Can you cast a full length of 30 yard WF fly line?

Ability to cast a full 30 yard fly line off the reel. Normal single handed rod and WF fly line

  • Easy, no problem

    Votes: 20 22.2%
  • Occasionally, with a following wind behind me.

    Votes: 14 15.6%
  • Get close, but usually few coils left on the reel

    Votes: 15 16.7%
  • No chance

    Votes: 33 36.7%
  • Never tried

    Votes: 8 8.9%

  • Total voters
    90

Cap'n Fishy

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The basic question is wrong. It is not "can you...........?" but should be "do you need to.......? In most cases the answer is "No"

The basic question is not wrong. A question is a question. The OP has asked one question. 'Do you need to?', is a completely different question to whether one can or can't cast 30 yards.

If you can't cast 30 yards, then the question 'do you need to?' takes on a different significance. If you can't and you don't need to, then there is no problem. If you can't and you do need to (for whatever reason), then you have work to do. 😜
 

James9118

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People who advocate long casting need to ask themselves what they are hoping to achieve. If it is just casting a long way because they can, then best go to the park. Otherwise, consider where the fish are most likely to be that they are aiming to catch and ask themselves whether or not casting 20 yards past the fish is really a useful tactic.
I think you're missing the main point. I've learnt to cast 30+ yds in order to be able to make a 60-70ft cast in the sometimes extreme conditions I face when fishing.

When you're targeting individual fish you don't get the opportunity to walk round to a more favourable casting position - you have to take the shot from where you are. In a saltwater environment the casts into the wind vastly outnumber those with the wind on your back.

Like I've mentioned previously, I strongly suspect in the conditions I mention above the 'average' caster wouldn't get anywhere near the fish. They might kid themselves that their 75ft best cast is good in all conditions but they're wrong, the reason they can 'only' get 75ft is because their casting contains gross errors, and the wind will emphasise this. (Again, I'll re-iterate what I've said a couple of times above: if your casting is good enough for the fishing you do, then that's all that counts).

There is also a massive misconception about what constitutes distance practice - I practice tracking (with targets back and front). I practice minimum power casts. I practice shaping my loops. I practice carry. What I don't do is stand in a field trying to cast my best distance against a tape.

James
 
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ohanzee

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There is also a massive misconception about what constitutes distance practice - I practice tracking (with targets back and front). I practice minimum power casts. I practice shaping my loops. I practice carry. What I don't do is stand in a field trying to cast my best distance against a tape.

I think this is an important point for those that might want to, need to, or just fancy trying, maybe the most useful advice in the thread, I admit to a time when I thought I could get by without it...

Most will recognise the scenario...my first 'this will get me past 70' rod was a Sage XP, straight to an old tennis court that had a grass strip along the side, and tried to cast further than my previous old Greys rod, marked it with sticks, did that about 3 times a week for a good half hour each time, started to see an improvement in terms of...inches, with a light breeze in the right direction I could get a few feet more, progress was very slow.
I did the same thing for weeks, exactly the same thing :D I repeated a dysfunctional effort to cast my furthest over and over and over again, no idea how to, just tried, and after a few weeks gaining maybe 2' I gave up and asked an instructor, fixed some shocking fundamental errors and broke it down to what I was actually trying to get the line to do, and within a few days I was analysing and recognising what I was doing wrong rather than just blindly trying.

I know I'm not alone there, so its worth repeating - tracking, min power, loop shape, carry are individual skills that need to be developed.
 
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karlsson

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The basic question is wrong. It is not "can you...........?" but should be "do you need to.......? In most cases the answer is "No"

For example, where I fish on the river a 30 yard cast will land the fly 10 yards into the field on the far side, so do I need to cast that far? No, I do not. Do I need to be able on occasion to cast 20 yards very accurately to target a rising trout tucked close to the reeds on the far bank? The answer is "yes." Can I do that? Again, the answer is "yes".

On the reservoir I fish from the bank, well over 40 years experience there has taught me that the prime fish catching zone is from 5-15 yards out, with 10 yards being the most likely. At that point the water is about 10' deep at normal high water and the trout patrol back & forth along that line. Therefore my casting effort is aimed at getting my flies into that zone as often, and for as long as possible. Do I need to cast 30 yards to be able to do that? No, I don't but I do need to cast 23-25 yards consistently so that the flies are down at the right depth when they get into the zone.

Casting 30 yards is a waste of time there until the winter when the fish retreat from the bank and feed down at the 30' level. For every fish I catch at range, I catch 4 or 5 close in. Long casting, therefore, is a waste of productive fishing time.

People who advocate long casting need to ask themselves what they are hoping to achieve. If it is just casting a long way because they can, then best go to the park. Otherwise, consider where the fish are most likely to be that they are aiming to catch and ask themselves whether or not casting 20 yards past the fish is really a useful tactic.
Tell me you can't throw 100 feet easily, without you telling me you can't throw 100 feet easily 🤣

Cheers
Lasse
 

original cormorant

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Where is the element of randomness?

Where is the element of predicting the cadence of the fish, to put the fly in its path at a carefully judged distance, rather than smack-bang on its head (in the hoop)? (And in judging the timing of the rise.)

Where is the element of having to cast 20 times at under 5 yards, followed by once at 20 yards, leading to the line either twisting or needing to be stripped off the reel before the fish is too far to be worth trying for?

Just floating it out there... :whistle:
It's called Whac-a-mole
 

LukeNZ

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My casting abilities were formed by not being able to go fishing as a youngster - relying in others to take me, or waiting for holidays.

All the days and weeks of waiting got filled in with casting on a bit of wasteland over the road from our council house. Aiming at all manner of rubbish that was littering the place - reaching out to hit somebodys dropped fish and chip paper ball, or bending around an old truck tyre to hit a Walkers chip packet..

....endless mindless hours of grooving muscle memory, building tendon and muscle fitness, while dreaming of going fishing...

Nothing is really wasted, in hindsight.

🙃
 

Elwyman

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My casting abilities were formed by not being able to go fishing as a youngster - relying in others to take me, or waiting for holidays.

All the days and weeks of waiting got filled in with casting on a bit of wasteland over the road from our council house. Aiming at all manner of rubbish that was littering the place - reaching out to hit somebodys dropped fish and chip paper ball, or bending around an old truck tyre to hit a Walkers chip packet..

....endless mindless hours of grooving muscle memory, building tendon and muscle fitness, while dreaming of going fishing...

Nothing is really wasted, in hindsight.

🙃
Ronaldo and Messi would agree!
 

Tangled

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Found this - again...

 

original cormorant

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I've been casting but not fishing my #8 bonefish outfits. I have 2 #8 rods and three lines and the lines are marked at 50ft, so it's not difficult to gauge distance from how far the mark is outside the rod.
I was trying to find out which rod matched which line best. I discovered that one rod seems to feel particularly good with one of the lines but there was actually no significant difference in how far each rod cast.

One of the lines is bang on the affta #8 210 grain specification and I can't consistently cast this line much over 70ft with either rod - I can scrape 80ft, but not consistently and for fishing it needs to be consistent.

The other two lines are #7 and #8 versions of the same TriangleTaper line with a short head of only 23ft that are actually #9 and #9.5 (ie in the gap between 9 and 10). Both of the these lines cast consistently over 80ft, but the tip of the heavier line tends to collapse at the end of the cast (ie tip hits the water and is overtaken by the belly) - what am I doing wrong?

In the next few days I'm planning to try the heavier of the TT lines on a #9 rod.
 

LukeNZ

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Perhaps try aiming higher up on release (shoot).
Is often the case angler casts at surface, or ground level, on shoot, rather than higher up on horizon, this can cause the problem you mention.

P.S. A minor haul as line straightens out can help turn over tip, too.
..and a definite stop, in the forward release stroke with its resulting rebound adds line speed, and aids tip turnover.

Line-speed is key to distance, proper turnover, and tippet straightening.

🙃
 

original cormorant

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I'm not convinced.
With a 30ft head and 210 grain line turnover is good.
With a 23ft head and 242 grain line turnover is good.
With a 23ft head and 267 grain line leader and tip land but line behind tip is still travelling ie the tip is travelling more slowly than the line behind it.

There is obviously a "fault" that only becomes apparent with the heavier line. I must go and play some more. The haul as the line straightens might work.
 

JoeOh

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Does it still count as a 30 yard cast if 3 yards are still in the rod rings, or does the backing knot have to hit the top ring to qualify
 

uptomyknee_s

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I would consider myself a moderate caster, I do enough to get by.
Recently I decided I wanted an 8# rod mainly for Boobies at depth.
Having bought an 8# I then set about trying to cast an Airflo Di8 Booby Basher line.
55ft head & 400 grains. Even cutting the head down to where it loads my rod it is not easy to master. An appointment with an instructor is my next port of call if I continue to struggle.
 

karlsson

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Does it still count as a 30 yard cast if 3 yards are still in the rod rings, or does the backing knot have to hit the top ring to qualify
I'd say feet to fly should be 30 yards, if you need 45 yards out to get that, so be it. Amount of line cast is never the distance your fly lands 😉

Cheers
Lasse
 

karlsson

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I'm not convinced.
With a 30ft head and 210 grain line turnover is good.
With a 23ft head and 242 grain line turnover is good.
With a 23ft head and 267 grain line leader and tip land but line behind tip is still travelling ie the tip is travelling more slowly than the line behind it.

There is obviously a "fault" that only becomes apparent with the heavier line. I must go and play some more. The haul as the line straightens might work.
1,6 grams difference doesn't make that difference.
And unless you hit the ground or hook yourself, the part of the line behind the tip won't be travelling faster. So I suggest you have abother look, most likely, the "fault" is there all along, but gets more pronounced with the slightly heavier line.
And those TT skagit lines are quite hard to cast for distance, a gentle backcast, good amoubt if drift as they tend to kick, and a very controlled delivery wity a early release so not to waste any flyleg shooting travel. Holding on too long means there's alot of momentum in the unrolled line, flying spaghetti will be on the menu 🙂

Cheers
Lasse
 
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