Car Hire Iceland

mackiia1

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Waterford - Ireland
The key pieces of gear for a fishing trip in Iceland are your waterproofs! You need a wader (and a back up one - there is no nasty vegetation but lava rocks can be very sharp!) and a top quality shell jacket, be it a fishing one or a top quality mountaineering/trekking (gore tex Pro) one!
Good tip re second pair of waders.
I was on the Blackwater yesterday and discovered my waders had a little tear in the crotch- got a good soaking.
I've just bought a new Geoff Anderson jacket so hopefully that will be as good as promised.
 

docsalmo

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Oct 27, 2011
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Belgium
I have been in Iceland several times between 2009 and 2016. Always had great fishing. Always in July.

Salmon fishing can be (very) expensive. We have always done a couple of days on the char beats of Midfjardara. A lot of sea-run arctic chars, always a couple of salmon (17 salmon on 2 days for 5 fishermen) and sometimes a seatrout. Since it is the charbeat, the prices are reasonable. A few hundred meters higher up is where the salmon beats start. If you want to fish here, you pay more than 1000 GBP per day.

Besides that we also fish on the lakes in the Highlands for trout and landlocked arctic char. Places like Arnarvatnsheidi, Grimstunguheidi, Skagaheidi, etc. Prices are very moderate and there is plenty of fish.

General rule for me is to stay away from the fishing waters that are close to Keflavik and Reykjavik, because this is where the Icelanders fish in the weekends. It's better to drive 5-7 hours to remote areas.

I have never fished Thingvallavatn, but one of my closest friends has done it 3 years in a row. Always in April when the big browns come close to the shores. Just keep in mind that it is really very cold then. Not for me, I guess...

And yes you will need a heavy 4x4 because sometimes you need to cross rivers or drive on VERY BUMPY roads! Always make sure that you have the right insurance(s). And don't go offroad because that is illegal and they don't joke about that especially when tourists do it. In the past, we have rented with https://www.icerental4x4.is/en/vehicles/.

If you go it is best that you disinfect all your gear (rods, reels, nets, waders, flies...) before you go. Ask your local veterinarian if he can help, put everything on paper and ask him to put a stamp. You can also do it at the airport when you arrive, but it costs more and takes time. And of course you wanna go fishing.

Some good flies for sea-run arctic char: look for anything with pink in it. Bleik og Blá (pink & blue) is a good pattern. Heimasætan, Flæðarmús, Dýrbítur and so on. Fish as dropper fly.

Good streamers for brown trout are everything that looks like a stickleback, because that is a favorite prey of the trout in the lakes. Flæðarmús, Rektor and the "horny stickleback". (https://finestflyfishing.blog/2012/02/10/fliegenbinden-horny-stickleback/). Fish as dropper fly.

Traditional wet flies with gold pheasant tail are good for brown trout and chars in the highland lakes. Fish on the point.

For salmon it depends. Ask the guide or outfitter for information about what works best in that river on that time. Midfjardara was best with small salmon flies.
 

docsalmo

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Oct 27, 2011
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81
Location
Belgium
I have only 2 recommendations for dry flies. Most of the times you will fish streamers, wet flies, salmon flies...

(1) "Hitch" a tube fly. Let it skate on the water and make a V. Lift your rod for this. This sometimes work on salmon rivers and it can be considered as dry fly fishing because you see the salmon rising and taking your fly. I have tried bombers, but had no success.

(2) Sometimes you see large black hawthorns with orange legs. And the fish (in our case it was sea-run arctic chars) take them when the wind blows them into the water. We used large black klinkhammers with extra orange rubber legs to imitate this. And it worked.
 

squimp

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May 18, 2008
Messages
1,092
When I fished the Laxa, big klinks and foam beetles were the usual dry patterns.

I taught myself how to tie klinkhammers before I went and then caught a pb fish on one, which was fantastic.

Use proper hooks - some of the fish are really large and ordinary dry fly hooks are too fine in the wire. I tied some flies on coarse fishing hooks that were both small and very strong.

The bad news was that the weather was pretty dull and cool whilst I was there -so much of the time a nymph based approach was the way to go.

I second the advice about sun rays etc. On another trip I had good fish every evening at last light by stripping a surface fly across the biggest pools. The takes were spectacular.

I also caught a lot of char in one lake on smaller dries - mostly black ones. The fish were 3 - 5 lb.
 

docsalmo

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Oct 27, 2011
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Belgium
Once you are in Iceland, you will notice that it is really an amazing country. So why not take 1 or 2 days for sightseeing. Visit the geysers and Gulfoss waterfall. Or the famous Blue Lagoon. Just to name a few.
 

mackiia1

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Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
3,009
Location
Waterford - Ireland
When I fished the Laxa, big klinks and foam beetles were the usual dry patterns.

I taught myself how to tie klinkhammers before I went and then caught a pb fish on one, which was fantastic.

Use proper hooks - some of the fish are really large and ordinary dry fly hooks are too fine in the wire. I tied some flies on coarse fishing hooks that were both small and very strong.

The bad news was that the weather was pretty dull and cool whilst I was there -so much of the time a nymph based approach was the way to go.

I second the advice about sun rays etc. On another trip I had good fish every evening at last light by stripping a surface fly across the biggest pools. The takes were spectacular.

I also caught a lot of char in one lake on smaller dries - mostly black ones. The fish were 3 - 5 lb.
What way did you fish the Nymphs on the Laxa and which nymph patterns/size would you recommend .
Thanks
 

squimp

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Joined
May 18, 2008
Messages
1,092
What way did you fish the Nymphs on the Laxa and which nymph patterns/size would you recommend .
Thanks
Nothing clever— variants on p tails, hare’s ear, black buzzers, Prince etc etc. Weighted and unweighted. Tie them on decent hooks (again!).

Basic search techniques - either a single nymph or ‘klink and dink‘ style.
 

mackiia1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
3,009
Location
Waterford - Ireland
Nothing clever— variants on p tails, hare’s ear, black buzzers, Prince etc etc. Weighted and unweighted. Tie them on decent hooks (again!).

Basic search techniques - either a single nymph or ‘klink and dink‘ style.
Thanks Squimp - good to know nothing fancy needed.
 

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