Confused strike indicator

kimjb

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May 6, 2021
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West Yorkshire
Hi, I am in need of some advice.
I was fishing a still water on Tuesday - cold, wet and very windy.
I was using a NewZealand strike indicator with a buzzer or haresear.
IN the wind the strike indicator (white wool) was blown around and left a trail of wool.
A few brown trout seemed to like it, and would rise to push it along.

When I pulled it fast though the water one brown trout was very excited and chased it for a while. (I tried a white zonker after that, to no avail).

As it was quite large I would be interested to know what they thought it was and were doing.
I shifted to small dries, but had no interest. Would a large white dry have worked - depending on what they thought the wool was?

I did not have any large dries with me.

Any help much appreciateed.
 

BobP

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Oct 28, 2007
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If you were leaving a trail of wool then it wasn't seated firmly enough into the tubing. Next, under those conditions you need to do three things. 1) Use a weighted buzzer to help it sink; 2) Mend the line to slow the drift. Buzzers don't career through the water; 3) If mending is not enough then walk it downwind. Cast and then edge downwind with it. That will give you a nice slow drift.
 

Wee Jimmy

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Fife
As it was quite large I would be interested to know what they thought it was and were doing.
I shifted to small dries, but had no interest. Would a large white dry have worked - depending on what they thought the wool was?



Any help much appreciateed.

Probably inexperienced or recently stocked fish ,they dont think it might be anything in particular. In fact, fish do not have the brain capacity to "think". They were merely reacting to an unfamiliar object in their element and perhaps checking out if it may be something edible.
 

running bear

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North County Dublin
Wild river trout frequently nose dries, will what appears little intention of taking them. Ive seen it on large sedges in 12s and size 22s whisps of cdc, if it wasnt for the water clarity, eslecially with smaller flies, you could think it a strikable rise.

Pike do similar, ive observed many folloiwng below a lure or fly, giving it the odd nudge with a closed snout.

I think its inqusitive when they see something thats not quite right.
 

Vermontdrifter

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Who knows what goes through a fish’s brain as I’ve seen them rise to snow flakes and in clear waters bump a nymph repeatedly with their snout but not take it.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Embra
IN the wind the strike indicator (white wool) was blown around and left a trail of wool.
A few brown trout seemed to like it, and would rise to push it along.

As it was quite large I would be interested to know what they thought it was and were doing.
I shifted to small dries, but had no interest. Would a large white dry have worked - depending on what they thought the wool was?

I did not have any large dries with me.

We quite often see trout swirling at white feathers floating on the water - sometimes things 2 or 3 inches long. The wind catching them and spinning them is obviously triggering a response. However, their feeding drive is always modulated by their self-preservation drive - which is why they shy away from our flies so often.

We also regularly find small feathers in stomach contents. However, I think these are occasional and accidental swallowings - it looked like food, and it didn't trigger the self-preservation response, so they ate it. We find all sorts of flotsam and jetsam in fish, including cigarette butts, floating weed tips cut free by swans, petals and sepals and seeds and leaves... and the one below... a sheep's castration ring...



I've never been tempted to tie a huge dry fly with a single 2 inch feather. However, a lot of folk do fish with gross shuttlecocks and Grunters with about a dozen full-sized CDC plumes in them, and they catch plenty fish. Not sure they are necessarily picking out the most residential ones, mind you... :whistle:

When I pulled it fast though the water one brown trout was very excited and chased it for a while. (I tried a white zonker after that, to no avail).

One of the most successful lures of the past 30 years is the cat's whisker...

cats-whisker_5399.jpg


... pulled through the water. Probably more closely associated with stockie rainbows than with brown trout. Over the years I have caught far more browns on big black lures than on big white lures. Maybe a black zonker might have worked better for you? I find a black 'damsel' is a good lure for browns...

Black-Howwood_5163.jpg


But if you were to pull a white booby along the surface, you would be very close to what you were doing with your sight-indicator... and folk catch fish on boobies fished on floating lines...

Santas-beard-booby_5217.jpg


Col
 

Mr Notherone

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Jul 19, 2013
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Monmouthshire
We like to imagine that trout are wily creatures as catching one makes us think we have "outsmarted" it....There's not much evidence for their intellect though.

If trout only ate artificial flies they 'thought' resembled naturals, thousands of attractor patterns and lures that wouldn't look out of place on a xmas tree, wouldn't keep catching them. Their strong predatory instinct will see them snatch at lots of things. Trout are occupied with staying alive and eating...not much else.
 
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