Chalkstream: Fishing the Perfect River

thetrouttickler

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Last photo, it is the river Wye in Wycombe, not the river Wick.
It looks like Wick or Wycombe is the historical name for the river - many sources from the 19th century in the book and also in online archive records. He doesn't mention the name Wye in the book. Any idea when and why the name appears to have changed?
 
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Looks as though the original one is a bit pricey!4F38A012-FC9E-4ADB-8875-572814452602.png
 

Jeltz

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It looks like Wick or Wycombe is the historical name for the river - many sources from the 19th century in the book and also in online archive records. He doesn't mention the name Wye in the book. Any idea when and why the name appears to have changed?
No idea when the name was changed or if it was changed, the river runs through the Wye valley, I can't see why it would be called the river Wick on that basis, there is nothing with the name Wick in the area apart from Wickes DIY store and that is fairly new.
 

thetrouttickler

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No idea when the name was changed or if it was changed, the river runs through the Wye valley, I can't see why it would be called the river Wick on that basis, there is nothing with the name Wick in the area apart from Wickes DIY store and that is fairly new.
Because Wycombe is, I understand, a shortening of Wye-combe?
 

Jeltz

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Because Wycombe is, I understand, a shortening of Wye-combe?
That makes sense, Wy-combe, and probably the reason it was named the river Wye. I still think he has made an error with the name Wick. If it was named after the way Wycombe is pronounced, that would make some sense, but I can't find any record of it on google or wiki.
 

BobP

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Two River Duns missing - one that flows through Hungerford before joining the Kennet and one that joins the Test near Mottisfont. Then there's the Hiz and the Ver in Hertfordshire. The we have the Aldbourne which is a winterbourne for most of its length but there is permanent flow before joining the Kennet upstream of Littlecote, and if we really want to push our luck there is the Ogbourne that joins the Kennet downstream of Marlborough and the Misbourne in Bucks. What, too, of the Gade in Herts - goes through Hemel Hempstead.
 

thetrouttickler

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That makes sense, Wy-combe, and probably the reason it was named the river Wye. I still think he has made an error with the name Wick. If it was named after the way Wycombe is pronounced, that would make some sense, but I can't find any record of it on google or wiki.
In the map section it is described as "The River Wick (or Wye or Wycombe Stream)."

He quotes verbatim from two reports:

(i) Mid Thames River Report in the Fishing Gazette dated 25 September 1890, refers to it interchangeably as the River Wick or Wycombe Stream.

(ii) A report in the Fishing Gazette dated 22 December 1894 refers to it as the Wycombe Stream.

Interestingly, it says trout eggs were taken from the Wycombe Stream to Tasmania in 1864 by James Youl. I have been to the actual hatchery in Tasmania, on the Plenty River, where there is a museum.

You are right though, in that there isn't a lot of mention of either name online. There are a few, mostly historic, such as this one in the national archive from 1863.


And this one, calling it the River Wick, from a book published in 1813 (it also calls it the river "Wyke" which is probably the origin of "Wye"?).

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=0_zmAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA480&lpg=PA480&dq=river+wick+wycombe&source=bl&ots=Hevv8Uex54&sig=ACfU3U2nmsft-Y_jIUmwfdPbZWYXefLPPw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwih9qavkoTqAhURUBUIHUy-D-8Q6AEwDHoECA0QAQ#v=onepage&q=river wick wycombe&f=false

I think it's kinda cool to re-awaken old history and revert to historical names where possible.
 
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thetrouttickler

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Two River Duns missing - one that flows through Hungerford before joining the Kennet and one that joins the Test near Mottisfont. Then there's the Hiz and the Ver in Hertfordshire. The we have the Aldbourne which is a winterbourne for most of its length but there is permanent flow before joining the Kennet upstream of Littlecote, and if we really want to push our luck there is the Ogbourne that joins the Kennet downstream of Marlborough and the Misbourne in Bucks. What, too, of the Gade in Herts - goes through Hemel Hempstead.
Several of those rivers are mentioned in the book proper, and all of them appear in the maps, although it's called the "Og" downstream of Marlborough, not "Ogbourne" :)
 

BobP

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Several of those rivers are mentioned in the book proper, and all of them appear in the maps, although it's called the "Og" downstream of Marlborough, not "Ogbourne" :)
That's because it doesn't dry up there. The last couple of hundred metres have permanent flow before it joins the Kennet near the Sewage works.
 

lillywhite

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That makes sense, Wy-combe, and probably the reason it was named the river Wye. I still think he has made an error with the name Wick. If it was named after the way Wycombe is pronounced, that would make some sense, but I can't find any record of it on google or wiki.
Jeltz, have a look at 'Silt Road-The Story of a Lost River' by the same author. An interesting read, particularly for anyone living in Wycombe/Wye Valley area.
 
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