of getting better, just for the sake of it.
 

wrongfoot

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I don't know, I've never cast into my backing with a normal line. I might have been thereabouts with a shooting head, but that was set up with amnesia running line for shore fishing for Bass. Reckon I've hit 40+m with that.
 

ohanzee

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You have quoted me out of context there. Is the fish ever a fixed distance from the angler? Is a ring on the ground ever a good copy of where an angler is trying to place his fly after a fish has risen, moving in a particular direction, or has been spotted moving below surface?

Anyhoo, I did my level blummin' best to make it clear I had my tongue firmly in my cheek. Should have known it wouldn't cut any mustard with this place! :rolleyes:

If you learn to put a fly in a ring, at various distances, and you get more accurate doing that, I'd find it hard to argue that is not the same skills required to land a fly where you think the fish is whatever the distance.

We could get you a chair and place an outboard awkwardly for realism:)
 

boisker

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Like most things it’s just down to practice... I’ve been practicing short stuff and curve casts with an 8’4” rod recently so hadn’t tried going longer for a while
having watched the thread the last day or so I popped out this morning with 9’5w... mastery trout line
pick up and lay down at 70’... variable- with a short single haul into the backcast then real easy, with no haul at all it was a bit hit and miss.... 50:50 at a guess, as expected if the pick up into the backcast was good then the forward cast was easy.... if the backcast isn’t on the money then the forward cast sucked:)
no reason why Alan couldn’t hit the ‘target’ most of the time if it is something he has practiced.... I think James vid ably demonstrates that...
casting to the backing.... yeah fine, but I had a period where I practiced it a fair bit.... I maxed out (not today... when I was practicing distance more often) at 108’.... to get further would have taken a lot more practice...
i’d need to tighten up my stroke and haul a lot more if I wanted to push on further....

I got into putting some time into longer distances, not for fishing at that distance but (as referred to in other posts) to improve my technique.... I’d had enough of struggling to make an accurate 45’ cast when the wind was howling.... which suddenly becomes easy when you can cast twice that distance....
each to their own, but I just enjoying fishing more as my technique gets better....
I would practice distance more often but it puts too much pressure on my wrist if I spend too long on it... downs side of slight hand arm vibration...:sneaky:
 

Cap'n Fishy

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If you learn to put a fly in a ring, at various distances, and you get more accurate doing that, I'd find it hard to argue that is not the same skills required to land a fly where you think the fish is whatever the distance.

Well, you say that, but it is the difference between aiming at a static, objective target and aiming at a moving, subjective target. And you have the factor of what direction the fish is going in between the rise you saw and the spot you choose to put your fly... and the distance between rise and placement. How do you read where the fish was heading and how far its next rise is going to be? No ring on the water is going to replicate that.

Anyhoo, like I said, tongue was in cheek. Just giving the tournament organisers something to take on board... 🤪
 

aenoon

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Well, you say that, but it is the difference between aiming at a static, objective target and aiming at a moving, subjective target. And you have the factor of what direction the fish is going in between the rise you saw and the spot you choose to put your fly... and the distance between rise and placement. How do you read where the fish was heading and how far its next rise is going to be? No ring on the water is going to replicate that.

Anyhoo, like I said, tongue was in cheek. Just giving the tournament organisers something to take on board... 🤪
Surely taking all that into consideration, you still have to put the fly in the area you decide it should be? Said area is a static point, ring on water or otherwise. 30 yds or otherwise.
 

ohanzee

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Well, you say that, but it is the difference between aiming at a static, objective target and aiming at a moving, subjective target. And you have the factor of what direction the fish is going in between the rise you saw and the spot you choose to put your fly... and the distance between rise and placement. How do you read where the fish was heading and how far its next rise is going to be? No ring on the water is going to replicate that.

Anyhoo, like I said, tongue was in cheek. Just giving the tournament organisers something to take on board... 🤪

When you pick a target to cast a fly to, after carefully guessing where in front of it might be, you are aiming at a fixed point, the important bit, if you guess right, is landing it accurately, so much so that not landing it accurately means it doesn't matter a whole lot how good you are at guessing where the fish is if you can't put it there :)

Bert got there before me.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Surely taking all that into consideration, you still have to put the fly in the area you decide it should be? Said area is a static point, ring on water or otherwise. 30 yds or otherwise.

A ring on the water is a visible, fixed, static target that the casters can aim at. And all casters have the same fixed target. Whoever hits it best is the winner.

If you present the caster with the CGI of a fish rising, he has to judge where the fish is heading and where it is going to rise next. He then has to aim at an unmarked area and hope for the best - exactly what happens in real life.

The CGI technology would decide who made the best judgment of where to put the fly.

You know... just an idea... 🤪
 

Cap'n Fishy

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When you pick a target to cast a fly to, after carefully guessing where in front of it might be, you are aiming at a fixed point, the important bit, if you guess right, is landing it accurately, so much so that not landing it accurately means it doesn't matter a whole lot how good you are at guessing where the fish is if you can't put it there :)

Struggling to make sense of that...

Bert got there before me.

Ah good - see my reply to Bert.
 

aenoon

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A ring on the water is a visible, fixed, static target that the casters can aim at. And all casters have the same fixed target. Whoever hits it best is the winner.

If you present the caster with the CGI of a fish rising, he has to judge where the fish is heading and where it is going to rise next. He then has to aim at an unmarked area and hope for the best - exactly what happens in real life.

The CGI technology would decide who made the best judgment of where to put the fly.

You know... just an idea... 🤪
Fine. But even after all that thought, the caster still has to cast to a fixed point, unmarked or otherwise, does he/she not? at whatever distance.
In real life, is often "blind" casting, no obvious rises, or areas to cover, but cast is still made towards a fixed point is it not?
 

ohanzee

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If you had 2 ropes tied to the ring and 2 people pulling the ring about randomly in all directions you would be able to simulate the movement of the fish, you then shout 'STOP!' when you have guessed where they are going to pull it next, move the ring to that spot and you have simulated the decision you make before you cast, then you cast into it, at that fixed distance as you would when fishing.

Alternately just cast to the rings knowing that like in fishing you didn't have any choice over where the rings are.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Fine. But even after all that thought, the caster still has to cast to a fixed point, unmarked or otherwise, does he/she not? at whatever distance.
In real life, is often "blind" casting, no obvious rises, or areas to cover, but cast is still made towards a fixed point is it not?

No.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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If you had 2 ropes tied to the ring and 2 people pulling the ring about randomly in all directions you would be able to simulate the movement of the fish, you then shout 'STOP!' when you have guessed where they are going to pull it next...

Like you would shout STOP! to the trout and then cast to where it had stopped? :unsure:
 

ohanzee

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Like you would shout STOP! to the trout and then cast to where it had stopped? :unsure:

When fishing I have to decide on a spot, I guess, or predict based on the last two rises, then it's a fixed point, it's no longer a moving target and once committed it's a fixed distance.

I then have to judge the distance and cast straight to be accurate.

So you got a fixed distance, judgement of distance, and straight tracking...
 
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