Canadian pondweed and Curly leaf removal

johhwu

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Mar 17, 2015
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Currently working at a fishery that is having a big problem with Canadian pondweed and Curly leaf pondweed, it is growing at a rapid rate due to the clarity of the water. I have been manually removing the weed with a cutter and a rake, but it is a very large job when it is only me on the lake (I occasionally have help but it seems to be a losing battle). Any suggestions on other ways to tackle this? Ive looked into getting someone in but the machine only cuts to 5ft deep, and it would grow back up in a matter of weeks. Also looked into herbicides but seems most like Diquat etc are banned in the UK.

Any suggestions would be helpful
 
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guest54

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Cutting Canadian pond weed invariably makes things worse as every stray piece that settles in shallow enough water will root. At other times of year it becomes brittle and then it spreads of it's own accord. The best method is grubbing out the roots early and late season, tough job.
 

johhwu

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Cutting Canadian pond weed invariably makes things worse as every stray piece that settles in shallow enough water will root. At other times of year it becomes brittle and then it spreads of it's own accord. The best method is grubbing out the roots early and late season, tough job.

We have been trying to get it from the roots. We made a rake from steel that basically trolls the bottom, but it is very very heavy, and when the weeds start to wrap it its near impossible to lift out (we drop in in and drag it back from the bank). So with the big V cutter we were also trolling, its the same sort of story, and as we are rowing with oars its a hard oul job lol. Just wish there was some herbicide that we could use, or some magical method, but from research it seems that just gotta pull it out by hand.
 
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guest54

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Fraid so. If there is vehicle access?, has anyone got a landrover, preferably with a winch to attach the rake chain to.
 

sewinbasher

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We have a 3 acre clear water pool with similar issues. We used to cut it which was done with mechanical weed cutters and easy enough but the real issue was dragging out and disposing of the cut weed which for an ageing membership was too demanding. We now use permitted chemical treatment, including most recently RoundUp, which are fairly effective but every time we find something that works it gets banned, and I think this now includes RoundUp. We're currently trying a dye that inhibits light and thus retards growth.

You shouldn't try to eradicate it as it has huge food harbouring qualities, just keep it 3 or 4 feet sub surface or clear patches.
 
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guest54

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We're currently trying a dye that inhibits light and thus retards growth.

I do hope you've had professional advice, these dyes can do the job but have the potential to cause massive algae die off with drastic effects of oxygen depletion.
 

johhwu

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You shouldn't try to eradicate it as it has huge food harbouring qualities, just keep it 3 or 4 feet sub surface or clear patches.[/QUOTE]

Yea don't want a bare basin, but its right up to the surface in some parts so it needs to be controlled to an extent, or it will end up unfishable.

There is vehicles access yes and I think ill try the winching idea thanks!
 

sewinbasher

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We're currently trying a dye that inhibits light and thus retards growth.

I do hope you've had professional advice, these dyes can do the job but have the potential to cause massive algae die off with drastic effects of oxygen depletion.
We're fortunate enough to have a former EA fisheries scientist in the club as advisor and have not suffered any unfortunate side effects. We have also been using a solar powered sonic "algae buster" to control the algal blooms for 5 or 6 years now.
 

Fishtales

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Black sheet polythene weighted down and covering the areas with the worst of the weed. After a while the weed will be dead from lack of light and the polythene can then be moved or removed. The cleared area could then be seeded with low growing native pond plants so that the pond weed will be slow in colonising the cleared area. The Potamogeton, I take it that is the curly leaf one, is a native but there are low growing plants that could take their place.
 

mgj

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We have a similar problem. I am making a decent heavy cutter that will keep close to the bottom, and I have a little two stroke winch.

This is a capstan which generates about 3000 lb/f of line pull. ie it will pull a Jimny with locked brakes if need be! It pulls in at a steady walk because it has a double worm reduction box. Weighs about 15 lbs. All you need is a spike for a ground anchor, or the towhook of a vehicle. Take the rope and cutter out in a dingy, drop the cutter and winch the whole lot back in - we are cutting 100 yards of pull at a time on a 5/8 dia polypropylene rope. I'm upgrading the cutter from a fairly light A frame cutter - rides up in thick weed, to a 60 pounder with a 2 metre wide cut.

Very effective. It is a little forestry winch powered by a chainsaw motor. Works a treat - though I need to improve the cutter from the lightweight Mk1 version.

At that speed of pull, one can use it to winch in the rope to trap the weed - polyprop rope floats.

Even pulls the dinghy out of the water at the end of the day! The beauty of the capstan of course is the the length of cut is only limited by the length of rope. Before the weed went mad we cut, testing, about 1/2 acre in 2 hours.
 
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