Daddy longlegs ?!

JohnH

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So here we are at the end of what's been a pretty dismal springtime in Hampshire. Although on both stillwaters and rivers, the trout have been willing to play if you get down to them in the water column. But this evening there's been not one, but two, large daddy longlegs in my kitchen ! WTF ??
 
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tierradelfuego

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Sounds like an excuse to catch more fish, an early DDL hatch is great. Plenty of fish looking up this side of Hamphire/Berks border so maybe a slow start will be a blessing in disguise...
 

mackiia1

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Here in Ireland we have had it pretty dismal too John - weather is all over the place.
April was dry and bloody cold - May , generally, has been cool, wet and windy.
2 weeks ago I left Tuam in Mayo at 16.30 and it was sunny and 18 degrees - an hour down the motorway in Limerick it was cloudy and 10 degrees.
Forecast for tomorrow morning is wet with thunderstorms :confused:

I won't even try to explain your 2 Daddy Longlegs guests.:)
 

bignedkelly

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Hopefully this bodes well for a better year for the daddies, up here in Fife I hardly saw a single daddy on the water last year
 

boisker

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There‘s a few 100 species of Cranefly in the U.K, although associated with flights periods of mid-summer through autumn (with highest numbers late summer-autumn), they can emerge any month of the year, with some species regularly emerging in spring... even wet springs :)
 

BobP

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John,
Here's something for you to ponder. Yesterday I had a few hours on the Kennet. Got one of about 3lb on an Olive Klink & got comprehensively taken to the cleaners by another fish on the same fly. My excuse is that he had only about 10' to go for cover and he was faster out of the blocks than Usain Bolt.

After lunch I noticed that the swifts, martins and swallows hunting hard over the river and on my stroll upriver I caught a slight movement against the reeds on the far side of the river. I stopped to watch and saw a good sized brown rising very gently tight to the reeds. I had a DLL on the leader and rather than change I decided to chuck this at the fish. Quite a long cast and the fish was very tight to the reeds so not a lot of room for error. Third cast dropped dead right and the fish took immediately. The flies coming down the river were BWO's and yet this fish scoffed a DLL with no hesitation. He was as near 4lb as makes no odds.

The big question? Why did he do that?
 

JohnH

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The big question? Why did he do that?
Good question, Bob. Clearly not what is called a "selective trout"; I think Bob Wyatt is closer to the truth when he says what seems to us to be selective feeding is really a simple form of tunnel vision. So if the trout is feeding opportunistically, and there's early DDLs around in Wessex, and what looks like a big protein hit in the form of your fly appears in front of him... Bob hits the bullseye ?
 
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BobP

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The odd thing is that 50 metres further upstream there were about 7 or 8 trout feeding on BWO's and not one showed the slightest interest in the DLL. The #16 Olive Kling was likewise ignored but when I dug out a #16 Olive Comparadun I caught three more and rose another 4 or 5 - bad timing in the strong wind & rain.

Today at Dunbridge we had a good mayfly in the afternoon and also a good BWO hatch at the same time. I identified one trout feeding exclusively on the BWO's & ignoring the mayflies. I switched to a Comparadun for this fish & the client hooked it but subsequently lost it. Proved that it was BWO and not mays that he was after.
 

JohnH

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Mayfly has kicked off, then. That's good to hear, I was too early for it last week at Whitchurch. Did you see any of the excellent grayling that are in the Dun ?
 

BobP

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Mayfly has kicked off, then. That's good to hear, I was too early for it last week at Whitchurch. Did you see any of the excellent grayling that are in the Dun ?
The Dun was coloured yesterday when we arrived, though not badly enough to prevent fishing. However, two heavy showers brought the level up about 4" and coloured the river more though it didn't seem to bother either the fish or the flies. The final straw was at about 5.15 when an even heavier rain storm plus hail brought matters to an end. The river rapidly went chocolate and rose even further.

No grayling were seen or caught.
 

JohnH

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That's why it's called the River Dun, as in the pub name Dun (ie brown) Cow. It should clear within 24 hours after the rain stops.

Grayling and coloured water don't mix at all well, I have found. Whether it's summer and autumn fly fishing, or with bait through to late February.
 

JCP

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Dorset Wilts Borders & Baja
John,
Here's something for you to ponder. Yesterday I had a few hours on the Kennet. Got one of about 3lb on an Olive Klink & got comprehensively taken to the cleaners by another fish on the same fly. My excuse is that he had only about 10' to go for cover and he was faster out of the blocks than Usain Bolt.

After lunch I noticed that the swifts, martins and swallows hunting hard over the river and on my stroll upriver I caught a slight movement against the reeds on the far side of the river. I stopped to watch and saw a good sized brown rising very gently tight to the reeds. I had a DLL on the leader and rather than change I decided to chuck this at the fish. Quite a long cast and the fish was very tight to the reeds so not a lot of room for error. Third cast dropped dead right and the fish took immediately. The flies coming down the river were BWO's and yet this fish scoffed a DLL with no hesitation. He was as near 4lb as makes no odds.

The big question? Why did he do that?
Here comes protein.DDL's hard to resist for any fish looking up in that situation.As seasons come and go and fly life declines a more sunstantial offering seems to be preferred overall unless fish are really locked on to a hatch.Talking specifically Hants,Dorset,Wiltshire rivers.
 

BobP

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No shortage of fly life on that river JCP. There was a very heavy hatch of Blue Winged Olives all afternoon. That fish rose at least half a dozen times to BWO while I watched. I think it was a Crabtree moment. The fish was very close to the reeds and the DLL arrived on his nose just as if it had fallen off or blown off. Too good to miss.
 

Reg Wyatt

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No shortage of fly life on that river JCP. There was a very heavy hatch of Blue Winged Olives all afternoon. That fish rose at least half a dozen times to BWO while I watched. I think it was a Crabtree moment. The fish was very close to the reeds and the DLL arrived on his nose just as if it had fallen off or blown off. Too good to miss.
I'm still curious Bob. A heavy hatch of BWO'S, the fish was rising to them, and you had a daddy longlegs tied on?

Reg Wyatt
 
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