Cane rod reconditioning

easker1

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I'm sure there's a You tube video of the Girls at Hardys putting the rings on , worth a watch if you can find it,
easker1
 

Cooperman

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In reply to Badcaster I like the idea of using a quiver tip. My thread feed rod is simply a bit of plastic coated stiff wire I had around and the white plastic wheel rotates to feed the thread down to the rod, it is actually a fitting off some old conservatory blinds. Note I made this jig from bits and pieces I had around.
The coil spring provides the tension, note the odd nuts and washers on the left side bracket made up to get the correct thread tension. The feed rod probably also helps. Unfortunately when in use one is so concentrating on the thread going on the rod that you don’t look to see if this rod is bending to also provide tension on the thread, I suspect it is.
 

badcaster

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Finally back with an update, appreciate its been a while but the blanks have now had 7 or 8 coats of Danish oil, lost count to be honest but looking lovely. I'm sure there's plenty of discussion previously on finishes, but the number of coats will hopefully build up some moisture resistance. Oil fishes aren't the best, this link gives some info..
https://thefinishingstore.com/blogs/news/oil-finishes-and-moisture-resistance

You'll see from the pics that I've put together a basic wrapping thread feed, mods needed and having tried it without the tensioner I can see it will help for when pressure is eased during wrapping and the thread goes slack so I'll look at that.

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Found the rests are much too high. I'll drop them at least half height or even less. Also plan to put slots in the bases for the rests so it can pack away, will post pics when it's done.
 

splinters

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Don't agonise about water resistance, nothing will prevent moisture re entering the cane and reaching equilibrium. It's what that figure is that matters and heat treating has already done the work for you. An untreated culm of Tonkin contains moisture in absorbed form of 12 to 15%. This is what lubricates movement in the living plant. Heat treatment reduces this to almost nothing. Over the next 24 to 72 hours the moisture will climb back up, but only to 5%. Two things are happening here. First, the water is partially replaced by the movement of melted lignin into the space the water exited and second some limited damage is caused to the cellular structure of the bamboo preventing returning water molecules from re-attaching themselves to it. This reduction in water content is what gives the rod it's spring and set resistance as the bamboo's ability to move is restricted. (Source, Milward, Schott et al)
Soaking unfinished bamboo in water will wet the cells but will not re-bond permanently. Simple drying will take it back down to 5% again. For our purposes there is no such thing as a truly waterproof finish and varnish, oil etc. simply prevent waterlogging.
Thrilling factoid for you......... The Canadian Forestry Commision carried out experiments when testing bamboo as an alternative to timber. They found that no varnishes prevented osmosis permanently, the only 100% waterproof 'finish' was an inch thick coating of vaseline type parafin paste. Not very practical for us.
A wipe down with a cloth at the end of a days fishing and storing the rod in a dry place will protect the bamboo perfectly well. My grandad's old AYA No.1 had an oiled stock. It went through rather more wet weather abuse than your rod is likely to take and survived just fine. I have often fished experiments all season with no finish other than sealed wraps. No drama ensued.
Your danish oil looks well and will do the job just fine.

Simon.
 

badcaster

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Thanks Simon, interesting notes there, really puts the finish in perspective. I was thinking that previous posts referring to yacht varnish was about waterproofing the bamboo, clearly not the case. I was also thinking about the glue failing due to moisture ingress, so its useful to hear about fishing with no finish at all!

As a first timer dealing with bamboo the comments are really appreciated and very useful. Also reassuring comments about the oil I've used and the rod will likely not see a great deal of use, so I'm sure it will be fine. I find smartphone pics really can't do justice for wood finishes though, or maybe it's just my poor attempts!

When it's all finished I'll store it in the wooden tube which I've nearly finished, pics of that will follow too, no doubt the moisture balance will be achieved between the two.
 

badcaster

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Modified the thread feed table earlier with slots for the rests and added a spring tensioner. This really helps and I can let go of the rod and the thread doesn't move or go slack.

I've noticed that feeding with spools in front seems much easier as the rod seems to spin the correct way, maybe that's just me but it seems better.

Whole thing gets flat packed for storage til next time.

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liphook

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An AYA no1 is a very fine gun indeed Simon! Certainly up there with the London gun houses. Do you still have it and use it by any chance?
Apologies for wandering off topic!
 

splinters

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Looking good BC. Glue failures from damp aren't common and delaminations are an easy fix anyway. What can happen although it's rare, is that bamboo can swell if really soaked and loosen the ferrules by expanding them. Then as the bamboo dries it shrinks again leaving a joint ready to fail. Cheaper ferrules will occasionally fail like this. But we are really at the extreme end of the scale when that happens. We're talking about lost in the river for days type scenarios here, not a days fishing in the rain. Reading my post again it looks a bit like I think varnishing is a waste of time. That's not what I meant, It still protects the bamboo. I'm going to stop rambling now before I confuse myself but what I'm really saying is don't stress about it, all the accepted methods work just fine.
S.

An AYA no1 is a very fine gun indeed Simon! Certainly up there with the London gun houses. Do you still have it and use it by any chance?
Apologies for wandering off topic!
Sadly it went to my uncle, a keen golfer. Rather than put it on a FAC as per NI legislation he handed it in to the RUC for shredding. My language at the time was ungentlemanly. Forgive them father, they know not what they do.
S.
 

liphook

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That has nearly brought me to tears Simon! Heaven knows how it made and perhaps still makes you feel o_O
 

badcaster

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Well it's been a while I know but fishing has taken priority I'm happy to say, but back round to the rod build finally, fitted the handle this evening.
It was a bit of a bodge, the previous wooden handle core was not suitable so I chose to use a carbon section from a cheap whip from a pound shop, filled with resin and a dowel. Had to ream the handle cork carefully as the guides n blanks cork only came during lockdown with a straight 6mm bore, and I needed 13mm! Anyway after the glue up shocked that the glue seeped out of the female receiver part of the reel seat, a quick recovery was needed and I'm hoping it will be clear by tomorrow when it's set.
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badcaster

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The bamboo rod has been gathering dust over winter but hoping to get it out in the spring so started the guide wrapping at last! The jig works well and the slots are really handy for swapping the rests about to avoid the guides clashing as the blank is rotated.
 

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badcaster

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Well finally finished the little job over the weekend, epoxy applied and rod now ready to cast.
Tube shown as well is quarter sawn plane (lacewood) with elm and maple end caps.
I added oversized ferrules as shoulders to provide support to the turned blank - whether these stand up to casting will be evident fairly quickly!!
I've added a quick pic of the original rod at the start also to see where it came from.
Thoroughly enjoyed the process I must say and thanks to all on here for the help and guidance provided.
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Rhithrogena

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Great thread. This takes me back to the time I restored on of these multi section rods in the 80's. I got it in a Barnstaple junk-shop for £1.
I rewhipped it in claret, with the original rings, put a new handle and reel seat on it and finished it with a couple of coats of yacht varnish. We were building rods and tying flies as winter jobs at the fly-fishing school where I worked and I used parts available to me. There can't be many cane rods with a Fuji FPS seat!!
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I remember being amazed at the rods performance. I can still cast the whole of a 444 DT5 with it. It has a much tippier action than typical UK rods of it's era, obviously targetting the US market, and it has landed some good fish. I remember a really good grown-on rainbow at Upper Tamar lakes giving it a good test, which it passed with flying colours.
I hope your rods work as well as mine still does. One of the tips is a bit short after a car door incident but the other is still fine.
Thanks for a good read,
Rich
 

badcaster

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Thanks Rich, I hope mine lasts as long as yours has but the school boy error on turning down the section for the ferrules is a time bomb for me, I'm really looking forward to using it but wary as well. At least if it does snap I've the experience now to step up and take on a full rebuild from a fresh blank.
It was the action of this rod that caught my eye as well, I'd never even considered using a split cane rod but picked this up at our guild branch AGM sale last year for £15, it's also got a nice responsive tippy action that I'm looking forward to trying out, fingers crossed we'll be on the water soon.👍
 

Rhithrogena

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At least if it does snap I've the experience now to step up and take on a full rebuild from a fresh blank.
These still turn up on Ebay regularly. You could do worse than get another.....
Mine is due some tlc - hope to get a seatrout on it this year.....
 

badcaster

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Finally got round to giving the rod a try. After fishing for a few hours with my carbon rod I swapped over to the bamboo, noticeably heavy but cast really well. Used a #5 DT line for about an hour or more, landed some nice fish and no problem whatsoever thus far, so I'm a happy chappy.

Thanks again to all who helped guide me through the process.
 

Rhithrogena

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Finally got round to giving the rod a try. After fishing for a few hours with my carbon rod I swapped over to the bamboo, noticeably heavy but cast really well. Used a #5 DT line for about an hour or more, landed some nice fish and no problem whatsoever thus far, so I'm a happy chappy.

Thanks again to all who helped guide me through the process.
Brilliant outcome. Well done 👍
 

easker1

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we used to buy the Japanese rod kits when I was in the MN, it was my first real fly rod,the flies and the reel were real rubbish, but I still have sections of the original cane , easker1
 
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