Can you cast a full length of 30 yard WF fly line?

Ability to cast a full 30 yard fly line off the reel. Normal single handed rod and WF fly line

  • Easy, no problem

    Votes: 20 21.7%
  • Occasionally, with a following wind behind me.

    Votes: 15 16.3%
  • Get close, but usually few coils left on the reel

    Votes: 16 17.4%
  • No chance

    Votes: 33 35.9%
  • Never tried

    Votes: 8 8.7%

  • Total voters
    92

Cap'n Fishy

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Just my tuppenceworth... to be taken with a large pinch of salt...

I admire all the guys who can cast a 'tournament' length line. But is it a game like golf or tennis in its own right, or is it part of the sport of fly fishing? :unsure:

And all this fixed distance stuff? What in real fishing ever happens at a fixed distance?

If it is part of fly fishing, and being a boat fisher and largely a dry fly fisher, the LRC (long range cover) is one of the most satisfying things to pull off, requiring both distance and accuracy. But in a practical situation, you can rarely achieve it at more than 15-20 yards, if even that, because if you sit with 20 yards of line off your reel (in readiness of a LRC), casting 5 to 10 yards regularly, the spare line gradually develops twists, so when you do go for a LRC, a bunch of knitting hits the butt ring. 😜

Meanwhile, the meat and drink fishing is being able to cast accurately to fish anywhere from under the rod tip, to 10 yards or so out. The shorter you keep it all, the closer the fish rise to the boat, as you are not disturbing the water with long blind casts at nothing, casting over the heads of fish nearer the boat, and scaring them off. The best non-targeting cast is no cast at all. Zero feet! Wait till a fish rises at a nice range to cover. Five yards or so is perfect.

This is where the competition casters could do with a better test of their skills, methinks! 😜 I'm just thinking out loud here, like, but how's this for an idea?... 😜 In a practical situation, you need to be able to cast and retrieve many times at short range, and then immediately cast to a long range rise. And any one cast can be of any length, depending on where a fish rose. And where you cast to does not want to be the exact spot the fish rose. You need to put your fly in front of the fish, not on it. And how much lead to give it depends on the cadence of the fish, if it came up more than once. It might rise a foot from its first, or 3 feet or 5 yards...

So, cut to the competition casting arena...

The arena is one of them pixelated floors like what they have on 'Strictly Come Dancing' (if that is real?), so they can project images onto it. The floor shows the surface of the water... The competitor stands on his mark. A video of a rise is projected on to the floor, anywhere between under yer man's feet, to 10 yards distant. It contains enough information for the caster to work out where it will next rise. The caster has then to cast whatever tournament casters attach to the end of their leader to where he predicts the fish will next rise. Where his thingy lands will be scored according to where the CGI predicted it would next rise. And of course if he was late in getting there, marks would be deducted. 😉

If you were able to create a big enough floor to throw in the occasional 20 yard rise (requiring frantic stripping of line from reel to reach it within the time limit), that would be fabulous! (y)

Sorry... carry on... (y)
 

PaulD

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. . . I can do a full fly line on grass (with still conditions) with a 3 or 5wt, but have vary rarely gone anywhere near that on water. I never see the need for distance casting, . . .
Just my way of pleasure flyfishing, nothing to prove.

There's the nub, for your way of fishing you never see the need.

For others, those whose pleasure fishing is to target differing populations of fish, maybe on bigger waters, maybe needing to fish at depth, keeping the 'fly' at depth over longer distances, casting a long line is a fundamental requirement.
 

Scotty Mitchell

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In my younger years I just had to be able to cast the full fly line, no other reason than to just be able to do it.
As you do with such things when you are young, like how long can you keep a wheelie going on your bike type thing.
Eventually I could, and it’s a bit like riding a bike.
I don’t get why some people are so surprised that plenty people can do it.
 

Tangled

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Dec 28, 2015
Messages
7,153
So while we're currently on the distraction topic.... I reckon there are 5 hobbies within fly fishing
  1. fishing
  2. casting
  3. tying
  4. buying
  5. collecting
I'm trying not to be interested in 4 and 5, I'm moderately interested in 3, very interested in 1 and getting more interested in 2. Being a better caster helps with 1 enormously of course and while it's just not important to cast tournament distances for fishing the skill involved in being able to do it must help everything else. I'll be happy when I'm able to cast to the backing comfortably and fully master the spey. Getting there.
 
Last edited:

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
47,795
Just my tuppenceworth... to be taken with a large pinch of salt...

I admire all the guys who can cast a 'tournament' length line. But is it a game like golf or tennis in its own right, or is it part of the sport of fly fishing? :unsure:

And all this fixed distance stuff? What in real fishing ever happens at a fixed distance?

If it is part of fly fishing, and being a boat fisher and largely a dry fly fisher, the LRC (long range cover) is one of the most satisfying things to pull off, requiring both distance and accuracy. But in a practical situation, you can rarely achieve it at more than 15-20 yards, if even that, because if you sit with 20 yards of line off your reel (in readiness of a LRC), casting 5 to 10 yards regularly, the spare line gradually develops twists, so when you do go for a LRC, a bunch of knitting hits the butt ring. 😜

Meanwhile, the meat and drink fishing is being able to cast accurately to fish anywhere from under the rod tip, to 10 yards or so out. The shorter you keep it all, the closer the fish rise to the boat, as you are not disturbing the water with long blind casts at nothing, casting over the heads of fish nearer the boat, and scaring them off. The best non-targeting cast is no cast at all. Zero feet! Wait till a fish rises at a nice range to cover. Five yards or so is perfect.

This is where the competition casters could do with a better test of their skills, methinks! 😜 I'm just thinking out loud here, like, but how's this for an idea?... 😜 In a practical situation, you need to be able to cast and retrieve many times at short range, and then immediately cast to a long range rise. And any one cast can be of any length, depending on where a fish rose. And where you cast to does not want to be the exact spot the fish rose. You need to put your fly in front of the fish, not on it. And how much lead to give it depends on the cadence of the fish, if it came up more than once. It might rise a foot from its first, or 3 feet or 5 yards...

So, cut to the competition casting arena...

The arena is one of them pixelated floors like what they have on 'Strictly Come Dancing' (if that is real?), so they can project images onto it. The floor shows the surface of the water... The competitor stands on his mark. A video of a rise is projected on to the floor, anywhere between under yer man's feet, to 10 yards distant. It contains enough information for the caster to work out where it will next rise. The caster has then to cast whatever tournament casters attach to the end of their leader to where he predicts the fish will next rise. Where his thingy lands will be scored according to where the CGI predicted it would next rise. And of course if he was late in getting there, marks would be deducted. 😉

If you were able to create a big enough floor to throw in the occasional 20 yard rise (requiring frantic stripping of line from reel to reach it within the time limit), that would be fabulous! (y)

Sorry... carry on... (y)

Sounds not too far from accuracy comps - you have hoops on the water at different distances, spread at different angles, you have to put the fly in each hoop against the clock adjusting the length of line as you go.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Sounds not too far from accuracy comps - you have hoops on the water at different distances, spread at different angles, you have to put the fly in each hoop against the clock adjusting the length of line as you go.

Where is the element of randomness?

Where is the element of predicting the cadence of the fish, to put the fly in its path at a carefully judged distance, rather than smack-bang on its head (in the hoop)? (And in judging the timing of the rise.)

Where is the element of having to cast 20 times at under 5 yards, followed by once at 20 yards, leading to the line either twisting or needing to be stripped off the reel before the fish is too far to be worth trying for?

Just floating it out there... :whistle:
 
Last edited:

James9118

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As I responded to Whinging Pom earlier in the thread - as long as someone's casting is good enough for them to enjoy the fishing they do, then that's all that matters. However, they shouldn't make assumptions about other's sport.

I practice and get lessons for my casting because currently it isn't good enough for some of the fishing I do, I hope that one day I will get better. It seems I'm one of the few that will admit that. I know that in certain conditions I struggle to make that accurate 70ft cast as filmed. However, when I'm giving it everything I know to put my fly in front of a bonefish into a 25mph+ wind etc., I also know that the vast majority of fly anglers wouldn't even attempt it, and there's a good likelihood that many wouldn't even manage to get the fly in front of them, never mind the fish, in similar conditions.

So if your fishing offers unchallenging casting you should be happy, it's not the same for all of us though.

James.
 
Last edited:

ohanzee

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47,795
Where is the element of randomness?

Where is the element of predicting the cadence of the fish, to put the fly in its path at a carefully judged distance, rather than smack-bang its head (in the hoop)? (And in judging the timing of the rise.)

Where is the element of having to cast 20 times at under 5 yards, followed by once at 20 yards, leading to the line either twisting or needing to be stripped off the reel before the fish is too far to be worth trying for?

Just floating it out there... :whistle:

You would have to try it to see, it is hard and tests your ability to judge distances and readapt to others accurately and quickly, it develops some of the skills you suggested, some of the elements of random real fishing are missing as with distance casting but it's about building a skill for rather than being the same, in the same way that cyclists train on a stationary bike, training is just an efficient way of preparing you to have a head start in the real thing.
 

PaulD

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In my younger years I just had to be able to cast the full fly line, no other reason than to just be able to do it.
As you do with such things when you are young, like how long can you keep a wheelie going on your bike type thing.
Eventually I could, and it’s a bit like riding a bike.
I don’t get why some people are so surprised that plenty people can do it.

"In my younger years . . .", yep! In the 80s, I loved the deep fishing from a drifting boat and wielded the 10ft AFTM 9 to 11s and 11s to 13s with enthusiasm and vigour. I was in my thirties.

Tomorrow I'm out in my float tube and I'll have with me a 9ft, 6wt, 10ft, 5wt and an 8' 10", 3wt. Things are different when you're approaching 70!
 

Scotty Mitchell

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"In my younger years . . .", yep! In the 80s, I loved the deep fishing from a drifting boat and wielded the 10ft AFTM 9 to 11s and 11s to 13s with enthusiasm and vigour. I was in my thirties.

Tomorrow I'm out in my float tube and I'll have with me a 9ft, 6wt, 10ft, 5wt and an 8' 10", 3wt. Things are different when you're approaching 70!
Similar story to myself but I’m not quite 70 yet 😃
I was brought up fishing mainly from boats, all #6’s and #7’s.
A mate and I were quite competitive in getting to the “full line” status 😃.
A back injury leaves me ,since 2008, unable to fish sitting down, so I bank fish with #5’s.
I can still punt out a full Snowbee XS if I want to with my #5 set up.
I can’t recall needing to though, but every now and then I do it, and find it quite satisfying 👍
 

ed_t

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Where is the element of randomness?

Where is the element of predicting the cadence of the fish, to put the fly in its path at a carefully judged distance, rather than smack-bang its head (in the hoop)? (And in judging the timing of the rise.)

Where is the element of having to cast 20 times at under 5 yards, followed by once at 20 yards, leading to the line either twisting or needing to be stripped off the reel before the fish is too far to be worth trying for?

Just floating it out there... :whistle:
How much bank fishing do you do?
 

Cap'n Fishy

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You would have to try it to see, it is hard and tests your ability to judge distances and readapt to others accurately and quickly, it develops some of the skills you suggested, some of the elements of random real fishing are missing as with distance casting but it's about building a skill for rather than being the same, in the same way that cyclists train on a stationary bike, training is just an efficient way of preparing you to have a head start in the real thing.

Aye, fair enough, if you are accepting it is just a training exercise, rather than a facsimile of the real thing.
 

Whinging pom

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As I responded to Whinging Pom earlier in the thread - as long as someone's casting is good enough for them to enjoy the fishing they do, then that's all that matters. However, they shouldn't make assumptions about other's sport.

I practice and get lessons for my casting because currently it isn't good enough for some of the fishing I do, I hope that one day I will get better. It seems I'm one of the few that will admit that. I know that in certain conditions I struggle to make that accurate 70ft cast as filmed. However, when I'm giving it everything I know to put my fly in front of a bonefish into a 25mph+ wind etc., I also know that the vast majority of fly anglers wouldn't even attempt it, and there's a good likelihood that many wouldn't even manage to get the fly in front of them, never mind the fish, in similar conditions.

So if your fishing offers unchallenging casting you should be happy, it's not the same for all of us though.

James.
James I for one totally get that . practice and grooving the stroke is everything and it’s reassuring that you say you not just practice but get lessons too . And really it would be wonderful to have some one watch over mine once in a while and
Re-tune it ( or giving it a major overhaul ).

Maybe I should book another lesson with Robin. When I first turned up I had a 9’ split cane I’d bought from a junk shop I think he enjoyed the challenge. this time he’ll have a 6’ 2wt to deal with😁

Thankyou I’m feeling inspired !!
 
D

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[QUOTE="Tangled, post: 2893034, member:
  1. fishing
  2. casting
  3. tying
  4. buying
  5. collecting
[/QUOTE]
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There must be more than this.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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As I responded to Whinging Pom earlier in the thread - as long as someone's casting is good enough for them to enjoy the fishing they do, then that's all that matters. However, they shouldn't make assumptions about other's sport.

I practice and get lessons for my casting because currently it isn't good enough for some of the fishing I do, I hope that one day I will get better. It seems I'm one of the few that will admit that. I know that in certain conditions I struggle to make that accurate 70ft cast as filmed. However, when I'm giving it everything I know to put my fly in front of a bonefish into a 25mph+ wind etc., I also know that the vast majority of fly anglers wouldn't even attempt it, and there's a good likelihood that many wouldn't even manage to get the fly in front of them, never mind the fish, in similar conditions.

So if your fishing offers unchallenging casting you should be happy, it's not the same for all of us though.

James.

For sure, James. I accept everything you say. And you are a lucky guy to be covering bonefish at 25 yards. I dream of being there, trying to do that. However, just because my fishing consists of casting 5 yards, rather than 25 yards, does not make it unchallenging. It is very challenging. A lot of the folk I know can't put the fly where it needs to be to get the fish that rose 5 yards away to take it. A lot of the time I fail to do it myself! That is not unchallenging! 😜

Cheers,
Col
 

Scotty Mitchell

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For sure, James. I accept everything you say. And you are a lucky guy to be covering bonefish at 25 yards. I dream of being there, trying to do that. However, just because my fishing consists of casting 5 yards, rather than 25 yards, does not make it unchallenging. It is very challenging. A lot of the folk I know can't put the fly where it needs to be to get the fish that rose 5 yards away to take it. A lot of the time I fail to do it myself! That is not unchallenging! 😜

Cheers,
Col
It often find my very short range covers can land heavily, more often than mid and long range when I think about it. I forget to slow the line down between my thumb and finger, then try and do it all at once, and it’s like someone has thrown a paving slab in. 🙁
 

Tangled

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I'll accept rod building and grudgingly a highly edited form of entomology. Not convinced of the rest. Maybe add travel.
 

Whinging pom

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Entomology
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I'll accept rod building and grudgingly a highly edited form of entomology. Not convinced of the rest. Maybe add travel.
[/QUOTE]
Ecology
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And why’s the entomology highly edited? I bet we have a load of members that do kick samples for the river fly partnership
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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I would love to be a better caster. My first 20 or so years of being a boat wet fly puller, able to chuck out a decent enough line for the job (about 25-30 yards, when hoofing it) meant I never had any tuition. In more recent times I have become a dry fly fisher, and my shortcomings have come to the fore. Forty five years of being a left-hander with his arm over the engine has given me the same 45 degree, windmilling action seen in most left-handed boat fishers...

(None of these are me...)

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Not only does that make it more difficult to accurately cover a rise at any range, close or distant, but as I get older, my rotator cuff is giving me problems. Been to physio for it in 2019 and again this year, and struggling to get through a day's pulling with heavier, longer gear. I really should get myself some tuition in the hope that it can teach an old dog new tricks before it it too late. Meanwhile, my physio exercises seem to be helping...

Col
 
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